CA&ES Currents Newsletter  icon newspaper

April 14, 2000

Jun 05, 2014 admin


Campus Memorial Held for Five Boating Victims

A campus memorial was held Monday, April 10, 2000, for the victims of the March 27 boating accident in the Sea of Cortez. The ceremony was open to all family, friends, colleagues, students and members of the public who wished to remember the five who did not return from the research expedition in Mexico and to offer condolence to their families. The memorial service honored: Gary Polis, 53, professor and chair of the Department of Environmental Science and Policy; expedition organizer Michael D. Rose, 27, postgraduate researcher and technician for Professor Polis Masahiko Higashi, 45, professor, Kyoto University Takuya Abe, 55, professor, Kyoto University Shigeru Nakano, 37, Kyoto University Survivors of the accident are: Ralph Haygood, 35, graduate student Gary Huxel, 38, postgraduate researcher Becca Lewison, 28, graduate student Sarah Ratay, 20, undergraduate student The researchers were part of an expedition visiting the Sea of Cortez to study the ecology of spiders and scorpions that inhabit the area's islands.

Complete information about the accident is available at theUC Davis website


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Donald Munns Loses Battle with Cancer
Professor emeritus Donald Munns, Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, died March 16, 2000, near his home in St. Ives, New South Wales, a suburb of Sydney. He retired from UC Davis in 1991 after a 25-year career. Faculty, staff and students in the department remember him as an outstanding teacher and mentor for graduate students, as well as a careful, creative researcher. Munns earned his B.S. in agricultural chemistry from the University of Sydney in 1954 and his Ph.D. in soil science from UC Berkeley in 1961.


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Neal Van Alfen Testifies on Crop Terrorism Bill
Neal Van Alfen, dean of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, testified on April 12, 2000, in support of new legislation that would levy specific civil penalties for destruction of research crops. The hearing before the Assembly Committee on Agriculture was held at the State Capitol. The bill, AB 2510, Civil Penalties for Destruction of Research Crops, was introduced by Assemblywoman Helen Thomson in response to several incidents of research-crop destruction last fall at UC Davis and UC Berkeley. A group calling itself "Reclaim the Seeds" said that it had destroyed the crops in protest against genetic engineering. The new bill would provide for civil penalties of up to twice the monetary value of crops destroyed. Testifying with Van Alfen was graduate student Sharon Kessler who lost six months of her research efforts last year when a crop of non-genetically engineered corn was destroyed by activists.

Matthew G. Hargrove
Government and Community Relations
[email protected]
(530) 752-9796

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David Burger Wins Distinguished Service Award
Professor David Burger, chair of the Department of Environmental Horticulture, was among 12 individuals honored for contributions by the UC Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources. Burger received the 1999 Distinguished Service Award in the "Outstanding Faculty" category. The award recognizes Burger's leadership activities, including improving communication among CE advisors and developing the Ornamental Horticulture Research and Information Center (OHRIC). OHRIC will be a statewide Cooperative Extension resource providing outreach, news and information on the California horticulture industry.


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Linda Whent Recognized by FFA
Lecturer Linda Whent, Department of Agronomy and Range Science, was awarded the honorary state FFA degree by the State Executive Committee for the California Association of Future Farmers of America, the highest honor the association bestows. Whent received her Bachelor's Degree in animal science and Master's in education from UC Davis and her Ph.D. in Agricultural Education at Iowa State University. She recently served on the state committee to establish standards of quality and effectiveness for subject matter in agriculture education. Whent received the western regional Outstanding Young Member Award from the American Association of Agricultural Educators in 1997.


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Kenneth Tate Named Outstanding Young Range Professional
Cooperative Extension rangeland watershed specialist Kenneth Tate, Department of Agronomy and Range Science, received the Outstanding Young Range Professional Award from the Society of Range Management. The award is presented to a society member who demonstrates extraordinary potential and promise as a range management professional. It was presented during the organization's 53rd annual meeting in Boise, Idaho. In only five years, Tate rallied a team of researchers to focus on water quality in grazed watersheds. His research and education program extends to nearly every county in California. A society spokesperson commented that public and private range managers respect Tate for his application of science to the solution of applied problems and for his integrity. "His research and education programs on non-point source pollution have helped resolve conflict in highly visible watersheds, resulting in changes in practices on rangelands throughout California and in protecting the quality of drinking water for millions of people in the state's urban areas." Tate earned his B.S. and M.S. in agronomy and range science at Oklahoma State University, Stillwater; he received his Ph.D. in water resources.


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Mark Francis Receives ASLA Award
Professor Mark Francis, landscape architecture program, Department of Environmental Design, and landscape Extension specialist Andreas Reimann in the Department of Environmental Horticulture, recently won the 1999 Award of Honor for Communications from the American Society of Landscape Architects for their book, "The California Landscape Garden: Ecology, Culture and Design." The book, illustrated by Yan Nascimbene, introduces ecological ideas with landscape design principles in a non-technical manner.


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Scott Rozelle Wins World Bank Award
Associate professor Scott Rozelle, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, was presented an Excellence in Economic and Sector Work Award from The World Bank for exemplary leadership and personal contribution. Rozelle's work on the China Rural Development project was selected from among 100 projects completed during fiscal year 1998-99 and noted for outstanding quality. In a letter congratulating Rozelle, Sven Sandstrom, managing director of The World Bank stated: "While we recognize that any good Economic and Sector Work project is the result of teamwork, your personal contribution has been identified by your managers and colleagues as having had major impact. Your accomplishment sets an important example to your colleagues…and demonstrates that high-quality [projects] can make a major contribution to how we help our clients and stakeholders."



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Greg McPherson Honored
Project leader Greg McPherson of the Western Center for Urban Forest Research and Education, received the California ReLeaf Urban Forestry Achievement Award at the group's annual statewide meeting. The award recognizes McPherson's outstanding support of grassroots urban forestry efforts at the local, state and national levels through research and public outreach and for the spirit and enthusiasm he brings to the effort. California ReLeaf coordinates a network of 65 community-based tree planting and stewardship groups.



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Carl Winter Featured in Harper's? Believe it!
"This is definitely a different place to publish," explained food toxicologist Carl Winter recently when questioned about his lyrics appearing in the April 2000 issue of Harper's Magazine. Harper's published the lyrics of several of Winter's songs from his latest CD, 'Sanitized for Your Consumption: A Menu of Musical Morsels.' His songs were written to teach food safety. Winter is director of the FoodSafe Program, Department of Food Science & Technology.


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An Exhibition: The Shining Cloth
Through May 5, 2000 Design Gallery 145 Walker Hall An exhibition titled "Shining Cloth: Light-reflective Textiles and Dress" brings to the public many artifacts illustrated in the book recently released by Professor Victoria Rivers, Department of Environmental Design. Her book is titled "The Shining Cloth: Dress and Adornment that Glitter." The exhibition presents clothing, adornment and ceremonial textiles from diverse cultural and ethnic groups around the world. It highlights the arts, fashion, material culture, women's studies, anthropology and the natural sciences.

Rhonda R. O'Brien
Program Representative
Department of Environmental Design
[email protected]
(530) 752-6223

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LDA Lunchbag Lecture Series
The Landscape Architecture Program, Department of Environmental Design, presents its spring 2000 Lunchbag Lecture Series from 12 noon to 1 p.m. in 234 Wellman Hall. Lectures are free and open to the public. March 31, 2000
"The Garden in Film"
Heath Schenker, associate professor, Landscape Architecture Program April 7, 2000
"A Hmong Garden: Lessons in Building Community"
Sharyl McGrew, program coordinator, Kids in Gardens, Aquatic Outreach Institute April 14, 2000
"Not Just Food and Flowers: Urban Garden Programs in the United States, 1890s to the Present"
Laura Lawson, Ph.D. candidate, Department of Landscape Architecture & Environmental Planning, UC Berkeley April 21, 2000
"The Garden as Public Space"
Mark Francis, professor, Landscape Architecture Program, Department of Environmental Design April 28, 2000
"What Grows in Our Gardens: 20 Years of Ecological Agriculture at the Student Farm"
Mark Van Horn, associate director, Student Farm, UC Davis

Rhonda R. O'Brien
Program Representative
Department of Environmental Design
[email protected]
(530) 752-6223

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Juried Student Art Show
April 24 through May 19, 2000 Memorial Union Art Gallery Memorial Union, Second Floor The annual juried student art exhibition is open to the public from April 24 through May 19, 2000, at the Memorial Union Art Gallery. The competition includes painting, collage, ceramic sculpture, printmaking, drawing, sculpture, textiles, photography, furniture, crafts and VHS video. An opening reception will be held Monday, April 24, 2000, from 5:30 to 7:00 p.m.


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Food for Health: Functional Foods & Probiotics
The California Institute of Food & Agricultural Research (CIFAR) is holding a one-day conference focusing on food and food ingredients that provide health benefits through physiological effects beyond basic nutrition (termed functional foods) and probiotic foods that contain or encourage microorganisms that benefit the human digestive tract. CIFAR Conference XIII is titled "Food for Health: Functional Foods & Probiotics." It will be held May 22, 2000, at the California State Railroad Museum in Sacramento. Participants will interact with experts on research, development and commercialization of new functional foods and probiotics, as well as their sensory and clinical analyses. A poster session, food sampling, lunch and a review of health-related research programs at UC Davis are included in conference fees. The conference also lays a parallel track leading to UC Davis students interested in careers in these specialized disciplines. Conference participants are invited to browse the Railroad Museum and enjoy a wine reception and dinner in the museum's "roundhouse" following the conference.

More information is availableonline



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Multidiscipline Plant Diagnostic Workshop
The Multidiscipline Plant Diagnostic Workshop will be held April 25 and 26, 2000, in Robbins Hall. Participants will learn about the diagnostic characteristics of pathogens, nematodes, insects, nutrients and herbicides on annual or perennial plants. Information will be supplied to correctly diagnose plant symptoms, which could reduce herbicide use. The course is limited to UC personnel.


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Processing Tomato Conference
The fourth Worldwide Congress on the Processing Tomato will be held June 10-13, 2000, in Sacramento. The conference is hosted by the California Tomato Growers Association and the California League of Food Processors.


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Development Highlight: Viticulture and Enology
According to director of development Rick Swantz, the Department of Viticulture and Enology recently received a confidential gift of $150,000 in support of an existing endowment that provides research funding for viticulture. In addition, W. Andrew Beckstoffer contributed over $20,000 in stock to the department's Harry E. Jacob Research Facility near Oakville, California. This gift fulfills Mr. Beckstoffer's pledge of $50,000 to the Oakville campaign.

Rick A. Swantz
Director of Development
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
[email protected]
(530) 752-7961

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Air Shuttle Takes Off
Include the Air Shuttle Service in your research and outreach travel plans to the San Joaquin and Salinas Valleys in 2000. This season's Air Shuttle Service has begun and concludes October 29, 2000. The air shuttle departs from University Airport and serves the San Joaquin Valley throughout the season on Tuesday through Friday (except holidays). Service is expanded to the Salinas Valley on Tuesday and Wednesday. The service is available to all university employees or affiliated personnel on official university business. The fare for subsidized passengers (i.e., CA&ES, VetMed and DANR personnel) is $ .20/passenger road mile. The non-subsidized passenger rate is $ .65/passenger road mile. Payment is by recharge only. This season's service provider is Comstock Air Services.



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Lake Tahoe Clarity Update
In a cautiously optimistic outlook for the health of Lake Tahoe, the UC Davis Tahoe Research Group found slight improvement in the Sierra lake's clarity for a second straight year. The average transparency for 1999, as determined from the average of about 35 measurements taken during the best viewing conditions, was 69 feet, or 21.04 meters. This is the second year in a row that there has been an improvement in transparency. In 1998, average transparency was 66 feet. In 1997, lake transparency reached a record low of 64 feet. Limnologist Charles Goldman, director of the Tahoe Research Group and professor, Department of Environmental Science and Policy, believes it will take more than just two good years to conclude that we are winning the battle at Tahoe. "Unfortunately," he said, "since 1968, we have observed that although we may have improved transparency for as many as five years in a row, as we did following the 1983 El Nino, the trend of declining transparency in Lake Tahoe continues."

Charles R. Goldman
Professor
Tahoe Research Group
[email protected]
(530) 752-1557

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Call for Nominations: Donald M. Kerr Award
The Donald M. Kerr Award is presented annually by The High Desert Museum in recognition of exceptional community-based resource stewardship. The award recognizes the vital contributions in sustainable resource management made by lay people working primarily within their own communities through the High Desert region. Nominations will be accepted for individuals who live in or make their living within the High Desert and whose voluntary service has made a difference in the outcomes of local resource management decisions. The nominee's community service must be unpaid and have a positive impact on High Desert cultural or natural resources. Unpaid service excludes grants and awards received as part of voluntary efforts.


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RFP: Biotechnology Funding Opportunities
Calendar year 2000 biotechnology funding opportunities for UC researchers: BioSTAR matching grants Deadline: May 5, 2000 Interdisciplinary research and training grants Deadline: October 27, 2000 Economics, business, law and public education grants Deadline: October 27, 2000 Opportunity awards for conferences and workshops Proposals accepted year-round Opportunity awards for improving technology and industry relations Proposals accepted year-round

More information is availableonline


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RFP: Life Sciences Informatics Program
Life Sciences Informatics Program (LSI) is a life sciences informatics partnership involving the state, industry and the university - to drive the California economy. LSI supports innovative interdisciplinary research at the interface of the life sciences (from the molecular level to complex biological systems) and mathematics, statistics, computational sciences, information sciences and engineering. LSI will offer partnership forums throughout the state featuring UC research areas and targeting appropriate industry groups. Letter of intent deadline: May 8, 2000 Proposal deadline: May 22, 2000

More information is availableon the Web


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RFP: American Farm Bureau
The American Farm Bureau Foundation for Agriculture is accepting proposals for research projects in these areas:

  1. Advantages and disadvantages of the development of a voluntary market to trade carbon credits
  2. Impacts of agricultural mergers and acquisitions on agricultural production, marketing and transportation
  3. Feasibility and options for establishing markets for organic nutrients

 

 

 

 

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RFP: Agricultural Telecommunications Program

 

Cornell University and the American Distance Education Consortium (A*DEC) are soliciting proposals under the Agricultural Telecommunications Program. Program areas include - but are not limited to - agribusiness; agricultural biochemistry; agricultural communications and education; agricultural economics; agricultural engineering/bioresource engineering; agricultural profitability and sustainability; agronomy; animal science; applied statistics; biochemistry; biotechnology; dietetics nutrition; entomological science; environmental and natural resources; food science, technology and safety; genomics; human ecology; microbiology; plant pathology; plant science; rural sociology; and veterinary medicine.

 

Full information on this grant is availableon the Web

 

 

 

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Visit CA&ES Currents online at http://caes.ucdavis.edu/NewsEvents/News/Currents/default.aspx.

CA&ES Currents, the faculty/staff newsletter of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at UC Davis, is distributed every other Friday. News deadline is noon Monday preceding Friday publication. Send inquiries to Ann Filmer, [email protected].

Issue Editor:
Rhoda McKnight
(530) 752-9328
[email protected]

Contributors: Donna Gutierrez, Thomas Kaiser, Susan Kancir, Rhoda McKnight, Neal Van Alfen, John Weston.

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