CA&ES Currents Newsletter  icon newspaper

January 23, 2004

Jun 03, 2014 admin


MESSAGE FROM THE DEAN
A Message from Dean Neal Van Alfen: College Curriculum Town Hall Meeting, Feb. 25

WHO
Seed Growers Isolation Pin Map System

IN THE NEWS
Army of the Undocumented
Blackboard Jungle
Unidentified Swimming Objects
West Nile Mosquitoes Show Signs of Pesticide Resistance

WHAT
RFP: Ogawa Tree Fruit and Nut Crop Research Grants
RFP: Viticulture and Enology Research Grants
Agricultural Leadership Development Program
Graduate Student Research Grants: White Mountain Research Station
RFP: Sierra Foothills Research and Extension Center

WHAT
ANR Listening Sessions, Jan. 29 – Feb. 26
College Curriculum Town Hall Meeting, Feb. 25
Arboretum Events

A Message from Dean Neal Van Alfen: College Curriculum Town Hall Meeting, Feb. 25
Over the past year, several committees -- Environmental Biology, Plant Sciences and Sustainable Agriculture -- have studied and made recommendations with regard to updating the college’s curriculum in these areas. I asked the committees to examine undergraduate education in these areas for two reasons: (1) as a college we have many opportunities for teaching in emerging fields of study and (2) adjustments to the state budget are providing the impetus for us to rethink many of our existing programs.

There are many budgetary implications related to how much our college teaches, and it is expected that our I&R FTE and budgets reflect teaching activity. So, in deciding how our college should respond to the recommendations of the various planning committees, it is important that I seek broadly based faculty advice. Therefore, I am convening a town meeting so that we may discuss new curriculum initiatives for our college. The meeting -- February 25, 3–5 p.m., East Conf. Rm., MU -- is open to all faculty members and Cooperative Extension personnel -- and I encourage you all to participate.

During the meeting, I’d like to focus on the recommendations of these three committees related to development of new courses and curricula, particularly since there is potential overlap between the recommendations regarding curricula in the plant sciences, environmental biology and sustainable agriculture. With the changes that are occurring in the curriculum offered by the Division of Biological Sciences (DBS), it would also be useful to discuss how these changes may affect our programs. A committee chaired by Peter Moyle is representing our college in these DBS curriculum discussions, so broad faculty input would be helpful in their discussions.

If you are unable to attend the meeting but would like to share your views with me or with those in attendance, please e-mail me with your input.

Neal K. Van Alfen
Dean
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
[email protected]

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Seed Growers Isolation Pin Map System
The California Crop Improvement Association and the Seed Biotechnology Center at UC Davis have announced the launch of the California Seed Growers Isolation Pin Map System. This Web-based isolation or “pinning” map is designed to allow seed growers to identify the location and planting date of seed crops produced in California. Users can electronically mark or “pin” fields from their offices to allow real-time tracking of seed production activities.

This map, available to all seed companies and growers, was developed as a result of the financial support and advice of numerous vegetable and field seed companies. The map is not intended to be used to enforce field isolations, but rather as a tool to help growers work cooperatively to place and plant seed fields to assure high genetic purity.

For an extensive overview of the map, visit SeedQuest



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Army of the Undocumented
In an article on the debate over the effects of President Bush’s immigration proposals, the Sacramento Bee used as its lead source Phillip Martin, professor in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics and editor of Migration News. Martin says California will be the state most affected by the administration’s plan. A New York Times story about illegal immigration cites a study by Martin that estimates California employs 1.2 million of the nation’s 2.5 million undocumented farm workers.

Sacramento Bee
New York Times
Migration News


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Blackboard Jungle
The San Francisco Chronicle ran an article on a study of the effects of bullying on teenagers who are harassed in school because they are gay or perceived as gay. Among other things, the study found that harassed students were three times as likely as other students to miss school and more than twice as prone to depression and suicide. Stephen Russell, Cooperative Extension specialist in the Department of Human and Community Development who worked on the study, said "It's the first time we've had information about this kind of harassment and its link to negative health consequences for teenagers."

San Francisco Chronicle


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Unidentified Swimming Objects
In a talk titled “USOs: Unidentified Swimming Objects," sponsored by the Squaw Valley Institute, internationally renowned limnologist Charles Goldman discussed his recent trip to Loch Ness, Scotland, and possible explanations for reports of lake monster sightings both there and in Lake Tahoe, purported home of “Tahoe Tessie.” According to the Tahoe World, Goldman, who is a professor in the Department of Environmental Science and Policy and the foremost expert on Lake Tahoe, offered several possible explanations for the sightings, among them: temperature fluctuations, errant waves, or an exceptionally well-fed sturgeon. No mention was made of Scotch whiskey.

Unidentified Swimming Objects


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West Nile Mosquitoes Show Signs of Pesticide Resistance
The Associated Press reported on the work of Bruce Hammock, professor in the Department of Entomology, who was a co-author of a recent report that found that the mosquito species that spreads West Nile virus appears to be developing resistance to pyrethroids, a common class of pesticides that are relatively environmentally benign. The resistant mosquitoes, of the species culex pipiens, were discovered in Marin County.

Associated Press


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RFP: Ogawa Tree Fruit and Nut Crop Research Grants
The College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences is pleased to announce that the Joseph M. Ogawa Research and Teaching Endowment Committee is accepting proposals from undergraduate and graduate students, and postdoctoral researchers for research projects addressing production problems of temperate zone tree fruit and nut crops. In addition, proposals are requested for educational programs (course development, extension activities and field short courses) benefiting UC students, the fields of plant pathology and pomology and the California fruit and nut industries. Proposals may be submitted by students, staff or faculty. Awards must be expended in support of undergraduates, graduate students, post graduate researchers and faculty/staff within the University of California system. Up to five $1,000 awards are available in 2004. Include a letter of application, a research proposal (of less than 1,500 words) and a letter of support from a UC faculty member or department chair. Address questions and applications (via e-mail attachment) to Rick Swantz. Deadline: February 13, 2004.

Rick A. Swantz
Director of Development
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
[email protected]
(530) 752-7961

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RFP: Viticulture and Enology Research Grants
The California Competitive Grant Program for Research in Viticulture and Enology is requesting research proposals for 2004–2005. The University of California Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources, in consultation and cooperation with the American Vineyard Foundation, established the program in 1997 to address the needs of the California viticulture and enology industry. Deadline: January 30, 2004.

Full details, including application instructions and research priorities click here.


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Agricultural Leadership Development Program
The Experiment Station Committee on Organization and Policy and the Academic Programs Committee on Organization and Policy (ESCOP/ACOP) Leadership Development Program is seeking participants for its 2004–05 agricultural leadership class. The program is designed to enhance the leadership skills of land-grant university faculty and federal employees for the benefit of agriculture and agriculture-related programs. Application deadline: February 15, 2004.

Additional information and application form


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Graduate Student Research Grants: White Mountain Research Station
The University of California’s White Mountain Research Station (WMRS) is accepting applications for its 2004 graduate student research awards. The awards provide up to $2,000 per year to support living and travel expenses for thesis research based at its research station in the White-Inyo mountains. Living expenses may include room and board at WMRS and limited support for living in the field. The awards are renewable. Application deadline: March 1, 2004

Complete information and application forms are available here


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RFP: Sierra Foothills Research and Extension Center
The University of California’s Sierra Foothill Research and Extension Center (SFREC) is soliciting proposals for new and continuing research for the upcoming program year, May 1, 2004 – April 30, 2005. The center expects to award approximately 4,000 hours of labor to assist continuing and new research projects. The center is comprised of 5,721 acres of northern Sierra foothill oak woodland-annual grass rangeland. Several watersheds fall within its boundaries, and the Yuba River flows along the southern edge, offering opportunities for water-quality and riparian-habitat studies. There are 160 acres of irrigated pasture, with a herd of 350 beef cows and 100 yearling calves. Other resources include a weather station, GIS database, and other long-term databases related to hardwoods and annual rangeland pasture use by cattle; beef cattle fertility, disease and production levels; stream hydrology in managed watersheds; climate and range forage yields. Facilities include a laboratory for chemical and biological analyses, meeting rooms, a 13-bed dormitory and six cattle-working areas. Application deadline: March 8, 2004.

Online proposal forms

Mike O'Connor
Superintendent
UC Sierra Foothill Research and Extension Center
[email protected]
(530) 639-8803

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ANR Listening Sessions, Jan. 29 – Feb. 26
The University of California’s Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources (ANR) is sponsoring a series of listening sessions to solicit stakeholders’ input on ANR, its programs and ways in which it can better address the needs of Californians. Sessions are set for the following dates and locations:

January 29 – San Luis Obispo (Veteran's Hall, 801 Grand Ave.)
February 5 – Riverside (UC Riverside Extension, 1200 University Ave.)
February 10 – Redding (Best Western Hilltop Inn, 2300 Hilltop Dr.)
February 19 – Parlier (Kearney Research & Extension Center, 9240 S. Riverbend Ave.)
February 26 – Davis (Buehler Alumni & Visitors Center, corner of Old Davis Rd. / Mrak Hall Dr., UC Davis)

Full details, including ANR’s mandatory pre-registration form, are available at http://ucanr.org/internal/internalstories/listening2.shtml. Each session will be limited to 100 people.


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College Curriculum Town Hall Meeting, Feb. 25
The College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences will hold a curriculum town hall meeting on Wednesday, February 25, 3–5 p.m., East Conf. Rm., MU. Details of the meeting are covered in Dean Neal Van Alfen’s message above.


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Arboretum Events
Feb. 4, 11:00 a.m., Guided Tour: Focus on Mediterranean Gardening
Meet at the Arboretum Terrace Garden

Feb. 7, 11:00 a.m., Guided Tour: Passing By -- Birds that Visit us During Migration
Meet at Arboretum Headquarters

Feb. 8, 2:00 p.m., Guided Tour: Gold in Winter -- Acacias
Meet at Arboretum Headquarters

For More Information:
UC Davis Arboretum
(530) 752-4880

http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.htm


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Visit CA&ES Currents online at http://caes.ucdavis.edu/NewsEvents/currents.

CA&ES Currents, the faculty/staff newsletter of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at UC Davis, is distributed every other Friday. News deadline is noon Monday preceding Friday publication. Send inquiries to Ann Filmer, [email protected].

Issue Editor:
Bob Debarge

[email protected]

Contributors: Donna Gutierrez, Thomas Kaiser, Susan Kancir, Rhoda McKnight, Neal Van Alfen, John Weston.

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