CA&ES Currents Newsletter  icon newspaper

April 21, 2005

May 29, 2014 admin


MESSAGE FROM THE DEAN
A Message from Dean Van Alfen: New Development Officers

WHO
Alison Van Eenennaam: USDA Advisory Committee

IN THE NEWS
Spotlight: Student Plan for the Student Resource Center
UC Davis Joins New Food Safety Network
The Cost of Obesity in the Workplace: Judith Stern Counters
Vernal Pools Provide Wildlife Habitat: Robbin Thorp Comments
Birds With West Nile Virus

WHAT
Publication: “If My Child is Overweight…”
CA&ES Executive Committee Online

WHAT
Wine & the Mind: International Symposium
Annual CA&ES Spring Meeting, June 9, 2005
Arboretum Events

A Message from Dean Van Alfen: New Development Officers
As the campus enters into its first comprehensive campaign, our college has a tremendous opportunity to expand the scope and vitality of the college through donor partnerships. To increase our efforts in the campaign, we have added two new directors of major gifts to our College Advancement Team – Allison Chilcott and Melissa Haworth. We now have four development officers, following the retirement of Rick Swantz.

You will have the opportunity to meet all four of these development officers during the course of the campaign. You may have the opportunity to work directly with some of them and to get their input on fundraising strategies. Their combined expertise will be invaluable in helping us meet our college’s goals during the comprehensive campaign.

Our development officers:

Christine Schmidt, director of major gifts. Christine is a UC Davis alumna with a bachelor’s degree in international relations. She received a master’s degree in nonprofit administration from the University of San Francisco. Her background includes development work with several nonprofit organizations, most recently the Water Education Foundation, the American River Parkway Foundation, East Bay Agency for Children, and Sierra Club’s National Headquarters.

Oliver Ramsey, director of campaign initiatives. Oliver began his fundraising career at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Oliver has worked on campus campaigns as a major gifts officer at Illinois Institute of Technology and the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana. His undergraduate degree was earned at Davidson College and he holds a certificate in fundraising management from the Fundraising School at Indiana University. He and his wife live in Napa and he is a graduate of the Leadership Napa Valley program.

Allison Chilcott, director of major gifts. Allison is a UC Davis alumna, with a bachelor’s degree in sociology. She received the UC Davis Chancellor’s Award of Merit and the Community Service Award. Allison earned a master’s degree in health policy and management from The Johns Hopkins School of Public Health. For the past four years, Allison worked as the vice president for development and educational programs at the California Biomedical Research Association in Sacramento.

Melissa Haworth, director of major gifts. Melissa graduated from UC Davis with a bachelor’s degree in biological sciences and is pursuing a master’s of business administration at the UC Davis Graduate School of Management. For the past seven years, she has been a program manager for the Cal Aggie Alumni Association, working with alumni leaders, parents, students, and friends of the university. Melissa served as adviser for CASAN, the Cal Aggie Student Alumni Network.

As always, I value your feedback. If you have questions or comments, please e-mail me.

Neal K. Van Alfen
Dean
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
[email protected]

Back to top ^

Alison Van Eenennaam: USDA Advisory Committee
Alison Van Eenennaam, an animal genomics and biotechnology specialist in the Department of Animal Science, has been selected to serve as a member of the USDA 16568 - Advisory Committee on Biotechnology and 21st Century Agriculture, a national committee addressing issues on biotechnology in agriculture, including international regulations. Department chair Gary Anderson said, “Membership on this prestigious committee is highly selective. Alison’s appointment is an indication of the nationwide respect her Cooperative Extension program has earned in the remarkably short time she has been a specialist in our department.”

Van Eenennaam’s areas of research are the transgenic modification of milk fatty acid composition and triglyceride structure, the development of methods for the biological containment of transgenic fish, and the applied use of biotechnology in animal agricultural systems.

Alison Van Eenennaam
[email protected]
(530) 752-7942
http://animalscience.ucdavis.edu/faculty/VanEenennaam/


Back to top ^

Spotlight: Student Plan for the Student Resource Center
Students in the community and regional development major used their applied research skills and their commitment to community service to help the campus address important issues of design and location for the proposed Student Resource Center (SRC), a center dedicated to the support of student activities. At the request of the Student Programs and Activities Center (SPAC), these undergraduate students successfully completed the first formal assessment of student organization needs for the new resource center. The recommendations that emerged from this project were accepted by SPAC and will be an important component of the ongoing campus dialog about design of the student center. The Department of Human and Community Development has historically had a community-based focus. The teaching program is structured around active student involvement with regional, state, and international issues. Bob Pence, who taught the course “Program Evaluation and the Management of Organizations” (CRD 168) last quarter noted that his course promotes the departmental concepts of applied community leadership. According to Pence, “from a teaching and learning standpoint, this project was a real opportunity for students to wade into the complexities of community program evaluation. On top of that, a very useful product resulted, and the primary client [SPAC] is using it!” Pence is a lecturer and researcher in the Department of Human and Community Development, with an emphasis on community development. Working with Pence and the class on the project were Margaret Ortega, director of SPAC, and Theresa Montemayor, associate director of SPAC.



Back to top ^

UC Davis Joins New Food Safety Network
Hoping to reduce the 76 million cases of food poisoning that occur annually in the United States, UC Davis researchers have joined forces with other food safety experts across the nation to establish a scientific network that will conduct research aimed at preventing such illnesses and respond to outbreaks of food poisoning. The new Food Safety Research and Response Network includes 50 researchers from 18 colleges and universities. It is funded by a $5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Researchers will study disease-causing microbes such as E. coli, Salmonella, and Campylobacter to determine where they occur in the environment, how they are sustained, and how they infect livestock herds. Partners in the project are food microbiologist Linda Harris, Department of Food Science and Technology, postharvest pathologist Trevor Suslow, Department of Plant Sciences, and Ian Gardner, Patricia Conrad, and Bill Sischo, School of Veterinary Medicine.

UC Davis News Service


Back to top ^

The Cost of Obesity in the Workplace: Judith Stern Counters
State health officials released a study concluding that California adults who are physically inactive and obese will cost the state $28 billion this year alone. The Department of Health Services’ study addressed who incurs the cost of obese adults, and who may be motivated to address the health problem.

Judith Stern, professor in the Department of Nutrition and vice president of the American Obesity Association, said that the government should do more. She suggests extending the school day for physical activity and nutrition counseling and requiring a health impact statement on new buildings, focusing on whether the design encourages employees to be sedentary.

Sacramento Bee

Judith S. Stern
Professor
Department of Nutrition
[email protected]
(530) 752-6575

Back to top ^

Vernal Pools Provide Wildlife Habitat: Robbin Thorp Comments
Robbin Thorp, professor emeritus in the Department of Entomology, cited the unique colonies of insects and plants that are dependent on vernal pools. "Some [bees] are so specialized that they visit only one particular type of flower," said Thorp. This close relationship between vernal pool plants and their pollinators means that if either the bee habitat or the vernal pool is lost, both species perish, according to Thorp. A report by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service estimates that 80 to 90 percent of historic wetlands have been lost in California and that "the loss continues unabated.” The article profiles one couple’s commitment to maintain a vernal pool on their 217-acre ranch.

Ventura County Star



Back to top ^

Birds With West Nile Virus
San Mateo County health officials announced the first evidence of West Nile virus activity in the county – a pine siskin tested positive for the mosquito-borne pathogen. The yellow-and-black striped songbird was collected in March in Hillsborough and tested at the UC Davis Center for Vectorborne Diseases.

Positive tests this early in the season may mean significant activity during the summer, when mosquitoes are more active. So far this year, birds have tested positive for the virus in 21 California counties, including Yolo County. Last year the virus killed 28 people in California, mostly in Southern California.

The public is asked to report findings of dead birds to the state Department of Health Services online at www.westnile.ca.gov or by calling (877) 968-2473.

San Jose Mercury News


Back to top ^

Publication: “If My Child is Overweight…”
In a New York Times article providing advice to parents on child nutrition, a UC publication was cited as an excellent guide for parents who have an overweight child. Publication topics include how to prevent a child from overeating, choosing healthy meals and snacks, increasing physical activity, and dealing with self-esteem and stigmatization issues. The publication, "If My Child is Overweight, What Should I Do About It?," is available from the UC Agriculture and Natural Resources catalog: http://anrcatalog.ucdavis.edu.

New York Times


Back to top ^

CA&ES Executive Committee Online
The monthly agendas, minutes, and upcoming meeting dates of the CA&ES Executive Committee are posted on the college Web site: http://caes.ucdavis.edu/FacStaff/ExcCom.htm. The next meeting is May 5, 1:30–3:30 p.m., 2154 Meyer Hall.


Back to top ^

Wine & the Mind: International Symposium
The "Wine & the Mind" international symposium invites scientists and the public to discuss how humans recognize, perceive, and respond to tastes, odors, and chemical irritants, specifically those of food, wine, and spirits. Leading international scientists will present their findings in comprehensible language, supplemented with a guided wine tasting. The symposium is organized by COPIA: The American Center for Wine, Food, and the Arts and the UC Davis Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science. It will be held at COPIA in Napa on May 14–15, 2005. For registration and a schedule of speakers, see: http://www.copia.org/pages/wineandthemind.asp


Back to top ^

Annual CA&ES Spring Meeting, June 9, 2005
The College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences will hold its annual spring meeting on June 9, 2005, 4–6 p.m. in the AGR Room, Buehler Alumni and Visitors Center. All faculty are encouraged to attend.



Back to top ^

Arboretum Events
April 23, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., Spring Plant Sale
Arboretum Nursery at Orchard Park

May 7, 11 a.m., Guided Tour: Spring in the White Flower Garden
Meet at the Gazebo

May 11, 12 noon, Walk with Warren
Meet at the Gazebo

May 14, 11 a.m., Guided Tour: Meet Our California Native Plants
Meet at the Buehler Alumni and Visitors Center

For information on arboretum events, see:
http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.htm


Back to top ^

 


Visit CA&ES Currents online at

MESSAGE FROM THE DEAN
A Message from Dean Van Alfen: New Development Officers

WHO
Alison Van Eenennaam: USDA Advisory Committee

IN THE NEWS
Spotlight: Student Plan for the Student Resource Center
UC Davis Joins New Food Safety Network
The Cost of Obesity in the Workplace: Judith Stern Counters
Vernal Pools Provide Wildlife Habitat: Robbin Thorp Comments
Birds With West Nile Virus

WHAT
Publication: “If My Child is Overweight…”
CA&ES Executive Committee Online

WHAT
Wine & the Mind: International Symposium
Annual CA&ES Spring Meeting, June 9, 2005
Arboretum Events

A Message from Dean Van Alfen: New Development Officers
As the campus enters into its first comprehensive campaign, our college has a tremendous opportunity to expand the scope and vitality of the college through donor partnerships. To increase our efforts in the campaign, we have added two new directors of major gifts to our College Advancement Team – Allison Chilcott and Melissa Haworth. We now have four development officers, following the retirement of Rick Swantz.

You will have the opportunity to meet all four of these development officers during the course of the campaign. You may have the opportunity to work directly with some of them and to get their input on fundraising strategies. Their combined expertise will be invaluable in helping us meet our college’s goals during the comprehensive campaign.

Our development officers:

Christine Schmidt, director of major gifts. Christine is a UC Davis alumna with a bachelor’s degree in international relations. She received a master’s degree in nonprofit administration from the University of San Francisco. Her background includes development work with several nonprofit organizations, most recently the Water Education Foundation, the American River Parkway Foundation, East Bay Agency for Children, and Sierra Club’s National Headquarters.

Oliver Ramsey, director of campaign initiatives. Oliver began his fundraising career at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Oliver has worked on campus campaigns as a major gifts officer at Illinois Institute of Technology and the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana. His undergraduate degree was earned at Davidson College and he holds a certificate in fundraising management from the Fundraising School at Indiana University. He and his wife live in Napa and he is a graduate of the Leadership Napa Valley program.

Allison Chilcott, director of major gifts. Allison is a UC Davis alumna, with a bachelor’s degree in sociology. She received the UC Davis Chancellor’s Award of Merit and the Community Service Award. Allison earned a master’s degree in health policy and management from The Johns Hopkins School of Public Health. For the past four years, Allison worked as the vice president for development and educational programs at the California Biomedical Research Association in Sacramento.

Melissa Haworth, director of major gifts. Melissa graduated from UC Davis with a bachelor’s degree in biological sciences and is pursuing a master’s of business administration at the UC Davis Graduate School of Management. For the past seven years, she has been a program manager for the Cal Aggie Alumni Association, working with alumni leaders, parents, students, and friends of the university. Melissa served as adviser for CASAN, the Cal Aggie Student Alumni Network.

As always, I value your feedback. If you have questions or comments, please e-mail me.

Neal K. Van Alfen
Dean
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
[email protected]

Back to top ^

Alison Van Eenennaam: USDA Advisory Committee
Alison Van Eenennaam, an animal genomics and biotechnology specialist in the Department of Animal Science, has been selected to serve as a member of the USDA 16568 - Advisory Committee on Biotechnology and 21st Century Agriculture, a national committee addressing issues on biotechnology in agriculture, including international regulations. Department chair Gary Anderson said, “Membership on this prestigious committee is highly selective. Alison’s appointment is an indication of the nationwide respect her Cooperative Extension program has earned in the remarkably short time she has been a specialist in our department.”

Van Eenennaam’s areas of research are the transgenic modification of milk fatty acid composition and triglyceride structure, the development of methods for the biological containment of transgenic fish, and the applied use of biotechnology in animal agricultural systems.

Alison Van Eenennaam
[email protected]
(530) 752-7942
http://animalscience.ucdavis.edu/faculty/VanEenennaam/


Back to top ^

Spotlight: Student Plan for the Student Resource Center
Students in the community and regional development major used their applied research skills and their commitment to community service to help the campus address important issues of design and location for the proposed Student Resource Center (SRC), a center dedicated to the support of student activities. At the request of the Student Programs and Activities Center (SPAC), these undergraduate students successfully completed the first formal assessment of student organization needs for the new resource center. The recommendations that emerged from this project were accepted by SPAC and will be an important component of the ongoing campus dialog about design of the student center. The Department of Human and Community Development has historically had a community-based focus. The teaching program is structured around active student involvement with regional, state, and international issues. Bob Pence, who taught the course “Program Evaluation and the Management of Organizations” (CRD 168) last quarter noted that his course promotes the departmental concepts of applied community leadership. According to Pence, “from a teaching and learning standpoint, this project was a real opportunity for students to wade into the complexities of community program evaluation. On top of that, a very useful product resulted, and the primary client [SPAC] is using it!” Pence is a lecturer and researcher in the Department of Human and Community Development, with an emphasis on community development. Working with Pence and the class on the project were Margaret Ortega, director of SPAC, and Theresa Montemayor, associate director of SPAC.



Back to top ^

UC Davis Joins New Food Safety Network
Hoping to reduce the 76 million cases of food poisoning that occur annually in the United States, UC Davis researchers have joined forces with other food safety experts across the nation to establish a scientific network that will conduct research aimed at preventing such illnesses and respond to outbreaks of food poisoning. The new Food Safety Research and Response Network includes 50 researchers from 18 colleges and universities. It is funded by a $5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Researchers will study disease-causing microbes such as E. coli, Salmonella, and Campylobacter to determine where they occur in the environment, how they are sustained, and how they infect livestock herds. Partners in the project are food microbiologist Linda Harris, Department of Food Science and Technology, postharvest pathologist Trevor Suslow, Department of Plant Sciences, and Ian Gardner, Patricia Conrad, and Bill Sischo, School of Veterinary Medicine.

UC Davis News Service


Back to top ^

The Cost of Obesity in the Workplace: Judith Stern Counters
State health officials released a study concluding that California adults who are physically inactive and obese will cost the state $28 billion this year alone. The Department of Health Services’ study addressed who incurs the cost of obese adults, and who may be motivated to address the health problem.

Judith Stern, professor in the Department of Nutrition and vice president of the American Obesity Association, said that the government should do more. She suggests extending the school day for physical activity and nutrition counseling and requiring a health impact statement on new buildings, focusing on whether the design encourages employees to be sedentary.

Sacramento Bee

Judith S. Stern
Professor
Department of Nutrition
[email protected]
(530) 752-6575

Back to top ^

Vernal Pools Provide Wildlife Habitat: Robbin Thorp Comments
Robbin Thorp, professor emeritus in the Department of Entomology, cited the unique colonies of insects and plants that are dependent on vernal pools. "Some [bees] are so specialized that they visit only one particular type of flower," said Thorp. This close relationship between vernal pool plants and their pollinators means that if either the bee habitat or the vernal pool is lost, both species perish, according to Thorp. A report by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service estimates that 80 to 90 percent of historic wetlands have been lost in California and that "the loss continues unabated.” The article profiles one couple’s commitment to maintain a vernal pool on their 217-acre ranch.

Ventura County Star



Back to top ^

Birds With West Nile Virus
San Mateo County health officials announced the first evidence of West Nile virus activity in the county – a pine siskin tested positive for the mosquito-borne pathogen. The yellow-and-black striped songbird was collected in March in Hillsborough and tested at the UC Davis Center for Vectorborne Diseases.

Positive tests this early in the season may mean significant activity during the summer, when mosquitoes are more active. So far this year, birds have tested positive for the virus in 21 California counties, including Yolo County. Last year the virus killed 28 people in California, mostly in Southern California.

The public is asked to report findings of dead birds to the state Department of Health Services online at www.westnile.ca.gov or by calling (877) 968-2473.

San Jose Mercury News


Back to top ^

Publication: “If My Child is Overweight…”
In a New York Times article providing advice to parents on child nutrition, a UC publication was cited as an excellent guide for parents who have an overweight child. Publication topics include how to prevent a child from overeating, choosing healthy meals and snacks, increasing physical activity, and dealing with self-esteem and stigmatization issues. The publication, "If My Child is Overweight, What Should I Do About It?," is available from the UC Agriculture and Natural Resources catalog: http://anrcatalog.ucdavis.edu.

New York Times


Back to top ^

CA&ES Executive Committee Online
The monthly agendas, minutes, and upcoming meeting dates of the CA&ES Executive Committee are posted on the college Web site: http://caes.ucdavis.edu/FacStaff/ExcCom.htm. The next meeting is May 5, 1:30–3:30 p.m., 2154 Meyer Hall.


Back to top ^

Wine & the Mind: International Symposium
The "Wine & the Mind" international symposium invites scientists and the public to discuss how humans recognize, perceive, and respond to tastes, odors, and chemical irritants, specifically those of food, wine, and spirits. Leading international scientists will present their findings in comprehensible language, supplemented with a guided wine tasting. The symposium is organized by COPIA: The American Center for Wine, Food, and the Arts and the UC Davis Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science. It will be held at COPIA in Napa on May 14–15, 2005. For registration and a schedule of speakers, see: http://www.copia.org/pages/wineandthemind.asp


Back to top ^

Annual CA&ES Spring Meeting, June 9, 2005
The College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences will hold its annual spring meeting on June 9, 2005, 4–6 p.m. in the AGR Room, Buehler Alumni and Visitors Center. All faculty are encouraged to attend.



Back to top ^

Arboretum Events
April 23, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., Spring Plant Sale
Arboretum Nursery at Orchard Park

May 7, 11 a.m., Guided Tour: Spring in the White Flower Garden
Meet at the Gazebo

May 11, 12 noon, Walk with Warren
Meet at the Gazebo

May 14, 11 a.m., Guided Tour: Meet Our California Native Plants
Meet at the Buehler Alumni and Visitors Center

For information on arboretum events, see:
http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.htm


Back to top ^

 


Visit CA&ES Currents online at http://caes.ucdavis.edu/NewsEvents/currents.

CA&ES Currents, the faculty/staff newsletter of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at UC Davis, is published on the first and third Thursday of each month (in July and August, only on the first Thursday.)

News deadline is noon Monday preceding Thursday publication. Send news items to editor, [email protected].

Issue Editor:
Ann Filmer
(530) 754-6788
[email protected]

Contributors: Ann Filmer, Thomas Kaiser, Rhoda McKnight, Neal Van Alfen, John Weston.

Some Web links cited in this newsletter may be inaccessible to off-campus sites. If you want to view the full stories on the Web from off campus, you will need to provide a username and password the first time you try to view a story: username: clips password: newz

To be added to or deleted from this electronic newsletter list, please write to [email protected].

The University of California does not discriminate in any of its policies, procedures or practices. The university is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer.

 

.

 

CA&ES Currents, the faculty/staff newsletter of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at UC Davis, is published on the first and third Thursday of each month (in July and August, only on the first Thursday.)

 

News deadline is noon Monday preceding Thursday publication. Send news items to editor, [email protected]

.

 

Issue Editor:

 

Ann Filmer

(530) 754-6788

[email protected]

 

 

Contributors: Ann Filmer, Thomas Kaiser, Rhoda McKnight, Neal Van Alfen, John Weston.

 

Some Web links cited in this newsletter may be inaccessible to off-campus sites. If you want to view the full stories on the Web from off campus, you will need to provide a username and password the first time you try to view a story: username: clips password: newz

 

To be added to or deleted from this electronic newsletter list, please write to [email protected]

.

 

The University of California does not discriminate in any of its policies, procedures or practices. The university is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer.

 

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