CA&ES Currents Newsletter  icon newspaper

December 17, 2004

Jun 03, 2014 admin


WHO
Mary Delany Helps Crack Chicken Genome
Cover Stories Feature our Faculty
Introducing the Humphrey Fellows of 2004-05
CA&ES Currents Welcomes New Editor

IN THE NEWS
Sacramento Transportation Planning: Robert Johnston Provides Alternative
Bovine Bubbles Filled with Data: Frank Mitloehner Study Detailed
Scientists Track Tahoe Clarity Loss: Charles Goldman Cites Progress
The Hazards of Haze: Thomas Cahill Quoted
Bee-Killing Mites Impact Almond Growers: Eric Mussen Has the Buzz
Rain Has Ants on the Move: Philip Ward Comments

WHAT
CA&ES Executive Committee Online
CA&ES IMPACT Online
Stephen Brush Collaborates on New Biodiversity Book
National Academies Programs

WHAT
Fall Commencement, Dec. 19, 2004
New Faculty Brown Bag, Jan. 12, 2005
Chancellor's Brown Bags, Jan. 26 & April 25, 2005
Sudden Oak Death Symposium, Jan. 18 – 21, 2005
National Water Quality Conference, Feb. 7 – 9, 2005
Western Nutrient Management Conference, March 3 – 4, 2005
Arboretum Events

Mary Delany Helps Crack Chicken Genome
Professor Mary Delany, a geneticist in the Department of Animal Science, is part of an international research group that recently sequenced the chicken genome. This first successful sequencing of a livestock or bird species made the cover story of the Dec. 9 issue of the journal Nature.

UC Davis News Service notes that "detailed information about the chicken genome is particularly valuable to researchers because the chicken, in evolutionary terms, is a rather distant relative to humans and other mammals – positioned between humans and fish."

The Los Angeles Times reports, "the chicken data should also be useful medically. The first tumor virus and the first cancer gene were both discovered in chickens. A chicken’s development is very similar to that of a mammal’s, but because it all takes place in an accessible egg it is far easier to study."

UC Davis News
Los Angeles Times



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Cover Stories Feature our Faculty
Kudos to our faculty in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences whose research made the covers of major journals:

Gang Sun, professor in the Division of Textiles and Clothing, is cited in the Industrial Management and Technologies section of Fortune magazine (December 2004) in reference to Medline Industries using his research on antimicrobial polymers to bind chlorine atoms to cotton in their hospital bed sheets. This likely will result in a decline in hospital patients’ infection risks.

Wendy Silk, professor, Department of Land, Air, and Water Resources, co-authored a cover story "Hydraulics of Plant Growth" in the Australian journal Functional Plant Biology (August 2004). She reviewed work from her laboratory on growth-sustaining water potentials and presented new data on root-rhizosphere interactions.

Rebecca Drenovsky, Ph.D. candidate working with Professor James Richards, Department of Land, Air, and Water Resources, published a paper in Plant and Soil (Vol. 259) that was accompanied by cover photos. Their study looked at the differing nutrient needs of natural shrub land vegetation in arid, eastern California and found that co-existing plant species have very different critical nitrogen:phosphorus ratios.

Tim Caro, professor, Department of Wildlife, Fish and Conservation Biology, published a paper in Behavioral Ecology (Vol. 14, 2003). Featured on the cover, the work is the first study to systematically investigate coat colors in ungulate animals. Very little research has been done on the reasons why mammals have different colored skin and fur.

Gang Sun
[email protected]
(530) 752-0840

 

Wendy Silk
[email protected]
(530) 752-0686

 

James Richards
[email protected]
(530) 752-0170

 

Timothy Caro
[email protected]
(530) 752-0596


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Introducing the Humphrey Fellows of 2004-05
This year, CA&ES hosts five of the nine UC Davis Humphrey Fellows. The Humphrey Program seeks to provide accomplished international professionals a shared experience of American culture and current U.S. approaches to the fields in which they work, as a basis for lasting ties between the U.S. and other countries. This year’s fellows are:

Farid Ahmad, Afghanistan
Mentor: Professor Patrick Brown
Department of Plant Sciences (formerly the Dept. of Pomology)

Malick Diene, Senegal
Mentor: Associate Professor Joan Ogden
Department of Environmental Science and Policy

Khaing Maw, Myanmar/Burma
Mentor: Professor Frank Hirtz
Department of Human and Community Development

Suman Sijapati, Nepal
Mentor: Professor Wesley Wallender
Department of Land, Air and Water Resources

Di Yu, China
Mentor: Professor Ruihong Zhang
Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering


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CA&ES Currents Welcomes New Editor
Ann King Filmer has joined the CA&ES Dean’s Office as a senior writer and is the new editor of CA&ES Currents. Previously she was a farm advisor in San Mateo County. Additional contributors are Susan Kancir (writing), John Weston (online version), Donna Gutierrez (distribution) and Thomas Kaiser (content review). Rhoda McKnight, Director of Communications oversees all print and electronic publications for the Dean’s Office.

Faculty and staff are invited to submit news items for CA&ES Currents to Ann Filmer. An electronic version of CA&ES Currents is at www.caes.ucdavis.edu/News/Currents/Default.cfm.

Ann King Filmer
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
[email protected]
(530) 754-6788

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Sacramento Transportation Planning: Robert Johnston Provides Alternative
Robert Johnston, a professor in the Department of Environmental Science and Policy, helped develop an alternative long-range transportation plan for the Sacramento region aimed at reducing auto use. The Environmental Council of Sacramento (ECOS) enlisted Johnston to develop an environmentally friendly regional transportation and land-use plan that could go up against the "Sacramento Region Blueprint Project" proposed by Sacramento Area Council of Governments. This could impact how $1 billion a year in transportation construction funds may be spent.

Sacramento Business Journal


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Bovine Bubbles Filled with Data: Frank Mitloehner Study Detailed
This story describes the bovine-bubble research of Frank Mitloehner, specialist in Cooperative Extension, in the Department of Animal Science. He is monitoring the gases produced by dairy cows penned in plastic domes. His work could impact regulations on dairy practices in California, the nation’s leading dairy state.

Visalia Times-Delta


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Scientists Track Tahoe Clarity Loss: Charles Goldman Cites Progress
"We're really making progress toward solving Tahoe's problem at a rate we haven't seen at previous times," said Charles Goldman, professor in the Department of Environmental Science and Policy and founder of the UC Davis Tahoe Research Group. “Most important is that the scientific brain power is being assembled in the Tahoe Basin to really meet the difficult complex problems." Also quoted is Geoffrey Schladow, director of the UC Davis Tahoe Environmental Research Center.

Tahoe Daily Tribune


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The Hazards of Haze: Thomas Cahill Quoted
Thomas Cahill, professor emeritus in the Department of Land, Air and Water Resources is cited on tiny particles in Sacramento Valley air that may be more harmful to human health than ozone, potentially causing heart disease and respiratory problems. "On these hazy days of winter when you can't see very far, what you're seeing are these fine particles. They scatter light," said Cahill. He also noted that the inversion layer in the Sacramento Valley causes more pollutants in winter than summer.

Sacramento Bee


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Bee-Killing Mites Impact Almond Growers: Eric Mussen Has the Buzz
U.S. beekeepers say current pesticides no longer work against mites, which are killing the bees needed to pollinate California's almond crop. Eric Mussen, an extension specialist in the Department of Entomology, says the bee-killing Varroa mites from Asia, first discovered in the United States in 1987, are "almost unconquerable."

Sacramento Bee


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Rain Has Ants on the Move: Philip Ward Comments
Philip Ward, professor in the Department of Entomology, says he believes an early rainfall made ants move indoors. During the month of October, many areas of the state were hit by triple-the-normal rainfall, followed by a colder-than-usual November. This article provides interesting comparisons of the native California ants and their Argentinean cousins who compete for food and space in gardens and households.

Los Angeles Times


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CA&ES Executive Committee Online
The monthly agendas and minutes of CA&ES Executive Committee meetings are now posted on the college Web site. CA&ES Currents newsletter will publish this link and reminders of upcoming meetings as a regular feature. Be sure to bookmark this link:

http://caes.ucdavis.edu/FacStaff/ExcCom.htm


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CA&ES IMPACT Online
The Communications Unit, an arm of the College Advancement Team, announces a new Web format for IMPACT, a monthly publication of the Dean’s Office. Check it out online at www.caes.ucdavis.edu/News/Impact/Default.htm. It can also be accessed by going directly to the CA&ES Web site home page, then choosing “News” and then, CA&ES Impact on the drop-down menu.


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Stephen Brush Collaborates on New Biodiversity Book
Accessing Biodiversity and Sharing the Benefits: Lessons from Implementing the Convention on Biological Diversity is a book recently published as a result of a collaboration between the Genetic Resources Conservation Program (GRCP, a UC ANR Statewide Program) and the World Conservation Union.

Collaborators were Stephen Brush, professor in the Department of Human and Community Development, Brian Wright, UC Berkeley, and Santiago Carrizosa, a research ecologist with GRCP. The book gives a comparative analysis of national access and benefit-sharing laws and policies in the Pacific Rim countries that signed the Convention on Biological Diversity. The pdf version of the book is available at the following Web sites:

GRCP
http://www.grcp.ucdavis.edu/projects/ABSProjdex.htm

IUCN Environmental Law Program
http://www.iucn.org/themes/law/

Patrick E. McGuire, director, GRCP
[email protected]
(530) 754-8503


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National Academies Programs
The National Research Council (NRC) of the National Academies announces the Postdoctoral and Senior Research Associateship Programs for 2005.

Program and application information:
www.national-academies.org/rap.

Submission deadline: Feb. 1, 2005

Information for prospective applicants, contact:

National Academies
[email protected]
(202) 334-2760


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Fall Commencement, Dec. 19, 2004
Fall Commencement for the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences will be held Sunday, Dec. 19, 2 p.m. in the UC Davis Recreation Hall Pavilion. This ceremony will be shared with the Division of Biological Sciences and the College of Engineering. A morning graduation ceremony will be held for the College of Letters and Sciences.

CA&ES commencement Web site


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New Faculty Brown Bag, Jan. 12, 2005
New faculty are invited to a New Faculty Brown Bag session hosted by the Office of the Provost on Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2005 from 12 noon – 1:30 p.m. in 203 Mrak Hall. The topic is “Grantsmanship.” Presenters will be Lynne Chronister, associate vice chancellor, Research, and Suad Joseph, professor in the Department of Anthropology. Information will be provided on obtaining grants and funding for research.

RSVP to Lenore Myers at [email protected].

Schedule of Brown Bags for academic year: http://academicpersonnel.ucdavis.edu/td_fac_newfac_brownbag.cfm (Click on “Updates to the New Faculty Brown Bag Schedule for 2004 - 2005”)

Binnie Singh
[email protected]
(530) 752-0963


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Chancellor's Brown Bags, Jan. 26 & April 25, 2005
Chancellor Larry Vanderhoef and other campus leaders invite faculty and staff to attend upcoming brown bag chats to find out what’s going on at UC Davis:

Winter quarter Brown Bag: Jan. 26, 12 noon – 1 p.m., MU II, Memorial Union

Spring quarter Brown Bag: April 25, 12 noon – 1 p.m., Cabernet Room, Silo


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Sudden Oak Death Symposium, Jan. 18 – 21, 2005
The second Sudden Oak Death Science Symposium titled "The State of Our Knowledge" will be held in Monterey, Jan. 18 – 21, 2005. It will bring together international researchers working on sudden oak death in order to provide a scientific overview on the current state of knowledge about this plant pathogen in forests, urban, nursery and agricultural settings.

Symposium information and registration:
http://nature.berkeley.edu/forestry/sodsymposium

Katie Palmieri
ANR Information Officer
(510) 847-5482


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National Water Quality Conference, Feb. 7 – 9, 2005
The annual USDA-CSREES National Water Quality Conference will be in San Diego, Feb. 7– 9, with an additional workshop on Feb. 10 for the Conservation Effects Assessment Program.

Priority registration ends Jan. 5, 2005.

Information, registration and hotel details:
http://www.soil.ncsu.edu/swetc/waterconf/main.waterconferenc.htm

Christine French
[email protected]


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Western Nutrient Management Conference, March 3 – 4, 2005
The Western Nutrient Management Conference will be held March 3 – 4, 2005 in Salt Lake City, Utah. The Western Region Nutrient Management Coordinating Committee, comprised of representatives from land-grant universities, public agencies, and private industry, sponsors the event.

Priority registration ends Feb. 11, 2005.

Conference details:
http://cropandsoil.oregonstate.edu/nm/WCC103/wcc103.htm

Phyllis Pates
Program Coordinator
[email protected]


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Arboretum Events
Arboretum guided tours will resume in February. For more information on Arboretum events:

(530) 752-4880
http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.htm


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Visit CA&ES Currents online at http://caes.ucdavis.edu/NewsEvents/currents.

CA&ES Currents, the faculty/staff newsletter of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at UC Davis, is published on the first and third Thursday of each month (in July and August, only on the first Thursday.)

News deadline is noon Monday preceding Thursday publication. Send news items to editor, [email protected].

Issue Editor:
Ann Filmer
(530) 754-6788
[email protected]

Contributors: Ann Filmer, Thomas Kaiser, Rhoda McKnight, Neal Van Alfen, John Weston.

Some Web links cited in this newsletter may be inaccessible to off-campus sites. If you want to view the full stories on the Web from off campus, you will need to provide a username and password the first time you try to view a story: username: clips password: newz

To be added to or deleted from this electronic newsletter list, please write to [email protected].

The University of California does not discriminate in any of its policies, procedures or practices. The university is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer.

 

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