CA&ES Currents Newsletter  icon newspaper

October 24, 2003

Jun 03, 2014 admin


MESSAGE FROM THE DEAN
A Message from Dean Neal Van Alfen: Foods for Health Initiative

WHO
Carolyn Aldwin on Living Longer
David Campbell Wins Editors’ Prize
Dale Kester Awarded Highest Honor by Plant Propagators
Tony Kofranek: California Floriculture Hall of Famer

IN THE NEWS
Klamath Report Urges Changes
That’s Chinatown
Mercury Blues
Brightly Colored Fruit Important to Staying Healthy

WHAT
UC Discovery Grants, $60 Million Available Annually
RFP: 2004 IR-4 Biopesticide Research Program

WHAT
Workshop: Accessing, Sharing Genetic Resources, Oct 29 – 31
Arboretum Events

A Message from Dean Neal Van Alfen: Foods for Health Initiative
Earlier this month, a town hall meeting co-sponsored by the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, School of Medicine and Division of Biological Sciences explored faculty interest in the Foods for Health initiative. The meeting, held on a Saturday, was well attended and well received. In 1999, the Foods for Health Initiative was identified as one of the five components of the Academic Plan for the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Since then, interest in the initiative has grown both within and far beyond the college. Part of this interest is due to the cross-disciplinary nature of foods for health, not just among departments within the college -- such as food science and technology, nutrition, environmental toxicology and agricultural and resource economics -- but across several UC Davis schools and colleges. Along with our partners in medicine, veterinary medicine, and biological sciences, we hope that by developing a common initiative, UC Davis will be well positioned to be an international leader in this area of research, outreach and teaching. The development of research programs that ensure the delivery of new health-promoting foods that are safe and delicious and exploring diet as a means of preventing many increasingly common chronic conditions -- such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease -- are just a few of the areas of research that this initiative promises to encompass. At its heart, the mission of the Foods for Health initiative parallels the mission of the college itself, providing knowledge to the public and to food industry and health field professionals. The initiative can improve the health and quality of life of Californians, while, at the same time, reducing health-care costs and adding value to the state’s agricultural products. I encourage you to read the Foods for Health committee’s comprehensive report, which includes historical and scientific background information as well as proposed directions for the initiative’s future.
http://caes.ucdavis.edu/AcadProg/foods_for_health.htm

Also, if you need more information or want to become involved, I invite you to contact Tu Jarvis, divisional associate dean for human sciences at [email protected] or (530) 752-0110. As always, I value your feedback. If you have questions or comments, please e-mail me.

Neal K. Van Alfen
Dean
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
[email protected]

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Carolyn Aldwin on Living Longer
Carolyn Aldwin, professor of human and community development, is the co-author of a new book on clean living. The Daily Democrat interviewed her regarding the book and a UC Davis study suggesting that longer life can be attributed to better medicine and an emphasis on spirituality.

Daily Democrat interview


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David Campbell Wins Editors’ Prize
David Campbell, Cooperative Extension specialist with the Department of Human and Community Development and director of the California Communities Program, has received the annual Editors' Prize for the best scholarly paper in the journal Nonprofit Management and Leadership. Campbell's article, "Outcomes Assessment and the Paradox of Nonprofit Accountability," appeared in the spring 2002 edition of the journal and was based on research with nonprofit economic development organizations in California's North Coast region. The $2,000 prize accompanying the award will be presented to Campbell at the November 20–22, 2003, annual meeting of the Association for Research on Nonprofit Organizations and Voluntary Action (ARNOVA) in Denver.


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Dale Kester Awarded Highest Honor by Plant Propagators
Dale Kester, professor emeritus with the Department of Pomology, received the International Plant Propagators' Society International Award of Honor, which is the highest honor the society bestows on one of its members. Kester’s textbook, Plant Propagation: Principles and Practices, first published in 1959 and now in its seventh edition, is the standard text used in plant propagation classes around the world and has been translated into several languages, including Russian, Spanish and Italian.


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Tony Kofranek: California Floriculture Hall of Famer
Tony Kofranek, professor emeritus with the Department of Environmental Horticulture, has been inducted into the California Floriculture Hall of Fame. The award is given to those who have made outstanding contributions to the floriculture industry. Recipients’ names are engraved on permanent plaques located at the San Francisco, Los Angeles and San Diego floral markets. In the mid 1960s, Kofranek was part of the group of UCLA faculty that moved to the UC Davis campus to found what today is named the Department of Environmental Horticulture. His work with chrysanthemums, roses and azaleas -- as well as his research and extension activities in the area of postharvest physiology -- continue to have an enormous effect on the state’s floriculture industry.


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Klamath Report Urges Changes
A slew of newspaper stories appearing up and down the Pacific Coast reported on the recommendations of the National Research Council, which has been studying the Klamath Basin and the plight of its salmon for the past several years. The study suggests restoring wetlands and lakes and removing dams, and that taking water from farms would not help watershed restoration. Among 12 scientists who authored the study is Peter Moyle, professor in the Department of Wildlife, Fish and Conservation Biology, who says in a Eureka Times-Standard article, that some of the council’s recommendations can be implemented immediately. In a related story in the same paper, Moyle comments on the federal report on the 2002 fish kill.

Eureka Times-Standard
Los Angeles Times
Sacramento Bee
The Oregonian


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That’s Chinatown
Commenting on a “milestone” deal to sell water from Imperial Valley farms to Southern California cities, Richard Howitt, professor in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, notes that farmers use 80 percent of California's water supply but make up 7 percent of the economy. The agreement comes after seven years of negotiations among California, the federal government, Imperial Irrigation District, San Diego and other water districts.

San Jose Mercury News


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Mercury Blues
In the second part of a front-page series on mercury contamination in area rivers and wetlands, the Sacramento Bee quoted Darell Slotton, a mercury expert and researcher with the Department of Environmental Science and Policy. Slotton, who has spent over 15 years studying mercury at UC Davis, is among the scientists cautioning that restoring Bay-Delta wetlands could cause a more toxic form of the metal to be released into environment.

Sacramento Bee


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Brightly Colored Fruit Important to Staying Healthy
Liz Applegate, lecturer in the Department of Nutrition, gives advice in this nationally syndicated column on what to eat to stay healthy. Applegate is also the nutrition editor and a columnist for Runner’s World magazine and a nutrition consultant to the U.S. Olympic Team. Among her suggestions: “Try a new brightly colored fruit every week for optimal disease protection.” Editor’s note: California-grown fruit is the brightest in the world.

Scripps Howard News Service
Runner’s World (search Applegate)


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UC Discovery Grants, $60 Million Available Annually
The Industry-University Cooperative Research Program (IUCRP) awards hundreds of UC Discovery Grants each year in five fields of science and engineering, including biotechnology and information technology for life sciences. The grants form a three-way partnership among the University of California, industry sponsors and the State of California, and provide a streamlined path from lab bench to public benefit. Revolving fall, winter and spring application deadlines.

More information, including an onlineapplication


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RFP: 2004 IR-4 Biopesticide Research Program
The IR-4 Biopesticide Research Program requests grant proposals for funding of efficacy research, with a special interest in proposals containing biopesticides (rotated with conventional products) as resistance management tools. The amount of funding available for 2004 is $400,000. In 2003, the application success rate was about 44 percent. The application deadline is November 14. Electronic submissions are encouraged.

Full details, including an electronicapplication


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Workshop: Accessing, Sharing Genetic Resources, Oct 29 – 31
An international workshop, Accessing Genetic Resources and Sharing the Benefits, will be held at UC Davis, October 29 – 31. The workshop is sponsored by the UC Genetic Resources Conservation Program and the UC Pacific Rim Research Program, among others.

More information

Santiago Carrizosa
GRCP
[email protected]
(530) 754-8506

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Arboretum Events
Oct. 25, 11:00 a.m., Guided Tour: Birds on the UC Davis Campus
Meet at Arboretum Headquarters Oct. 26, 2:00 p.m., Guided Tour: The Year-Round Flower Garden
Meet at the Gazebo Nov. 1, 11:00 a.m., Guided Tour: Color in Your Fall and Winter Garden
Meet at the Arboretum Terrace Nov. 1, 9 a.m. – 12 noon, Workshop: Therapeutic Landscapes
Meet at Arboretum Headquarters, $35 /$25 members Nov. 2, 2:00 p.m., Guided Tour: History in the Arboretum
Meet at Buehler Alumni and Visitor Center Nov. 5, 11:00 a.m., Guided Tour: Landscape Gardening in the Valley Gazebo
, Bring your landscaping questions for our expert docent For More Information:
UC Davis Arboretum
(530) 752-4880

http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.htm


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CA&ES Currents, the faculty/staff newsletter of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at UC Davis, is distributed every other Friday. News deadline is noon Monday preceding Friday publication. Send inquiries to Ann Filmer, [email protected]

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Issue Editor:

 

Bob Debarge

 

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Contributors: Donna Gutierrez, Thomas Kaiser, Susan Kancir, Rhoda McKnight, Neal Van Alfen, John Weston.

 

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