CA&ES Currents Newsletter  icon newspaper

March 29, 2002

Jun 03, 2014 admin


A Message from Dean Van Alfen: Foods for Health

In past issues of CA&ES Currents, we introduced you to two of our academic priorities: 1) genomics and 2) water and watersheds. This time, we are introducing a third – “foods for health.” Few issues touch us all as food does. In our college, the concept of “foods for health” is the linkage of food production, food processing and nutritional studies in ways that never before were possible. Ours is an era where we can genetically alter the chemical content of foods for health benefits and to solve hunger issues. The Department of Food Science and Technology draws upon the fields of chemistry, biology, engineering and the behavioral sciences in its research. Faculty are studying how to boost our food supply, increase our knowledge of nutrition, preserve our agricultural systems, improve infant formula and increase the quality of cow’s milk, to mention just a few projects. We also have invested resources in hiring additional food science faculty. Beyond the laboratory one of the most exciting new projects is the Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science, thanks to Robert Mondavi’s $25 million gift. Groundbreaking is expected in 2004 on what will be the largest academic wine and food sciences facility in the world. Another bright spot is the USDA’s agreement to relocate its nutrition research facility, the Western Human Nutrition Research Center, to campus by 2004. During the winter, our college sponsored a popular “Foods for Health” seminar series. This was an opportunity for researchers and members of the public to discuss the links between foods and health issues, especially heart disease. In the final analysis, we believe our food-related research is an investment in the future of California and the world.

Neal K. Van Alfen
Dean
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
[email protected]

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Richard Sexton on Livestock Controversy
Professor Richard Sexton, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, commented in the Wall Street Journal on the rivalry between meatpackers and livestock producers. A Texas livestock study, Sexton noted, revealed that typically no more than two or three packers were available to bid on any given lot of cattle. Thus, producers sustained millions of dollars of losses as a result of bidding practices adopted by the packers.

For more information,click here


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Gyongy Laky’s Art Goes to Thailand
Professor Gyongy Laky, Department of Environmental Design, will have her design art shown in the U.S. Department of State's "Art in Embassies” program. Her work, "Apricot Vessel," will be part of a three-year exhibition in the Embassy residence in Bangkok, Thailand, during the tenure of Ambassador Darryl Johnson. Laky's piece, created in 1999, was first exhibited in Denmark and has appeared in several publications including the book, “The World of Interiors.” The work is composed of bent wood apricot prunings and constructed with a doweling technique using small, hand-painted, wooden pegs to pin the branch structure into a 2-foot high vessel shape.

Gyongy S. Laky
Professor
Department of Environmental Design
[email protected]
(530) 752-5480

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Philip Martin, Illegal Immigrants and Citizenship
Professor Philip Martin, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, discussed proposals to give U.S. citizenship to illegal immigrants who are farm workers. One suggestion would require workers to spend at least 90 days doing farm work to qualify for legal status. "Farm work is a job, it's not a career,” Martin told the Sacramento Bee. “People don't stay farm workers. Clearly, the number of days required will affect the number eligible” for legalization.

For more information,click here


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Susan Williams and Ed Grosholz on Invasive Seaweed
Susan Williams, a professor in the Department of Environmental Science and Policy and director of the Bodega Marine Lab, and Edwin Grosholz, a Cooperative Extension assistant specialist in the same department, were quoted in Science magazine on invasive seaweed in a San Diego lagoon. Williams suggests more studies of the effectiveness of eradication methods. Grosholz said tension between eradication and research is "a recurring theme in biological control."

For more information,click here


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Calvin Qualset Selected for CAST Award
Calvin Qualset, director of the Genetics Resources Conservation Program, is the 2002 recipient of the Council for Agricultural Science and Technology (CAST) Charles A. Black Award in recognition of his scientific contributions. CAST presented the award on March 14 during its annual board meeting in Arlington, Virginia. Qualset’s career has focused on how to conserve plants, animals and microbes and efforts to ensure they are publicly available to meet future food and industrial needs. Some of his most important contributions include the study of barley varieties in California that helped identify a plant gene located only in Ethiopia. He works on methods to assist farmers of all income levels in genetic resource conservation. In Mexico, Qualset helped develop a program to give poor farmers financial incentives to protect their historic crop varieties. CAST is an international consortium of 37 scientific and professional societies.

Visit CASTonline


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Jim Wolpert Discusses Vineyard Retirements
Professor Jim Wolpert, chair of the Department of Viticulture and Enology, referenced UC Davis Extension's online wine production courses in a Wall Street Journal article. He also noted how California's highly developed wine industry makes it difficult and expensive for small operators to compete. "Wine is made in almost every state, and it's a viable retirement job or a second line of income in many of them -- but not California," says Wolpert.

For more information,click here


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Christine Bruhn and Safe Meat and Poultry
Christine Bruhn, director of the Center for Consumer Research and consumer food marketing specialist in the food science and technology department, told the San Francisco Chronicle that reducing germs in meat and poultry is more complicated than it may appear. "The reality is, harmful bacteria are here, they are present in the world," Bruhn says. "You can't write a law against it unless you find a way for people to destroy it." Eventually, she believes, American consumers will favor irradiation to make food safer.

For more information,click here


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Academic Senate Office Move
Effective March 28, 2002, the Academic Senate Office, Academic Federation Office, the Emeriti Association Office and the UC Davis Staff Assembly Office will be located in 301 Voorhies Hall. This relocation will be for a period of one to three years. The Emeriti Center will continue to be located in Room 65 in Mrak Hall. Effective April 12, 2002, the Committee on Academic Personnel will also relocate to 301 Voorhies Hall.


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Picnic Day 2002
Saturday, April 20, is UC Davis' 89th Picnic Day Celebration. Students, parents, alumni and many other special guests will visit our campus to recognize our achievements and goals for the future. This year's theme is "Open Door, Open Mind." We invite everyone to stop by CA&ES’ yellow and white "college canopy" for a beverage and to say hello to Dean Neal Van Alfen. The canopy will be at the southwest corner of North and West Quad Streets, behind the parade reviewing stand bleachers near Wickson Hall. Come visit between 9 a.m. and noon.

Sharon E. Lynch
Assistant Director for Relations
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
[email protected]
(530) 752-1602

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Budget Information Available
The campus is communicating frequently about the budget reduction process.

For the latest news on the budget situation, faculty and staff can visithttp://www.news.ucdavis.edu/budget


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Voice Your Viewpoint – Op-eds
Faculty members often like to share their knowledge on a broad range of public issues in the form of opinion articles. Newspapers and magazines routinely seek short, well-argued, highly readable op-eds written by individuals with academic credentials. Now there's help from the Dean's Office in polishing and publishing those op-eds. Clifton Parker, Dean's Office senior writer, works with op-ed authors to sharpen arguments, edit to an appropriate length and identify possible publications. Contact Parker for editing assistance and a two-page tip sheet on writing op-eds.

Clifton Parker
Senior Writer
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
[email protected]
(530) 752-2120

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Hale and Hearty Beer
Beer may enjoy many of the nutritional qualities that make it an element of an overall healthy and balanced diet. Professor Charles Bamforth, Department of Food Science and Technology, published a review article on the nutritional qualities of beer in the January issue of Nutrition Research. Bamforth notes that beer contains antioxidants or chemicals frequently found in plant-based foods that appear to protect against heart disease and some forms of cancer. Beer also contains several B vitamins, notably folic acid; certain useful minerals; and fiber. He concludes that beer is at least as valuable as wine in its nutritional aspects.


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The Great Rice Flood
To reduce air pollution, the California state legislature mandated a phased reduction of rice straw burning in the Central Valley starting in 1991. Two years later, scientists began researching various alternative means of managing rice straw. These measures included burning, incorporation into the soil, rolling, and baling and removing the straw, all with and without winter flooding. Winter flooding was an important management practice to sustain yield. While weed pressure increased when straw was used, the authors found that fertilizer applications could be reduced, thereby lowering production costs and reducing the potential for water pollution. Winter flooding also provided significant benefits for waterfowl. Chris van Kessel, professor in the agronomy and range science department, William R. Horwath, associate professor in the land, air and water resources department, and Alison J. Eagle, staff research associate, contributed to the research.

For more information,click here

Chris van Kessel
Professor
Department of Agronomy and Range Science
[email protected]
(530) 752-4377

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Cavities in Carrots
In recent years, carrot growers have noticed that the fungicide that controls cavity spots on carrots is not as effective as it once was. Prior research has found that the Pythium fungus that causes cavity spot responds well to the fungicide mefenoxam. However, subsequent field studies revealed that repeated soil applications of mefenoxam actually increase the activity of microorganisms that weaken the fungicide. This makes the fungicide less effective in preventing the cavity spots. The researchers suggest that carrot growers practice longer crop rotations and limit the use of mefenoxam where possible.

For more information,click here

R. Michael Davis
Cooperative Extension Specialist
Department of Plant Pathology
[email protected]
(530) 752-0303

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Southeast Asian Fruit Trees
A conference on Southeast Asian fruit trees will be held April 23-25. Titled “Lychee and Longan Production and Marketing in California,” the conference includes a morning speakers’ program followed by afternoon field tours. The lychee and its relatives are some of the finest fruit from Southeast Asia. The Longan is Thailand's biggest fruit export. The conference will be held in its entirety in three separate California locations – Escondido on April 23, Ventura on April 24, and Goleta on April 25. Pre-register by April 15 for a $25 fee.



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Environmental Design Events
From April 9 to April 16, professor Dolph Gotelli's students will present an exhibition -- Inspiration, Interpretation, Installation -- in the Design Museum, 145 Walker Hall. The students' assignment will be to create an installation based on "things that inspire them." Hours will be noon to 5 p.m. weekdays. Gotelli is in the Department of Environmental Design. From April 16 to 26, the annual exhibition of design student work, selected by faculty, will be on display in Walker Hall foyer and hallways. On April 20, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., the public will be invited to vote for their favorite student project. On April 20, this year's Picnic Day fashion show, "Unhinged," will take place from 12:30 to 2 p.m. on the front lawn of Walker Hall. Contact Ken Kurahara for more information. On April 20, a solo student exhibition by design student Katherine Becvar -- Waterhouse Transfigured: Interpreting the Paintings of John William Waterhouse through History, Performance and Costume -- will be on display from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in 151 Walker Hall. Contact Becvar for more information. . On April 20, design alumni are invited to gather at the specially marked tent on the west side of Walker Hall front lawn between noon and 3 p.m. for cookies, lemonade and visits with design alumni.

Rhonda R. O'Brien
Program Representative
Department of Environmental Design
[email protected]
(530) 752-6223

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Arboretum Activities
On April 7, a tour of California trees will start at 2 p.m. at the Alumni and Visitor Center On April 9, a lecture, “Garden Design for the Central Valley,” begins at 7 p.m. at the Club Room, Veterans Memorial Center. On April 10, a “Walk with Warren” starts at noon at the gazebo. On April 14, a tour, “Creative Use of Containers Adds Punch to a Hot Valley Garden,” begins at 11 a.m. in the Arboretum Terrace. On April 14, the “Edible and Useful Plants for Your Garden” commences at 2 p.m. at the Arboretum Headquarters. From April 16 to June 4, arboretum writer-in-residence Maria Melendez will hold an environmental poetry workshop at the Arboretum Headquarters. The workshop runs from 7 to 9 p.m. every Tuesday.


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California Specialty Crop Grants
The California Department of Food and Agriculture welcomes grant applications from researchers on specialty crops. The department is establishing a new $7 million grant program to benefit producers of specialty crops in California. A specialty crop is any agricultural crop except wheat, feed grains, oilseeds, cotton, rice, peanuts and tobacco. Grants have a $300,000 limit per project. Deadline: 2 p.m., April 30 Send proposals to: Department of Food and Agriculture Contracts Office 1220 N Street, Room 100 Sacramento, CA 95814

Jeannette Barr
Contract Analyst
Department of Food and Agriculture
[email protected]
(916) 654-0808

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Humboldt Research Fellowships
The Humboldt Research Fellowship program invites applications from researchers in all disciplines interested in conducting research in Germany. The program is open to scholars up to 40 years of age. Fellowships are awarded exclusively on the basis of the candidate’s academic achievements. Applicants design their own programs and select their German hosts.

Visit HRF online



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Perennial Plant Grants
Grant funds for research are available from the Perennial Plant Association. Awards from $500 to $4,000 will be given to proposals on perennial plants, slow release fertilizers, height reduction by growth regulators, techniques to increase bud production, propagation techniques and invasive species. A written report of the research will be published in the journal Perennial Plants. Deadline: May 15

Steven Still
Executive Director
Perennial Plant Association
(614) 771-8431

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Graduate Fellowship Opportunities
The Center for Information Technology Research in the Interest of Society (CITRIS) is pleased to announce a fellowship competition to support graduate student research in the social sciences and related disciplines, including the agricultural and environmental sciences. CITRIS plans to award up to four dissertation fellowships (two year, $25,000/year) and four master's fellowships (one year, $15,000). Applicants must be enrolled in graduate programs in social science or related disciplines. Deadline: May 1 Send applications to: Donna Davies, Graduate Student Affairs Officer College of Engineering 1042 Engineering Unit II One Shields Avenue University of California Davis, CA 95626-5294 (530) 752-0592

CITRIS online

Donna Davies
Graduate Student Affairs Officer
College of Engineering
(530) 752-0592

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Visit CA&ES Currents online at http://caes.ucdavis.edu/NewsEvents/News/Currents/default.aspx

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CA&ES Currents, the faculty/staff newsletter of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at UC Davis, is distributed every other Friday. News deadline is noon Monday preceding Friday publication. Send inquiries to Ann Filmer, [email protected]

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Issue Editor:

 

Clifton Parker

(530) 752-6556

[email protected]

 

 

Contributors: Donna Gutierrez, Thomas Kaiser, Susan Kancir, Rhoda McKnight, Neal Van Alfen, John Weston.

 

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