CA&ES Currents Newsletter  icon newspaper

January 28, 2005

May 29, 2014 admin


MESSAGE FROM THE DEAN
A Message From Dean Van Alfen: Dean’s Council and Policy Council

WHO
Spotlight: Alison Van Eenennaam and Genetic Engineering Video

IN THE NEWS
Invader Threatens Coastal Waters: Ted Grosholz Investigates
Seamounts Teaming with Life: Peter Klimley Researches
Mites Destroying Almond Bee Colonies: Eric Mussen Quoted
Valley Oak Trees from Acorns: James Thorne Heads Project
Cow Study Yields Surprising Results: Frank Mitloehner on Dairy Air
UC Davis Design Museum in the Top 10

WHAT
ICE Report: Valley Must Focus on Jobs, Affordable Housing
Friends of the Fair Offering Scholarships
CA&ES Executive Committee Online
RFP: Joseph M. Ogawa Research and Teaching Endowment

WHAT
K-12 Math and Science Initiative Forum, Jan. 31, 2005
Postharvest Technology Workshops, 2005
Western Nutrient Management Conference, March 3 - 4, 2005
Design Museum Event: Baskets of Asia, Jan. 30 - Mar. 4, 2005
Arboretum Events

A Message From Dean Van Alfen: Dean’s Council and Policy Council
In the last issue of CA&ES Currents I stressed the importance of internal and external communication in our college. Two collegewide councils that I coordinate through my office are the Dean’s Council and the Policy Council. Both of these groups facilitate consultation and internal communication in the process of making decisions for the college.

The Dean’s Council, which meets monthly, addresses strategic planning in the college. The council recently developed a list of issues to be addressed over the next several months; examples include the strategy for FTE allocations, internal and external communication, and teaching workload.

A recent change to the Dean’s Council is the addition of a representative department chair from each of the three college divisions. These members were added to enhance two-way communication within the college. The division representatives and other faculty representatives will broadly share information from the Dean’s Council meetings and will transmit information and views from faculty and staff of the departments to the Dean’s Council.

The Dean’s Council
Dean: Neal Van Alfen
Executive Associate Dean: Jim MacDonald
Divisional Associate Deans: Tu Jarvis, Michael Parrella, Randal Southard
Associate Dean for Undergraduate Academic Programs: Annie King
Division representatives:
  Agricultural Sciences: Chris van Kessel
  Environmental Sciences: Andy Sih
  Human Sciences: Susan Kaiser
College Executive Committee, chair: Mike Delwiche
College Executive Committee, vice chair: Rand Conger
Specialist Advisory Committee, chair: Art Craigmill
International Programs, director: Patrick Brown
Executive Assistant Dean: Tom Kaiser
Executive Director, Research and Outreach: DeeDee Kitterman

 

The Policy Council is an operational group that makes decisions related to running the college. The Policy Council consists of myself, the five associate deans listed above, Tom Kaiser (executive assistant dean), DeeDee Kitterman (executive director, research and outreach), Julie Beal (college academic personnel officer), and Anne Muenster (college staff personnel officer).

The operational philosophy of both councils is that the decision-making process should be transparent and consultative, based on principle, and that information used in making decisions should be made widely available to faculty and staff. While it is impossible to hold town meetings to decide all issues, it is my hope that you will become engaged in the decision-making process through your representatives on these councils.

As always, I value your feedback. If you have questions or comments, please e-mail me.

Neal K. Van Alfen
Dean
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
[email protected]

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Spotlight: Alison Van Eenennaam and Genetic Engineering Video
“Genetic Engineering in California Agriculture,” an award-winning video written by Alison Van Eenennaam, a Cooperative Extension specialist in the Department of Animal Science, will be aired several times next week on UCTV (Dish network station 9412) and on some local cable stations.

Van Eenennaam prepared the video to help with education on genetic engineering in California agriculture. With many counties adopting local initiatives to prohibit genetically engineered crops and animals, this video is particularly timely.

The video explains the science behind genetic engineering, outlines its uses in food crops and animals, details where and why this technology is being used by California farmers, and examines the science-based concerns pertaining to the use of genetic engineering in agricultural production systems. This is an objective educational piece on a controversial topic, presented in a format that is intelligible and accessible to the general public.

Gary Anderson, chair of the animal science department, said, “Alison’s videotape is an excellent example of how AES and CE faculty can successfully disseminate objective, science-based information on a complex and even controversial topic and do so in a format that’s understandable to a general audience.”

Van Eenennaam joined the animal science department in 2002 as a specialist in animal genomics and biotechnology. Her outreach program provides information on a wide range of DNA-based biotechnologies as they relate to livestock production systems. More information on her programs can be obtained at http://animalscience.ucdavis.edu/animalbiotech/.

Viewings for the 30-minute video on UCTV are Jan. 31 (3:30 p.m.), Feb. 1 (7:30 and 10:30 p.m.), Feb. 2 (5:30 a.m.), Feb. 3 (11:30 a.m.), Feb. 4 (2:30 a.m.), Feb. 5 (8:30 a.m. and 11:30 p.m.), and Feb. 6 (3:30 p.m.).

Videotape and DVD copies of the program are available from ANR Communication Services (http://groups.ucanr.org/anronuctv/Video_Program_Sales_Information/). Alternatively, it can be viewed at any time as a streaming video link at (mms://STREAM.ucanr.org/Windows Media/UCTV_04_06.asf).

[email protected]
(530) 752-7942


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Invader Threatens Coastal Waters: Ted Grosholz Investigates
Ted Grosholz, specialist in the Department of Environmental Science and Policy, notes that European green crabs have hastened the invasion of eastern clams, quickly changing "a benign, introduced species into an aggressive invader." Articles in the Daily Democrat and Sacramento Bee highlight his studies which show indirect effects of invasive species in altering ecosystems.

Daily Democrat
UC Davis – Grosholz photo and story
Sacramento Bee


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Seamounts Teaming with Life: Peter Klimley Researches
Peter Klimley, professor, Department of Wildlife, Fish and Conservation Biology, is quoted in this article about seamounts in the ocean, which were once active volcanoes, but now appear to be centers of underground communities of sea life. Seamounts appear to serve as food stations, landmarks, and stepping-stones for an array of marine species. "The spectacular life around seamounts is beyond anything we could have imagined. I hope we don't destroy these astonishing and fragile habitats, before we even know what they're all about," said Klimley. Klimley is studying the tendency of hammerhead sharks and other animals to school in large groups around seamou

Washington Post


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Mites Destroying Almond Bee Colonies: Eric Mussen Quoted
Two recent articles quote Eric Mussen, a specialist in the Department of Entomology, about a possible remedy – a natural fungus – to combat the pin-head-sized Varroa mite that is systematically destroying bee colonies. Varroa mites have become problematic to beekeepers nationwide. The second article highlights the impact of the mite on the almond industry.

San Jose Mercury News
Porterville Recorder


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Valley Oak Trees from Acorns: James Thorne Heads Project
The UC Davis branch of the Society for Conservation Biology hopes to plant more than 500 valley oak trees in the Davis area this year. James Thorne, postgraduate researcher in the Department of Environmental Science and Policy, runs the project. By involving elementary school children in the project, Thorne hopes to inspire a culture of stewardship and ecological awareness. “Children learn that if you need some trees, you don't have to go buy them; you can just gather some seeds and grow your own,” says Thorne.

Davis Enterprise


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Cow Study Yields Surprising Results: Frank Mitloehner on Dairy Air
California dairy cows produce only half the amount of air pollution as previously believed and most of a dairy cow's contribution to smog comes not from manure, but from belching, according to Frank Mitloehner, a specialist in the Department of Animal Science. "For the first time we can tell dairy farmers the source of their air pollution," said Mitloehner. "We have to re-think that the only good solutions are engineering solutions, such as capping or aerating manure lagoons, and consider biological avenues such as animal feeding and management."

UC Davis


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UC Davis Design Museum in the Top 10
How magazine, considered the graphic designer's up-to-the-minute resource for ideas, techniques, and business advice, lists the UC Davis Design Museum as No. 8 on the list of 20 international museums for having great design.

The Design Museum is currently featuring a show on Baskets of Asia and will host a reception and curator lecture by Victoria Rivers on Jan. 30. For more information see the Design Museum Web site http://designmuseum.ucdavis.edu/exhibit_schedule.html.

How Magazine


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ICE Report: Valley Must Focus on Jobs, Affordable Housing
A study funded by the Information Center for the Environment and the California State University System in conjunction with other private and governmental units reports that Central Valley cities are faring no better today economically than they were five years ago. The report cites skyrocketing housing costs and low wages as the main factors.

The Information Center for the Environment is an environmental information brokerage and research laboratory in the Department of Environmental Science and Policy under the direction of Professor James Quinn and academic administrator Michael McCoy.

The report is available online at http://www.greatvalley.org.

Lodi News-Sentinel http://www.news.ucdavis.edu/in_the_news/full_text/view_clip.lasso?id=10262


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Friends of the Fair Offering Scholarships
High school seniors or college students planning a career in agricultural-related fields may be eligible for Friends of the Fair scholarships totaling $14,000.

Application deadline: March 1, 2005

Scholarship Information and Application Forms: http://www.friendsofthefair.org/

Information:

JoAn Giannoni
(707) 678-5618


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CA&ES Executive Committee Online
The monthly agendas, minutes, and upcoming meeting dates of the CA&ES Executive Committee are posted on the college Web site: http://caes.ucdavis.edu/FacStaff/ExcCom.htm.

The next meeting will be on Feb. 7, 3 - 5 p.m., 2154 Meyer Hall.


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K-12 Math and Science Initiative Forum, Jan. 31, 2005
Lynda Goff, representing UC Santa Cruz Provost MRC Greenwood, visits UC Davis on Jan. 31 to discuss UC's role in the Governor's K-12 Math and Science Initiative. Chancellor Vanderhoef and Provost Hinshaw will participate in a public forum discussion from 9:00 - 10:00 a.m. in room 203, Mrak Hall. Deans, associate deans, department chairs, faculty, and program directors and/or coordinators are invited to attend.

Breakout groups throughout the day are scheduled as follows:

9 – 10 a.m. Public forum (203 Mrak)
10 – 11 a.m. Deans and associate deans (203 Mrak)
11 – noon School of Education faculty (203 Mrak)
1 – 2 p.m. Math and science department chairs and faculty (DiCarli Rm at the MU)
2 – 3 p.m. Program coordinators / program directors (DiCarli Rm at the MU)

Arlene Jones
Office of Vice Provost
[email protected]
(530) 752-6068
http://undergraduatestudies.ucdavis.edu/


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Postharvest Technology Workshops, 2005
The Postharvest Technology Research & Information Center announces its schedule of upcoming short courses and workshops:

Better Process Control School, Feb. 22 - 25, 2005

Management of Fruit Ripening Workshop, April 26, 2005

Postharvest Technology Short Course, June 20 - July 1, 2005

Fresh-cut Products: Maintaining Quality and Safety, Sept. 13 - 15, 2005

For workshop details and registration, visit the Web site (see right column): http://postharvest.ucdavis.edu/

Mary Reed
Postharvest Technology RIC
[email protected]
(530) 752-6941


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Western Nutrient Management Conference, March 3 - 4, 2005
The Western Nutrient Management Conference will be held March 3 - 4, 2005 in Salt Lake City, Utah. The coordinating committee, comprised of representatives from land-grant universities, public agencies, and private industry, sponsors the event.

Priority registration ends Feb. 11, 2005.

Conference details:
http://cropandsoil.oregonstate.edu/nm/WCC103/wcc103.htm

Phyllis Pates
Program Coordinator
[email protected]


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Design Museum Event: Baskets of Asia, Jan. 30 - Mar. 4, 2005
Reception and Curator Lecture, Jan. 30, 2005:

- Curatorial Lecture: 1 - 2 p.m., 176 Everson Hall
$10, free to Design Alliance members and students

- Opening Reception: 2 - 4 p.m., 145 Walker Hall, Free to all

Design Museum Web site http://designmuseum.ucdavis.edu

John Fulton
(530) 752-6150
[email protected]


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Arboretum Events
All events are free and open to the public unless specified.

Feb. 6, 12:00 noon, A Brisk Walk in the Arboretum
Meet at the Alumni and Visitors Center

Feb. 9, 12:00 noon, Walk with Warren
Meet at Mrak Hall (south entrance)

Feb. 13, 2:00 p.m., Color in Your Garden
Meet at the Gazebo

For more information on arboretum events:
(530) 752-4880
http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.htm


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RFP: Joseph M. Ogawa Research and Teaching Endowment
The College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences is pleased to announce that the Joseph M. Ogawa Research and Teaching Endowment Committee is accepting proposals from undergraduate and graduate students, and postdoctoral researchers for research projects addressing production problems of temperate zone tree fruit and nut crops.

Deadline: February 15, 2005

Information:
http://www.plpnem.ucdavis.edu/plp/news/current_news.html

Donna J. Gutierrez
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
[email protected]
(530) 754-8961

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Visit CA&ES Currents online at http://caes.ucdavis.edu/NewsEvents/currents.

CA&ES Currents, the faculty/staff newsletter of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at UC Davis, is published on the first and third Thursday of each month (in July and August, only on the first Thursday.)

News deadline is noon Monday preceding Thursday publication. Send news items to editor, [email protected].

Issue Editor:
Ann Filmer
(530) 754-6788
[email protected]

Contributors: Ann Filmer, Thomas Kaiser, Rhoda McKnight, Neal Van Alfen, John Weston.

Some Web links cited in this newsletter may be inaccessible to off-campus sites. If you want to view the full stories on the Web from off campus, you will need to provide a username and password the first time you try to view a story: username: clips password: newz

To be added to or deleted from this electronic newsletter list, please write to [email protected].

The University of California does not discriminate in any of its policies, procedures or practices. The university is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer.

 

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