CA&ES Currents Newsletter  icon newspaper

June 06, 2003

Jun 03, 2014 admin

MESSAGE FROM THE DEAN
A Message from Dean Neal Van Alfen: Agricultural Experiment Station Town Hall Meeting

WHO
Animal Science Corners Awards Market, Hogs Honors
Three Professors Share USDA Secretary’s Award
Barbara Shawcroft’s Denmark Installation

IN THE NEWS
World Ag Ministers Meeting Set for Sacramento
Tough Times Down on the Farm
Benjamin Orlove on World’s Oldest Art
Sprawl Not Greatest Threat to California Farms
Ladies and Gentlemen, Carl Winter has Left the Building

WHAT
Report: Animal Agriculture and Global Food Supply
RFP: 2003 Agricultural Telecommunications Program

WHAT
AES Town Meeting, June 9
College Commencement, June 14
47th Annual Weed Day, July 17
Arboretum Events

A Message from Dean Neal Van Alfen: Agricultural Experiment Station Town Hall Meeting
On Monday, June 9, we will hold the first Agricultural Experiment Station (AES) faculty town hall meeting, from 10 a.m. to 12 noon, in 3001 PES. I hope that this and future meetings will provide opportunities for discussion and exchange of information. Monday’s agenda will include discussions regarding: 1. Faculty evaluation of AES appointments, including a report from the Term Appointment Review Committee (TARC) regarding the 02-03 evaluation of AES fiscal-year term appointments. For background, see the January 31, 2003 issue of Currents. 2. AES mission statement and an overview of the Davis campus’ AES structure. 3. State of the AES budget and impacts of cuts. With the Legislature proposing $80 to $400 million in additional cuts to the UC system, nearly every university program is under a fiscal microscope right now and we are no exception. 4. Importance of and opportunities for expanding outreach. Strategically, we must bring greater attention to the positive, but often quiet, role of the Agricultural Experiment Station both within the college and university, and across the state. We must be accountable to our funding sources, our shareholders -- the public, the taxpayers who support our research and in whose interest our research is ultimately performed. I encourage all faculty with AES appointments to attend and participate. Only by working together can we get through these trying financial times and continue the experiment station’s vital research. As always, we welcome your feedback. If you have questions or comments, please e-mail me.

Neal K. Van Alfen
Dean
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
[email protected]

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Animal Science Corners Awards Market, Hogs Honors
As of late, the Department of Animal Science has acquired a near embarrassment of campus awards and honors. Professor and vice chair Chris Calvert was selected by the Academic Senate for its Distinguished Teaching Award, which will be formally presented at the June 10 Academic Senate meeting. Animal Science faculty have received the Academic Senate's Distinguished Teaching Award in five of the last six years. Professor Thomas Famula was named the 2003 College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences recipient of the first ASUCD Excellence in Education Awards. The newly established award, which is fully student-run, recognizes one outstanding faculty member for each undergraduate college. The field consisted of more than 250 nominees. And finally, graduate instructor Wendy Ward was selected for an Outstanding Graduate Teaching Award by the Academic Senate.

Read aboutTom Famula's award here


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Three Professors Share USDA Secretary’s Award
Congratulations to biological and agricultural engineering professors David Slaughter, Michael Delwiche and Paul Chen (emeritus). Their Multistate Research Project -- Technology and Principles for Assessing and Retaining Postharvest Quality of Fruits and Vegetables -- received the 2003 USDA Secretary's Honor Award in the category of "Promoting Health by Providing Access to Safe, Affordable, and Nutritious Food." According to a USDA spokesperson, the Secretary’s awards “are the most significant recognition the department can bestow to acknowledge outstanding contributions to agriculture.”


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Barbara Shawcroft’s Denmark Installation
Barbara Shawcroft, professor in the Department of Environmental Design, has completed a sculpture installation, “Spirit of Materials,” at the Silkeborg Art Museum in Jutland, Denmark, where she was invited to represent the U.S. in creating site-specific works. She was also interviewed by the Danish Broadcasting Corporation on the methodology of her structural process and particular use of materials. Exhibiting with Shawcroft are artists from Holland, Iceland and Finland.

See moreonline


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World Ag Ministers Meeting Set for Sacramento
A Sacramento Bee article provides an overview of the upcoming agricultural ministers conference in Sacramento. Mentioned in the article are Dan Sumner, a former USDA assistant secretary and now director of UC Davis’ Agricultural Issues Center, Judy Kjelstrom, associate director of the UC Davis Biotechnology Program and Martina McGloughlin, director of the UC Systemwide Biotechnology Program and adjunct professor in the Department of Plant Pathology. McGloughlin will also speak on the topic of biotechnology at a June 23 Sacramento public forum, “Agriculture, Hunger and Biotechnology,” sponsored by FoodFirst.

Sacramento Bee article
Agriculture, Hunger and Biotechnology forum


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Tough Times Down on the Farm
In an ABC News story about struggling American family farms, Steven Blank, a Cooperative Extension farm finance specialist in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, said, “The price you receive as a farmer for your commodity is determined by global supply and demand now, because it's possible to import commodities from any continent on the globe.”

Read moreonline


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Benjamin Orlove on World’s Oldest Art
Benjamin Orlove, a professor in the Department of Environmental Science and Policy, and editor of the journal Current Anthropology, told the National Post that a figurine found in Morocco is the oldest piece of art in the world and a key part of the answer to how art and symbolism evolved.

Get the whole storyon the Web


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Sprawl Not Greatest Threat to California Farms
The Los Angeles Times reported on California farms losing ground to expanding cities. Public policy expert Alvin Sokolow, a Cooperative Extension specialist in the Department of Human and Community Development, says lack of water, failure to remain competitive and profitable, and labor shortages threaten California agriculture more than the loss of farmland to sprawl.

More information


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Ladies and Gentlemen, Carl Winter has Left the Building
The Los Angeles Times’ Steve Harvey led off his May 29 column with news of a musically inclined food scientist’s parodies of pop hits. It seems that Carl Winter, director of the FoodSafe program and Extension food toxicologist in the Department of Food Science and Technology, regularly brings down the house with such ditties as “I Sprayed It on the Grapevine.” Later this month he will appear at the Special Librarians Association in Los Angeles.

LA Times column
Eat to the beat with Carl Winter!


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Report: Animal Agriculture and Global Food Supply
Department of Animal Science professor G. Eric Bradford served as chair of the research committee of the Council for Agricultural Science and Technology’s report, Animal Agriculture and Global Food Supply. One of the report’s most significant finding was that animals are more efficient at converting feedstuffs to high-quality food for humans than generally assumed. Part of this efficiency is because animals are able to convert human inedible products into human edible food. The information is being used by policy-makers who heretofore have heard only claims that animals are inefficient at resource utilization.

Purchase the reportonline


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RFP: 2003 Agricultural Telecommunications Program
The American Distance Education Consortium (ADEC) requests proposals for its 2003 Agricultural Telecommunications Program. Grants will encourage the development and use of an agricultural communications network to facilitate and strengthen agricultural extension, resident education and research, and domestic and international marketing of United States agricultural commodities and products. Deadline is July 15, 2003.

More information and guidelines


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AES Town Meeting, June 9
The College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences is holding an Agricultural Experiment Station (AES) faculty town hall meeting on Monday, June 9, 10 a.m. to 12 noon, in 3001 PES. Discussion will focus on the mission of the AES and how it relates to faculty appointments, the AES term appointment process and opportunities for AES outreach. A final agenda is being prepared and will be distributed prior to the meeting.

DeeDee M. Kitterman
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
[email protected]
(530) 752-9484

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College Commencement, June 14
Charles Soderquist of the Technology Development Center, a noted business leader and philanthropist, will speak at both the 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. commencement ceremonies of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences in Recreation Hall, June 14. Soderquist, who received his master's and doctoral degrees in agricultural chemistry from UC Davis, is a longtime friend of the campus. He has served as chair of UC Davis CONNECT, a program that assists entrepreneurs, and he has provided leadership to the alumni organization and fund-raising efforts.

Shirley Jordan
Commencement Coordinator
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
[email protected]
(530) 752-6972

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47th Annual Weed Day, July 17
Weed Day is an opportunity for pest control advisors, farm advisors, chemical company cooperators, college faculty and students, and regulatory officials to learn about current weed science research at UC Davis. A morning bus tour of field demonstrations and current research studies in terrestrial and aquatic weed control will be followed by indoor presentations in the afternoon. Lunch is included in the registration fee. Seven hours of PCA credit are pending.

More information and online registration


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Arboretum Events
June 7, 11:00 a.m. Tour: Container Gardening in the Central Valley Summer. Meet at the Terrace Garden. June 11, 12:00 noon. Tour: Walk with Arboretum Superintendent Warren Roberts. Meet on the south steps of Mrak Hall.

Arboretum calendar


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Visit CA&ES Currents online at http://caes.ucdavis.edu/NewsEvents/News/Currents/default.aspx

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CA&ES Currents, the faculty/staff newsletter of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at UC Davis, is distributed every other Friday. News deadline is noon Monday preceding Friday publication. Send inquiries to Ann Filmer, [email protected]

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Issue Editor:

 

Bob Debarge

 

[email protected]

 

 

Contributors: Donna Gutierrez, Thomas Kaiser, Susan Kancir, Rhoda McKnight, Neal Van Alfen, John Weston.

 

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