CA&ES Currents Newsletter  icon newspaper

August 01, 2003

Jun 03, 2014 admin


MESSAGE FROM THE DEAN
A Message from Dean Neal Van Alfen: College Demographic Planning Committee

WHO
Richard Berteaux Wins Architecture Award
Peter Havel Receives Academic Federation Award
NIFS Farm Safety Award
Scott Rozelle Wins Quality of Research Discovery Award
Susan Williams Elected Fellow of the California Academy of Sciences

IN THE NEWS
The Raw and the Cooked
Eat your Broccoli
And your Grapes

WHAT
Call for Further Comment: Sustainable Agriculture Initiative
Miller Plant Science Award
Humboldt Post-Doc Research Fellowships

WHAT
Ag Health and Safety Conference, Sept 7 – 9
Soil Carbon Sequestration Workshop, Sept 22 – 23
Exotic Pests and Diseases Conference, Oct 8 – 9
Arboretum Events

A Message from Dean Neal Van Alfen: College Demographic Planning Committee
As you know, recent budget cuts as well as those of the past decade have dramatically slowed faculty recruitment at the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. This downward trend in resource allocation portends a continued low pace of recruitment for the indefinite future. As a result, the college now has a large number of outstanding faculty nearing retirement age and relatively few younger faculty in the pipeline. For example, we have one department where ten of twelve ladder faculty are at the Professor Step VI or above level; several other departments have no faculty whatsoever in assistant or associate professor positions. Situations such as these place our college at risk in terms of its future leadership role in research, education, external funding and other indicators of excellence. To fully and properly understand the long-term implications of this situation, I have charged the newly formed College Demographic Planning Committee with examining the demographic structure of the college’s faculty. My hope is that they can define the scope of risk in different fields and formulate recommendations for addressing the problem. In developing its diagnosis and recommendations, the committee will estimate both the number of expected retirements during the next decade and the evolving faculty age distribution that will result. Further, I have asked the committee to identify any gaps in the college’s desired demographic structure that are likely to severely threaten the college’s main teaching and research programs over the next decade. And finally, I have requested that they develop recommendations regarding the number, rank and timing of new hires that they believe would ensure maintenance of the college’s scientific preeminence, while mindful of other restrictions which the college and the campus are likely to face. I expect to receive the committee’s final diagnosis and recommendations sometime during the fall quarter and I will report their findings in this column. As always, we welcome your feedback. If you have questions or comments, please e-mail me.

Neal K. Van Alfen
Dean
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
[email protected]

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Richard Berteaux Wins Architecture Award
Richard Berteaux, associate professor in environmental design, received a 2003 California Council Society of American Registered Architects Honorable Mention for the design of Tan Orthodontics in Woodland. The annual awards honor California architects for "superior achievement and professional design excellence." Berteaux won in the rehabilitation/remodeling category.


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Peter Havel Receives Academic Federation Award
Among the three recipients of the 2003 Academic Federation awards for Excellence in Teaching was Peter Havel, research associate professor of nutrition. The award recognizes non-ladder-rank faculty members for their contributions to the research and educational missions of the University of California. Havel is internationally known for his research in understanding the metabolic and hormonal pathways involved in body-weight regulation and in the pathophysiology of obesity and diabetes.


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NIFS Farm Safety Award
The National Institute for Farm Safety recognized a team composed of Agricultural Ergonomics Research Center staff and their county-based collaborators with a National Farm Safety Research Award. The award, for contributions to prevent agricultural injury or illness, was made to three members of the Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering: James M. Meyers, agricultural and environmental health specialist; Professor John Miles, and research coordinator Diana Tejeda, as well as county advisors Ed Weber, Rhonda Smith, and Linda Garcia. The team was recognized for their article, “Priority Risk Factors for Back Injury in Agricultural Field Work,” published in the Journal of Agromedicine. The award noted that "This team of researchers at the University of California has been among the leaders of recent research on ergonomics in agriculture. Their work has been innovative and exclusively field-based, lending practical strength to their findings and recommendations.” The Journal of Agromedicine considered the paper important enough to dedicate an extensive editorial in the same issue to supporting its findings as pointing the way to improved understanding of and prevention of ergonomics injuries in agriculture.


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Scott Rozelle Wins Quality of Research Discovery Award
Scott Rozelle, professor of agricultural and resource economics, received the Quality of Research Discovery Award from the American Agricultural Economics Association. The award went to Rozelle and co-authors Hanan Jacoby and Guo Li for their paper, "Hazards of Expropriation: Tenure Insecurity and Investment in Rural China," published in the American Economic Review.


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Susan Williams Elected Fellow of the California Academy of Sciences
Susan Williams, professor in the Department of Environmental Science and Policy and director of the Bodega Bay Marine Laboratory, has been elected fellow of the California Academy of Sciences. The Academy is limited to having no more than 300 voting members. Election is for life.


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The Raw and the Cooked
A Sacramento Bee lifestyle article profiled the raw food movement, which claims that enzymes in uncooked fruits and vegetables confer fantastic health benefits. According to its practitioners, who consume no animal products, heating food to 118 degrees Fahrenheit destroys those enzymes. Barbara Schneeman, professor of nutrition and associate vice provost for university outreach, says that although the enzymes are inactivated by cooking, they are also inactivated by digestion. She also added that a raw-food diet might be low in some crucial nutrients. "It's basically a religion," said Louis Grivetti, professor of nutrition, who pointed out that man’s taming of fire some quarter of a million years ago led to cooking, which expanded the food supply, made many foods easier to digest, and killed microorganisms that could sicken people.

Read this rare story


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Eat your Broccoli
Carlos Quiros, professor in the Department of Vegetable Crops, was interviewed by the Pak(istan) Tribune regarding a new study that says broccoli can help prevent stomach cancer. He said the protective effect is not surprising because many of the compounds found in vegetables inhibit the growth of disease-causing bacteria and viruses. Quiros, who was not an author of the study, said he is researching the development of varieties of broccoli with higher levels of sulfarophane, the chemical responsible for the anti-cancer effects.

Eat your broccoli


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And your Grapes
A Sacramento Bee food section cover story on table grapes quoted Nick Dokoozlian, viticulture specialist at the Kearney Research and Extension Center, as saying the rising popularity of table grapes is due to scientific studies showing health benefits of wine grapes. "Many of the same antioxidants and polyphenolic compounds found in red wine also are in fresh grapes," he says. "As people become more aware of this, they will eat more grapes." Dokoozlian also talks about how researchers have bred larger and easier to grow grape varieties, all of which were developed using traditional plant breeding techniques.

Read it on the grapevine


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Call for Further Comment: Sustainable Agriculture Initiative
Last Friday, July 25, about 50 people attended a sustainable agriculture public town hall meeting hosted by the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Eric Bradford, professor emeritus in the Department of Animal Science who served as chair of the sustainable agriculture committee, reviewed the committee’s findings and recommendations. The floor was then opened for public comment. Neal Van Alfen, dean of the college, is requesting further comment on the initiative, especially from those who were unable to attend the meeting. When sending your comments to Neal Van Alfen, please indicate if you would like to be added to the college’s sustainable agriculture mailing list.

For background on the initiative, including the committee’s report, see theJuly 3 and July 18 issues of Currents.

Neal K. Van Alfen
Dean
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
[email protected]

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Miller Plant Science Award
Applications are now available for the Milton D. and Mary A. Miller Plant Science Award. Applicants should be UC Cooperative Extension employees or graduate or undergraduate students with an interest in Cooperative Extension careers. Deadline is September 1.

Details and application


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Humboldt Post-Doc Research Fellowships
The Alexander von Humboldt Foundation’s Research Fellowship Program supports scholars of all nationalities and disciplines so that they may carry out long-term research projects in Germany. Applications may be submitted for research stays of between six and 12 months, for a two-year fellowship, or for a summer research fellowship. Monthly stipends are included in the awards and special allowances are made for travel expenses, accompanying family members and German language instruction. The foundation awards up to 600 fellowships a year.

More information and application


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Ag Health and Safety Conference, Sept 7 – 9
The Western Center for Agricultural Health and Safety at UC Davis will sponsor a San Francisco conference for health care professionals, veterinarians, university researchers, agribusiness representatives, rural residents and government officials. The goal of the conference is to exchange information that will help reduce or eliminate chronic illnesses and injuries associated with agricultural work.

Details available here


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Soil Carbon Sequestration Workshop, Sept 22 – 23
The Kearney Foundation is sponsoring the Soil Carbon Sequestration Workshop: The Interface Between Science and Policy, September 22 – 23. This workshop, being held at UC Davis, will address scientific and policy considerations in developing strategies for carbon sequestration in California soils. Reports on developments in carbon sequestration in the U.S. and Europe will be presented. Participants will include regulators from California state agencies and UC and other researchers. Registration is free, but required in order to attend.

Information and registration


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Exotic Pests and Diseases Conference, Oct 8 – 9
The Exotic Pests and Diseases Research Program (EPDRP) has announced its second annual research workshop. This workshop provides an opportunity to hear invited presentations and review current research funded by EPDRP. The workshop is being held on October 8 – 9, at the UC Riverside Extension Center. Registration must be received by September 25, 2003.

Information, agenda and registration form


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Arboretum Events
Aug. 2, 7:00 p.m. Guided Tour: Enjoy your Mediterranean Garden in the Summer Heat Meet at the Arboretum Terrace Garden Aug. 9, 10:00 a.m. Guided Tour: Container Gardening in the Central Valley Meet at the Arboretum Terrace Garden Aug. 16, 10:00 a.m. Guided Tour: What's Blooming in the Summer Heat Meet at the Arboretum Terrace Garden

Arboretum calendar


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Visit CA&ES Currents online at http://caes.ucdavis.edu/NewsEvents/currents

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CA&ES Currents, the faculty/staff newsletter of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at UC Davis, is distributed every other Friday. News deadline is noon Monday preceding Friday publication. Send inquiries to Ann Filmer, [email protected]

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Issue Editor:

 

Bob Debarge

 

[email protected]

 

 

Contributors: Donna Gutierrez, Thomas Kaiser, Susan Kancir, Rhoda McKnight, Neal Van Alfen, John Weston.

 

Some Web links cited in this newsletter may be inaccessible to off-campus sites. If you want to view the full stories on the Web from off campus, you will need to provide a username and password the first time you try to view a story: username: clips password: newz

 

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The University of California does not discriminate in any of its policies, procedures or practices. The university is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer.


 

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