CA&ES Currents Newsletter  icon newspaper

September 26, 2003

Jun 03, 2014 admin


MESSAGE FROM THE DEAN
A Message from Dean Neal Van Alfen: Plant Sciences Implementation Committee

WHO
Cort Anasasio Beats Summer Heat
Jim Millam’s Lab is for the Birds

IN THE NEWS
Eat Less at Mid-life, Live Longer
Slacker Bacteria Punished
A Chocolate a Day Keeps the Doctor Away
For Sale: Dolly’s Parent Company

WHAT
RFP: Agricultural Literacy and Issues Grants
RFP: 2004 IR-4 Biopesticide Research Program
Natural Reserve System Graduate Research Grants
RFP: Kearney Foundation of Soil Science

WHAT
Sustainable Agriculture Lecture Series Kick Off, Oct 3
Foods for Health Town Hall Meeting, Oct 4
Annual Plant Faire, Oct 4
Conservation Tillage Workshops, Oct 7, 8, 9
New Plant Sciences Facilities Opening, October 15
Arboretum Events

A Message from Dean Neal Van Alfen: Plant Sciences Implementation Committee
A decision has been made to combine the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences’ plant science departments into a single department with three sections. This change will allow exciting opportunities for collaboration and investment in the plant sciences and will sustain UC Davis’ leadership in the field far into the future. While a decision has been made regarding the organization of the plant sciences at a broad level, we now need to address the many issues required for success. I have charged a committee with creating a detailed proposal that ultimately will go to Chancellor Vanderhoef for approval. Vito Polito, chair of the Department of Pomology, has agreed to chair the committee. Other committee members include Steffen Abel, Joe DiTomaso and John Yoder of the Department of Vegetable Crops; Dave Burger and Heiner Lieth of the Department of Environmental Horticulture; Chris van Kessel, Emilio Laca and Ken Tate of the Department of Agronomy and Range Science; and Dee Maddera, Beth Mitcham and Dan Potter of the Department of Pomology. The committee has been asked to address the following points: 1. The name of the department and the three sections. 2. The process by which faculty will self-select into sections, and the function of the sections as peer-groups in the merit and promotion process. 3. A business plan for the department, including budget administration and administrative organization, and offering solutions to the challenges posed by large numbers of faculty housed in different buildings, including efficient and effective business office and IT support. 4. The common management and use of what now are separately-held special facilities (e.g., research lands). 5. The unification of majors under centralized faculty leadership and centralized advising. Special emphasis should be given to opportunities for strengthening or developing curricula that will increase student enrollments in the plant sciences. 6. The highest priority needs for investment in the short-term (using one-time funds) and in the long-term (i.e., FTEs). In addressing this latter point, the committee should avail itself of the work of the “Demographics Committee” to identify vulnerabilities and key areas for staged investment. I recognize that these are large and complex questions. However, in order to meet a target launch date of July 1, 2004, I’ve asked the committee to have its report completed by the end of January 2004. This will allow sufficient time for review by the appropriate college and campus committees that must precede review by the provost and chancellor. To expedite its work, the committee may appoint subcommittees as needed to address various aspects of the planning. As always, we welcome your feedback. If you have questions or comments, please e-mail me.

Neal K. Van Alfen
Dean
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
[email protected]

Back to top ^

Cort Anasasio Beats Summer Heat
Cort Anastasio, associate professor in the Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, and graduate student Eddie Galbavy spent June and July in Greenland, avoiding the Central Valley's summer heat. The pair are part of a group of scientists studying snow photochemistry at Summit, the highest point on the Greenland ice sheet, at an altitude of 10,500 feet. The researchers' goal is to find out how sunlight-initiated reactions in the snow affect the composition of the snow and the atmosphere above it. These reactions are important because they alter ice core records of past atmospheres and could affect air quality in seasonally snow-covered regions of North America. Last weather report had the ice sheet’s thermometer pegged at a balmy 16 degrees Fahrenheit. These intrepid scientists will return to Greenland in April, when temperatures average around -68.

Postcard from Greenland


Back to top ^

Jim Millam’s Lab is for the Birds
The work of Rebecca Fox, graduate student in animal science professor Jim Millam’s lab, appeared in Science News Online. Fox studied neophobia in orange-winged Amazon parrots. According to the article, Fox “found that changing toys frequently in a parrot’s cage may reduce the bird’s tendency to fear new things.”


Back to top ^

Eat Less at Mid-life, Live Longer
The San Francisco Chronicle reported on a new study of middle-aged flies suggesting that altering one’s mid-life diet can help a person live longer. James Carey, professor in the Department of entomology, says this is an important study, but further research is needed to determine whether it is the lean diet alone or other related factors that lead to longer life. Carey was also quoted briefly in a front-page New York Times article.

San Francisco Chronicle
The New York Times


Back to top ^

Slacker Bacteria Punished
Life Science Weekly reported that a UC Davis research team found that some legumes penalize nitrogen-stingy bacteria. Ford Denison, professor in the Department of Agronomy and Range Science, said "In the case of soybeans, it appears that the plant applies sanctions against rhizobia that don't provide nitrogen. The plant does this by decreasing the oxygen supply to the rhizobia….In this way, the host plant can control the environment of the symbiotic bacteria to favor the evolution of cooperation by ensuring that bacterial 'cheaters' reproduce less."

Life Science Weekly


Back to top ^

A Chocolate a Day Keeps the Doctor Away
The benefits of moderate chocolate intake to short-term cardio-vascular health were the subject of a Los Angeles Times article that quoted Carl Keen, chair of the Department of Nutrition. Keen said, "If you can find food products that help vascular health, that people find acceptable and palatable, this is huge."

Chocoholics Anonymous


Back to top ^

For Sale: Dolly’s Parent Company
USA Today reported that PPL Therapeutics of Scotland, the company that produced Dolly, the world’s first cloned sheep, is for sale. Alison Van Eenennaam, Cooperative Extension specialist in the Department of Animal Science, says the company had trouble commercializing its technology.

USA Today


Back to top ^

RFP: Agricultural Literacy and Issues Grants
The Hansen Trust requests proposals for its Agricultural Literacy and Issues Competitive Grants Program. High priority will be given to proposals that target issues surrounding farm labor, agricultural-urban interface, water quality and supply, consumer education, and public understanding and support of agriculture. While it is not necessary for projects to be conducted in Ventura County, it should be evident that the project addresses relevant needs of the county. The application deadline is October 24.

Full details and application instructions

Sheri Klittich
Program Administrator
Hansen Trust
[email protected]
(805) 525-9293, x205

Back to top ^

RFP: 2004 IR-4 Biopesticide Research Program
The IR-4 Biopesticides Research Program requests grant proposals for funding of efficacy research, with a special interest in proposals containing biopesticides (rotated with conventional products) as resistance management tools. The amount of funding available for 2004 is $400,000. In 2003, the application success rate was about 44 percent. The application deadline is November 14. Electronic submissions are encouraged.

Full details, including an electronic application


Back to top ^

Natural Reserve System Graduate Research Grants
Applications are being accepted for the Natural Reserve System’s Mildred E. Mathias Graduate Student Research Grants. Proposed projects must be conducted on reserves in the Natural Reserve System. The application deadline is October 22.

More information and application


Back to top ^

RFP: Kearney Foundation of Soil Science
The Kearney Foundation of Soil Science is soliciting research proposals that address its 2001–2006 mission, "Soil Carbon and California Terrestrial Ecosystems." Proposals are due October 1, 2003. Questions concerning proposal preparation should be directed to Kate Scow.

More information and the complete text of the RFP



Back to top ^

Sustainable Agriculture Lecture Series Kick Off, Oct 3
The Science of Sustainable Agriculture: Measuring the Immeasurable lecture series kicks off its fall calendar with “Natural Resource Scarcity and Sustainable Agriculture,” a presentation by economics professor Jeffrey Krautkraemer of Washington State University. The series explores sustainability as it relates to agriculture, the environment, communities and society at large. Each week, leading social, ecological and biological scientists address key issues and topics relevant to agricultural sustainability in California. Fridays, 12:10 – 1 p.m., Plant and Environmental Sciences Building, Room 3001.

Complete schedule and information


Back to top ^

Foods for Health Town Hall Meeting, Oct 4
A town hall meeting co-sponsored by the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, School of Medicine and Division of Biological Sciences will explore faculty interest in Foods for Health. The organizers hope that by developing a common initiative UC Davis will be well positioned to be an international leader in this research and outreach area. Saturday, October 4, 9:00 a.m., Medical Science 1-C, Room 180.

Lori Fulton
Executive Assistant
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
[email protected]
(530) 752-7192

Back to top ^

Annual Plant Faire, Oct 4
This year’s Plant Faire features more than 1,000 varieties of perennials, herbs, trees, vines, bulbs, shrubs, grasses and native plants -- all locally grown and adapted to the Central Valley’s climate. Houseplants and exotics from the Botanical Conservatory will also be available, as will free advice from plant experts. Proceeds support the Arboretum and the Conservatory. Arboretum Nursery at Orchard Park. Member pre-sale 7:00 – 8:00 a.m., Public sale 8:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. 10% discount for members.

More information


Back to top ^

Conservation Tillage Workshops, Oct 7, 8, 9
The Conservation Tillage Workgroup has announced the dates for its annual Conservation Tillage Workshops. The workshops will feature recent experiences with reduced tillage cotton, corn, bean, small grain and tomato production systems in California. These half-day events will be held in Tulare on October 7, in Five Points on October 8, and in Davis on October 9. All meetings run 8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

More information


Back to top ^

New Plant Sciences Facilities Opening, October 15
The College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences will host a celebration of the opening of its new plant sciences facilities on Wednesday, October 15, 10:00 a.m. – Noon. The celebration will feature presentations by, among others, UC Davis Chancellor Larry Vanderhoef and include tours of the Plant Reproductive Biology building, Bowley Plant Science Teaching Center, Core Greenhouse Complex, Genomics Facility and Ralph M. Parsons Plant Transformation Facility. Research displays and the teaching activities of the Student Farm and Children's Garden will be highlighted. An RSVP is requested by October 6, 2003. (530) 752-1606 or [email protected]

Further information


Back to top ^

Arboretum Events
Sept. 27, 11:00 a.m., Guided Tour: Plant Faire Preview Tour Meet at the Arboretum Terrace Sept. 28, 2:00 p.m., Guided Tour: Plant Faire Preview Tour Meet at the Gazebo Oct. 1, 11:00 a.m., Guided Tour: Landscape Gardening with California Native Plants Meet at the Buehler Alumni & Visitor Center Oct. 4, 7:00 a.m., Annual Plant Faire Arboretum Nursery at Orchard Park Oct. 5, 2:00 p.m., Guided Tour: Great Oaks in the Shields Grove Meet at the Gazebo Oct. 8, Noon, Walk with Warren Roberts, Arboretum Superintendent Meet on the south steps of Mrak Hal

For More Information:
Click Here


Back to top ^



Visit CA&ES Currents online at http://caes.ucdavis.edu/NewsEvents/currents

.

 

CA&ES Currents, the faculty/staff newsletter of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at UC Davis, is distributed every other Friday. News deadline is noon Monday preceding Friday publication. Send inquiries to Ann Filmer, [email protected]

.

 

Issue Editor:

 

Bob Debarge

 

[email protected]

 

 

Contributors: Donna Gutierrez, Thomas Kaiser, Susan Kancir, Rhoda McKnight, Neal Van Alfen, John Weston.

 

Some Web links cited in this newsletter may be inaccessible to off-campus sites. If you want to view the full stories on the Web from off campus, you will need to provide a username and password the first time you try to view a story: username: clips password: newz

 

To be added to or deleted from this electronic newsletter list, please write to [email protected]

.

 

The University of California does not discriminate in any of its policies, procedures or practices. The university is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer.

 

Student News

Design It, Build It

Aug 21, 2015 Truscott donation allows landscape architecture students to dig in.

Student News - More Student News…
Research News

UC Davis Receives Unique, $1.5 Million Gift from Aggie Couple

Jul 07, 2016 Michael and Joelle Hurlston have pledged $1.5 million to endow a first-of-its-kind chair position.

Research News - More Research News…
Outreach News

Summer Internships

Jul 28, 2015 CA&ES students and Salinas Valley employers find common ground.

Outreach News - More Outreach News…