CA&ES Currents Newsletter  icon newspaper

June 04, 2004

Jun 03, 2014 admin


WHO
Judith Stern Receives Prestigious USDA Award
Joy Mench Recognized with Poultry Welfare Research Award
Anita Oberbauer Honored with Companion Animal Biology Award

IN THE NEWS
Forest Restoration is Fire Prevention
Action Against Mountain Lion May Have Saved Lives
Lake Tahoe Clarity Declined in 2003
Landmark Water Pact Expected In California
Effective Fiber: How Much is Too Much TDN?

WHAT
Converting Urban Waste to Usable Products
Conference Reflects Unique Partnership
New Book on Offshoring of Manufacturing Jobs

WHAT
Friends of Environmental Toxicology Day, June 4, 2004
2004 Annual CA&ES Spring Meeting, June 10, 2004
Arboretum Events

Judith Stern Receives Prestigious USDA Award
Judith Stern, professor, Department of Nutrition, is the recipient of a 2004 Secretary's Honor Award, the most prestigious award presented by the US Department of Agriculture. The award recognizes outstanding contributions to agriculture, to the consumers of agricultural products, and to the ability of the USDA to serve rural America. The award, to be presented in Washington D.C. on June 25, 2004, is given to Stern in the category of “Improving the Nation’s Nutrition and Health.” Carl Keen, nutrition department chair, said, “…Stern’s efforts have led to new health policy, particularly in the area of obesity and public awareness of nutrition’s importance.”

Judith S. Stern
Professor
Department of Nutrition
[email protected]
(530) 752-6575

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Joy Mench Recognized with Poultry Welfare Research Award
Joy Mench, professor, Department of Animal Science, has been selected as recipient of the 2004 Poultry Welfare Research Award presented by the Poultry Science Association (PSA). The award will be formally presented at the national PSA meeting this July. Mench is an acknowledged national leader in welfare teaching, research, and policy of agricultural animals. She is the sole non-veterinarian to sit on the Council for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care, the national oversight group for animals used in teaching, research and outreach. Mench was recognized by the Humane Society of the United States with its national 2002 Animals and Society Award.

Joy A. Mench
Department of Animal Science
[email protected]
(530) 752-7125

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Anita Oberbauer Honored with Companion Animal Biology Award
Anita Oberbauer, professor, Department of Animal Science, is the recipient of the 2004 Corbin Companion Animal Biology Award given by the American Society of Animal Science (ASAS). This national award is presented annually to one researcher in recognition of her contributions to companion animal biology. Oberbauer's accomplishments in research have focused on genetic disorders in dogs. When Animal Science added companion animals to its curriculum, Oberbauer stepped forward to develop new courses. The curriculum she developed has become the model used by other universities. In 2002, Oberbauer received the UC Davis Distinguished Teaching Award.

Anita M. Oberbauer
Professor
Department of Animal Science
[email protected]
(530) 752-4997

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Forest Restoration is Fire Prevention
“A restored forest is the first and most important line of defense against wildfire,” says, Thomas Bonnicksen, visiting professor in the Department of Environmental Horticulture, in his commentary on approaches for dealing with the California wildfire crisis (Contra Costa Times). In a related Los Angeles Times front page story, Bonnicksen comments on his recent examination of Big Bear Lake, "I saw a level of tree mortality greater than I anticipated, and a dying forest with homes and businesses inside it," he said. Dr. Bonnicksen developed science-based strategies in 1994 and 1995 to deal with the wildfire threat in San Bernardino Mountain forests and San Diego County brushlands of California. He served on the Congressional fact-finding mission for the 1988 Yellowstone fires and the 2003 Southern California wildfires.

Dr. Bonnicksen Bio

Contra Costa Times
The Los Angeles Times


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Action Against Mountain Lion May Have Saved Lives
Palo Alto police stood by their decision to kill a mountain lion as it reclined in a neighborhood tree last week. Lee Fitzhugh, wildlife management specialist, Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Conservation Biology, said that “a tranquilizer would not have sedated the mountain lion right away, and it could have jumped out of the tree and escaped -- too big a risk with three elementary schools nearby.”

San Jose Mercury News


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Lake Tahoe Clarity Declined in 2003
Following several years of incremental improvement, Lake Tahoe's clarity declined in 2003, researchers at the UC Davis Tahoe Research Group announced at the Tahoe Research Symposium this month. However, the decline was considered within normal ranges of the natural cycle of ups and downs. “I view this as neither good nor bad news, but it reaffirms the critical need for processes such as the Environmental Impact Program, the Tahoe Maximum Daily Load and the Regional Plan Update," said John Reuter, a researcher with the UC Davis Tahoe Research Group.

UC Davis – photo and article
Reno Gazette-Journal
Tahoe Research Group Information:


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Landmark Water Pact Expected In California
The Metropolitan Water District will soon approve a landmark agreement that will divert agricultural waters in two Southern California counties for urban use. “…we live in a Mediterranean, fluctuating climate, and we have to change the use of water to match fluctuating supplies,” says Richard Howitt, professor, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.

The Los Angeles Times


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Effective Fiber: How Much is Too Much TDN?
The Department of Animal Science’s Professor Richard Zinn and Extension dairy specialist, Peter Robinson are quoted extensively in this California Farmer article on the balance of fiber and nutrients in beef and dairy cattle feed.

California Farmer


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Converting Urban Waste to Usable Products
Ruihong Zhang, associate professor, and Zhongli Pan, assistant adjunct professor, Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, will collaborate with Richard Evans, specialist in Cooperative Extension, Department of Environmental Horticulture, on a project to develop and commercialize a bioconversion technology that potentially could convert over 6 million tons per year of California’s organic wastes into multiple valuable products, including 2,800 GWh of electricity per year. The project will involve building a digester system on campus that can process 3-tons of waste per-day and another 25 ton-per-day unit in City of Industry, California. The project, funded by the California Energy Commission and industry collaborators, is expected to have significant implications for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and offer environmental protection, public health benefits and renewable energy production.

Ruihong Zhang
Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering
[email protected]
(530) 754-9530

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Conference Reflects Unique Partnership
“Bringing Functionality to the Market” was the theme of the recent California Institute of Food and Agricultural Research (CIFAR) conference, held in partnership with the UC Davis Office of Research and UC Davis CONNECT (a program focused on technology and entrepreneurship). Held on May 25-26 in Sacramento, this conference addressed food functionality in terms of flavor, health, and well being with a focus on food technology. Sharon Shoemaker, executive director of CIFAR, organized the conference, which featured 30+ national and international presenters, including 12 faculty from the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, representing the departments of Nutrition, Vegetable Crops, Food Science and Technology, and Animal Science.



(See: CIFAR Conference XIX - Bringing Functionality to Market)
UC Davis News
Conference Information


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New Book on Offshoring of Manufacturing Jobs
Martin Kenney, professor, Department of Human and Community Development, has co-edited a new book that studies the trends in the movement of U.S. manufacturing jobs to other countries. The Sacramento Business Journal featured a write-up on his new book, Locating Global Advantage: Industry and Dynamics in the International Economy. Kenney recently addressed the National Academy of Engineering in Washington, D.C. on his research related to the off shoring of service and research jobs to India. He also addressed the American Legislative Exchange Council, comprised of state legislators, in Austin, Texas.

Sacramento Business Journal
UC Davis News


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Friends of Environmental Toxicology Day, June 4, 2004
The annual “Friends of Environmental Toxicology Day,” hosted by the Department of Environmental Toxicology, will occur Friday, June 4, 2004, on campus in the Robert Mondavi Center Studio Theater. This event, open to the general public, members of industry, state agencies and environmental groups, offers an opportunity to share research, ideas and concerns about environmental issues affecting Northern California.

Free admission. Registration required.

Schedule and Registration
“Friends” Information


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2004 Annual CA&ES Spring Meeting, June 10, 2004
The College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences will hold its annual spring meeting on June 10, 2004, 4-6 p.m. in the AGR Room, Buehler Alumni Center. All faculty are encouraged to attend.

Sharon A. Berg
Administrative Specialist
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
[email protected]
(530) 752-3483

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Arboretum Events

May 29, 11 a.m., Tour: Edible Plants in the Arboretum
Meet at Putah Creek Lodge.

May 30, 2 p.m., Tour: Too Hot for Flowers? Garden With Texture and Foliage
Meet at the Gazebo

Information:

 

UC Davis Arboretum
(530) 752-4880
http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.htm


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Visit CA&ES Currents online at http://caes.ucdavis.edu/NewsEvents/currents.

CA&ES Currents, the faculty/staff newsletter of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at UC Davis, is distributed every other Friday. News deadline is noon Monday preceding Friday publication. Send inquiries to Ann Filmer, [email protected].

Issue Editor:
Susan Kancir
(530) 752-5597
[email protected]

Contributors: Donna Gutierrez, Thomas Kaiser, Susan Kancir, Rhoda McKnight, Neal Van Alfen, John Weston.

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