CA&ES Currents Newsletter  icon newspaper

August 06, 2004

Jun 03, 2014 admin


WHO
Kenneth Brown Awarded Freedom to Discover Grant
Bryce Falk Elected APS Fellow
Krishna Subbarao Receives APS Award
James Hill Elected ASA Fellow
John Constantine Named ASUCD Educator of the Year

IN THE NEWS
Plant Photorespiration – More than Meets the Eye
Hatcheries Fail to Breed Salmon with Instincts
Levee Soil Contaminant Still a Concern
Butterfly Invasion in the Sierra Nevada
On Food Labels and Trans Fats

WHAT
Brewing Expert Examines Health Potential of Beer
Wildlife Ecologist 'Howdy' Howard Publishes Memoir

WHAT
RMI Lectureship Series Inaugural Lecture, Sept. 30, 2004
Environmental Health Scientists Conference, Aug. 30, 2004
Cultivating a Sustainable Agricultural Workplace, Sept. 12-14, 2004
"Fili Italiani: A Thousand Years of Needlework,” July – Sept., 2004
Arboretum Events

Kenneth Brown Awarded Freedom to Discover Grant
Kenneth Brown, professor, Department of Nutrition, has been awarded a Freedom-to-Discover grant to conduct research that will advance the application of innovative genetic technologies to help solve dilemmas facing international nutrition. Ten grants were provided for unrestricted biomedical research to 10 leading research institutions throughout the world by the Bristol-Myers Squibb Company and foundation. Brown is also director of the Program in International Nutrition, which focuses on the effects of nutritional status on health outcomes and the design, implementation and evaluation of interventions to improve human nutrition and health in resource-poor communities.

Kenneth Brown
Department of Nutrition
[email protected]
(530) 752-1992

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Bryce Falk Elected APS Fellow
Bryce Falk, professor, Department of Plant Pathology, was elected a fellow of the American Phytopathological Society (APS). This designation is bestowed upon society members for distinguished contributions to plant pathology or to APS. Falk’s research program has made significant contributions in several areas of plant virology and plant pathology. The most noteworthy of these accomplishments dealt with the biology, molecular genetic analysis, taxonomy, and virus-vector relationships of tenuiviruses and criniviruses. Falk was recently named a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



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Krishna Subbarao Receives APS Award
Krishna Subbarao, specialist in Cooperative Extension, received the Syngenta Award from the American Phytopathological Society (APS) at the society’s annual meeting on August 1 in Anaheim, Calif. This award is given to an APS member for an outstanding recent contribution to teaching, research or extension in plant pathology. Krishna’s research focus is epidemiology and integrated control of fungal diseases of vegetables.



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James Hill Elected ASA Fellow
Extension specialist James Hill, former chair of the Department of Agronomy and Range Science, was elected a fellow of the American Society of Agronomy. The designation is the highest bestowed upon members by the society. Hill is recognized nationally and internationally for work that led to the rapid adoption of newer, higher-yielding rice varieties and innovative weed control practices in California. He contributed to the solution of perplexing environmental problems related to rice production and developed farming practices to prevent herbicide runoff in rice field tailwater, allowing rice growers to reduce pollution by 98 percent.



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John Constantine Named ASUCD Educator of the Year
John Constantine, lecturer, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics (ARE), was granted the 2004 ASUCD Educator of the Year Award by the ASUCD Academic Affairs Commission. The commission bestows this honor upon a single UC Davis educator who uniquely impacts the lives of UC Davis students and exceptionally contributes to academics on campus through teaching. Constantine, who received his Ph.D. in agricultural economics from UC Davis in 1993, has taught courses in economic theory, econometrics, managerial marketing, finance, and environmental and natural resource economics.



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Plant Photorespiration – More than Meets the Eye
A new UC Davis study suggests that there is more to photorespiration, a biological process in plants, than previously thought and that attempts to genetically minimize its activity in crop plants would be ill advised. Arnold Bloom, professor, Department of Vegetable Crops, and lead researcher on the study, said, "…our research shows that photorespiration enables the plant to take inorganic nitrogen in the form of nitrate and convert it into a form that is useful for plant growth."

ScienceDaily.com


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Hatcheries Fail to Breed Salmon with Instincts
Jason Watters, a researcher in the Department of Environmental Science and Policy, contrasts the behavioral differences between wild and hatchery Coho salmon. "Domestic hatchery salmon don't behave right," Watters said. “They orient themselves toward the surface as juveniles instead of hiding safely at the bottom of the stream, they're oblivious to predators such as birds and large mammals overhead….”

San Francisco Chronicle


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Levee Soil Contaminant Still a Concern
Confusion between state water officials and the Port of Stockton has raised concern over whether the port sold contaminated soil to the state Department of Water Resources, the agency that used the dirt to shore up a Delta levee. Port of Stockton officials say the material sold to the state is safe. “But the tests done by the port do not measure whether metals could leach out of the dirt in sufficient quantities to harm aquatic species,” said Robert Zasoski, professor, Department of Land, Air, and Water Department.

San Joaquin Record


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Butterfly Invasion in the Sierra Nevada
Millions of California Tortoiseshell butterflies currently are heading south along the Sierra Nevada crest. "It's one of the top five Tortoiseshell migrations in the last 33 years. There may be tens of millions of them," said Arthur Shapiro, professor, Department of Entomology. “The insects - featuring orange-brown wings with large black spots - should reach Yosemite and Sequoia national parks in another two weeks, then descend to the Sierra foothills in late September,” he said.

The Associated Press


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On Food Labels and Trans Fats
Professor Christine Bruhn, director of the Center for Consumer Research, Department of Food Science and Technology, says Americans are reading labels. Seventy percent say they study them before they buy something for the first time. “Fewer of them, however, have said they’ve actually changed their behavior. People say they recognize their diet can be healthier, but the factor that primarily influences what you're going to choose is how much you enjoy the food, what is the taste.”

National Public Radio: Morning Edition


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Brewing Expert Examines Health Potential of Beer
In his new book, "Beer: Health and Nutrition," Charles Bamforth engages in a “warts and all” discussion of the beverage, which archaeological discoveries suggest has been around for at least 6,000 years. Bamforth is a professor in the Department of Food Science and Technology and a founding faculty member of the Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science. He previously has authored the books, "Beer: Tap Into the Art and Science of Brewing" and "Standards of Brewing."

UC Davis News

Charles W. Bamforth
Professor
Department of Food Science and Technology
[email protected]
(530) 752-1467

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Wildlife Ecologist 'Howdy' Howard Publishes Memoir
In his recently published memoir, "Saved by Bed Bugs," Walter "Howdy" Howard, professor emeritus in the Department of Wildlife, Fish and Conservation Biology, provides a wide-ranging account of his adventures, including his experience as a ski trooper during World War II, his work against typhus in Burma and his often controversial ideas about wildlife management.

UC Davis News


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RMI Lectureship Series Inaugural Lecture, Sept. 30, 2004
The Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science (RMI) will kick-off it’s inaugural Lectureship Series on September 30, 2004, with a program of speakers representing the food and wine industries, a luncheon and evening social. Clare Hasler, executive director, says, “The unique dimension of the RMI is the combination of wine and food sciences. The purpose of the RMI Lectureship Series is to bring to campus leaders from these disciplines to discuss critical issues facing these industries and also provide a forum for discussion with faculty, students and invited guests.

RMI Inaugural Lecture Program



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Environmental Health Scientists Conference, Aug. 30, 2004
The Sixth Annual UC Davis Conference for Environmental Health Scientists: “Early Determinants of Adult Health” will be held in Napa, Calif. on August 30, 2004. The event is co-sponsored by NIEHS Center for Environmental Health Sciences, Center for Children's Environmental Health, and the NIEHS Center for Children's Environmental Health.

Information and registration



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Cultivating a Sustainable Agricultural Workplace, Sept. 12-14, 2004
Deadlines are approaching for the PNASH / WCAHS collaborative annual conference, “Cultivating a Sustainable Agricultural Workplace”, in Portland, Oregon, Sept. 12-14, 2004. This event will address how occupational health and safety can be integrated into sustainable agriculture practices.

Deadlines:
August 11 Hotel Conference Rate
August 13 Poster Abstracts & Early Registration

General Information

Conference questions:
1-800-330-0827

Registration questions:
1-800-326-7568


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"Fili Italiani: A Thousand Years of Needlework,” July – Sept., 2004
The Design Museum at UC Davis currently is featuring a show of Italian needle art, created by Via de Marchi Micheli of Sacramento. "Fili Italiani: A Thousand Years of Needlework," which runs from July 25 – September 17, features pieces that range from a fragment of white cutwork from the 14th century to lace and embroidery from the 20th century. "I don't remember a time when I was not aware of this beautiful artwork," Micheli said.

Sacramento Bee



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Arboretum Events

All tours meet at 10 a.m. at the Buehler Alumni and Visitors Center on campus.
All events free and open to the public.

 

Aug. 15, Guided tour: Exploring the Redwood Grove

 

Aug. 29, Guided tour: China's Dawn Redwood in Davis-Lessons in Natural and Human Selection

 

 

Sept. 12, Guided tour: Great Adaptations-Secrets of Survival for the Coast Redwood

 

UC Davis Arboretum
(530) 752-4880
http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.htm


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Visit CA&ES Currents online at http://caes.ucdavis.edu/NewsEvents/currents.

CA&ES Currents, the faculty/staff newsletter of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at UC Davis, is distributed every other Friday. News deadline is noon Monday preceding Friday publication. Send inquiries to Ann Filmer, [email protected].

Issue Editor:
Susan Kancir
(530) 752-5597
[email protected]

Contributors: Donna Gutierrez, Thomas Kaiser, Susan Kancir, Rhoda McKnight, Neal Van Alfen, John Weston.

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