CA&ES Currents Newsletter  icon newspaper

December 08, 2003

Jun 03, 2014 admin


MESSAGE FROM THE DEAN
A Message from Dean Neal Van Alfen: Center for Metabolomics

WHO
Joseph Cech Wins USDA Teaching Award
Aquaculturists Honor Graham Gall

IN THE NEWS
Fox v. Eagle
Leave No Tree Behind
On the Prowl in Suburbia
Lost in the Translation

WHAT
RFP: Ogawa Tree Fruit and Nut Crop Research Grants
RFP: Viticulture and Enology Research Grants
Designs for Diversity in Higher Education

WHAT
Pest Science Conference, Dec. 18
ANR Listening Sessions, Jan 29 – Feb. 26
Arboretum Events

A Message from Dean Neal Van Alfen: Center for Metabolomics
Research indicates that it is increasingly likely that all humans do not respond identically to diet, but require different nutrients according to differences in their genetic make-up and metabolic needs. It is also clear that plants and animals differ in their metabolic profiles depending on their genetics and the conditions under which they grow. The emerging field of comprehensive metabolic analyses -- metabolomics -- promises to create important new tools for nutritionists, food technologists, plant scientists, animal scientists, medical researchers and others studying the many aspects of health related to diet and overall metabolism. UC Davis and the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences have often been in the forefront of new areas of scientific endeavor, and metabolomics is no exception. To promote the study of this emerging field, the college has established a Center for Metabolomics, the hub of which will be a shared instrument facility in Everson Hall, expected to be fully outfitted and operational by the end of March 2004. Bruce German, Department of Food Science and Technology, has agreed to serve as director of the Center for Metabolomics faculty advisory committee, which is comprised of a multi-school, multi-disciplinary team, including Lindsay Allen of the Department of Nutrition; Jason Eiserich of the Department of Nephrology; Bruce Hammock of the Department of Entomology; Dan Kleibenstein of the Department of Vegetable Crops; David Rocke of the Department of Applied Science; and Gary Smith of the Department of Food Science and Technology. The faculty advisory committee is charged with: (1) Overseeing the college’s metabolomics effort and providing advice on the general operation of the Everson Hall facility, including access to and fees associated with the use of equipment; (2) Providing oversight and assistance for development of proposals which will be submitted to agencies funding metabolomics research; and (3) Submitting a very brief annual report to my office on the center’s activities, including equipment utilization data, the status of research proposals facilitated by the center’s existence and a listing of research projects that have received assistance from the shared instrument facility. I’d like to thank the above faculty members who generously volunteered their time to ensure that the college’s Center for Metabolomics gets off to a positive and productive start. As always, I value your feedback. If you have questions or comments, please e-mail me.

Neal K. Van Alfen
Dean
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
[email protected]

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Joseph Cech Wins USDA Teaching Award
Joseph Cech, professor in the Department of Wildlife, Fish and Conservation Biology and director of the Center for Aquatic Biology and Aquaculture, was one of two Western Region USDA Food and Agriculture Sciences Excellence in Teaching Award recipients. Cech received the award at the annual meeting of the National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges held in New Orleans in November. The award recognizes and honors a select group of college and university teachers who have excelled at teaching, and it is designed to focus national attention on the important role of teaching in the continued growth and progress of our nation’s food and agricultural system. A plaque and $2,000 check accompany the award. Cech has taught courses at UC Davis on fish biology and physiology for close to three decades and is co-author of the world’s most extensively used ichthyology textbook. In 2001 he received the UC Davis Prize for Undergraduate Teaching and Scholarly Achievement.


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Aquaculturists Honor Graham Gall
At the 21st anniversary meeting of the International Association for Genetics in Aquaculture (IAGA) held in Chile in November, Graham A.E. Gall, professor emeritus in the Department of Animal Science, was recognized for his role as the organization’s founding father and one of its most active members. In 1985, while organizing an aquaculture symposium at UC Davis, Gall drafted a simple constitution for an organization with the sole purpose of ensuring the symposium would continue into the future. He dubbed the organization the “International Association for Genetics in Aquaculture.” Those in attendance (about 125) accepted the draft and IAGA was formed. Gall was subsequently elected secretary/treasurer, a position he held until 2000.


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Fox v. Eagle
Rosie Woodroffe, assistant professor in the Department of Wildlife, Fish and Conservation Biology, is co-author of a Science magazine article about the conflict between foxes and golden eagles on California’s Channel Islands. Golden eagles colonized the islands several decades ago, attracted by the plentiful feral pigs. As the eagle population grew and the pigs declined, the eagles turned to preying on foxes, which are “island tame” and make easy meals. Two of six fox subspecies are now extinct in the wild, and a third, endemic to Santa Cruz Island, dropped from approximately 1,500 to fewer than 100 in less than a decade. Restoring native vegetation and eliminating the feral pigs are measures that are being taken to deprive the eagles of a food source. Capturing and removing eagles to the mainland has helped slow the fox decline somewhat; but, the remaining eagles may be too difficult to catch, and shooting them may be the only way to save the foxes. In a Santa Barbara News-Press article for which she was the primary source, Woodroffe says, "Nobody wants to shoot the animals but it's a biological necessity."

Science magazine
Santa Barbara News-Press
Los Angeles Times


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Leave No Tree Behind
A Los Angeles Times story on the U.S. Forest Service’s study of the effects of increased grazing and logging in the Sierra Nevada’s 11 national forests quotes Jim Quinn, professor in the Department of Environmental Science and Policy, who was part of a team of scientists and academics who reviewed the study at the Forest Service’s request. Quinn said that scientists remain concerned that a number of species in the Sierra Nevada would "react badly" to the proposed increases. A similar story in the Sacramento Bee quoted Quinn extensively.

Los Angeles Times
Sacramento Bee


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On the Prowl in Suburbia
"Beast in the Garden," a new book on the rebounding of the U.S. mountain lion population and the animals’ increasing predation on humans, draws upon research by Lee Fitzhugh, professor in the Department of Wildlife, Fish and Conservation Biology. In the mid-1980s, he urged that hunting for mountain lions resume because of increasing threats to people -- a warning that was largely ignored by the government and other wildlife biologists. A long excerpt from the book run by the Los Angeles Times features an account of Fitzhugh’s efforts.

Beast in the Garden


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Lost in the Translation
A USA Today story about problems facing U.S. firms that move work overseas quoted Martin Kenney, Cooperative Extension Specialist in the Department of Human and Community Development, who says that companies that think moving operations to another country is going to be simple often get burned. Language barriers, cultural differences, import regulations and a lack of well-trained managers can make life abroad difficult -- but lower labor costs remain a major incentive.

USA Today


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RFP: Ogawa Tree Fruit and Nut Crop Research Grants
The College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences is pleased to announce that the Joseph M. Ogawa Research and Teaching Endowment Committee is accepting proposals from undergraduate and graduate students, and postdoctoral researchers for research projects addressing production problems of temperate zone tree fruit and nut crops.

In addition, proposals for educational programs (course development, extension activities and field short courses) benefiting UC students, the fields of plant pathology and pomology and the California fruit and nut industries are requested. Proposals may be submitted by students, staff or faculty.

Awards must be expended in support of undergraduates, graduate students, post graduate researchers and faculty/staff within the University of California system. Up to five $1,000 awards are available in 2004.

Include a letter of application, a research proposal (of less than 1,500 words) and a letter of support from a UC faculty member or department chair. Address questions and applications (via e-mail attachment) to Rick Swantz. Deadline: January 30, 2004.

Rick A. Swantz
Director of Development
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
[email protected]
(530) 752-7961

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RFP: Viticulture and Enology Research Grants
The California Competitive Grant Program for Research in Viticulture and Enology is requesting research proposals for 2004–2005. The University of California Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources, in consultation and cooperation with the American Vineyard Foundation, established the program in 1997 to address the needs of the California viticulture and enology industry. Deadline: January 30, 2004.

Full details, including application instructions and research priorities, click here.


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Designs for Diversity in Higher Education
The Institute for Women’s Leadership at Rutgers University has launched a research project to identify, examine and disseminate change strategies in institutions of higher learning that are working to enhance racial and gender equity. The institute is seeking proposals from full-time faculty members at colleges and universities who wish to serve as members of research teams pursuing coordinated activities to identify and describe ways in which faculty are creating change within their institutions. A letter of intent is due by December 19, 2003. Deadline for full proposals: January 23, 2004.

Institute for Women’s Leadership Web page
Full details of RFP, click here.


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Pest Science Conference, Dec. 18
The College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and its departments of entomology, plant pathology, nematology and vegetable crops are hosting a one-day pest science conference on Thursday, December 18, 2003, at UC Davis. The $50 registration fee includes handouts, lunch and live demonstrations.

Registration form

Janice Heine
Department of Entomology
[email protected]
(530) 752-492

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ANR Listening Sessions, Jan 29 – Feb. 26
The University of California’s Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources (ANR) is sponsoring a series of listening sessions to solicit stakeholders’ input on ANR, its programs and ways in which it can better address the needs of Californians. Sessions are set for the following dates and locations:

January 29 – San Luis Obispo
February 5 – Riverside
February 12 – Redding
February 19 – Parlier (Kearney Research and Extension Center)
February 26 – Davis

Full details are available here


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Arboretum Events
Dec. 10, 12:00 noon, Walk with Arboretum Superintendent Warren Roberts
Meet on the south steps of Mrak Hall

Dec. 13, 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m., Monthly Plant Sale
Arboretum Nursery at Orchard Park. Open to the public; 10 percent discount for members.

For more information
UC Davis Arboretum
(530) 752-4880
http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.htm


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Visit CA&ES Currents online at http://caes.ucdavis.edu/NewsEvents/currents.

CA&ES Currents, the faculty/staff newsletter of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at UC Davis, is distributed every other Friday. News deadline is noon Monday preceding Friday publication. Send inquiries to Ann Filmer, [email protected].

Issue Editor:
Bob Debarge

[email protected]

Contributors: Donna Gutierrez, Thomas Kaiser, Susan Kancir, Rhoda McKnight, Neal Van Alfen, John Weston.

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