CA&ES Currents Newsletter  icon newspaper

March 11, 2005

May 29, 2014 admin


MESSAGE FROM THE DEAN
A Message from Dean Van Alfen: Changes in the Department of Environmental Design

IN THE NEWS
Spotlight: Elderberry Mitigation Project is Economic Engine for Sacramento Cooperative Extension
Action Needed to Save Diversity in Crops: Cal Qualset Reports
Terroir: The Taste of the Earth; Linda Bisson Explains
Ozone-Friendly Strawberries: Steve Fennimore Quoted

WHAT
CA&ES Executive Committee Election 2005–06
CA&ES Executive Committee Online

WHAT
Beyond Consuming: Food, Wine, and Culture of the Pacific, March 17–19, 2005
California Energy Commission Workshop on Environmental Funding, April 7, 2005
RMI Lectureship Series Continues, April 21, 2005
Arboretum Events

A Message from Dean Van Alfen: Changes in the Department of Environmental Design
The Design Program, which has been a part of the Department of Environmental Design, has transferred from our college to the Division of Humanities, Arts, and Cultural Studies in the College of Letters and Sciences. The transfer of this program is one of the decisions that was made to help our college address its budget crisis of recent years. The Design Program has been an important contributing partner to the other departments and programs in our college, but it was in great need of significant new investments that we could ill afford, so the decision was made to help the program prosper by moving it into a growing cluster of visual arts programs in HArCS. We will miss our colleagues, but celebrate with them an invigoration through new investments that are being made in their program because of this transfer. The Landscape Architecture (LDA) Program remains in the Department of Environmental Design in our college and is actively planning to strengthen its undergraduate landscape architecture major and to build into new and exciting areas of research, graduate education, and outreach in partnership with other departments. Two new centers are being planned in which the LDA faculty will play important roles: the Center for the Study of Regional Change and the Center for Urban Horticulture. A bright future awaits both programs of our Department of Environmental Design.

Neal K. Van Alfen
Dean
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
[email protected]

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Spotlight: Elderberry Mitigation Project is Economic Engine for Sacramento Cooperative Extension
Chuck Ingels, Cooperative Extension farm advisor in Sacramento County, and Marcel Holyoak, professor in the Department of Environmental Science and Policy, have teamed up to establish a seven-acre elderberry mitigation site along the American River parkway in Sacramento. The project is part of a conservation effort to help save a threatened insect species. Elderberry plants and other native species are being disturbed by construction of a five-foot wide buried sewage pipeline near California State University, Sacramento. The Sacramento County Regional Sanitation District, who is overseeing construction, is collaborating with the university on the long-term project. Hundreds of new plants must be planted at another site to mitigate the disturbance, according to U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service guidelines. This will improve the habitat for the valley elderberry longhorn beetle (VELB), a threatened species that feeds only on elderberries. Over 90 percent of the original VELB habitat has been lost to development and agriculture. Studying the plants and their use by the threatened beetle will contribute to conservation efforts by adding to our knowledge about the beetle’s populations and how to create habitats for it. The project generates $150,000 for the Cooperative Extension budget in Sacramento County and $120,000 for the monitoring of the site. Master gardeners, part of Cooperative Extension, receive volunteer hours and hands-on experience with the elderberry project. The project also attracts volunteers from AmeriCorps and local high schools who plant new trees. About 1,500 plants, including nearly 700 elderberries, are being planted at the site, east of Discovery Park. Landscape fabric and wood chips are laid down around each plant to control weeds and a fence is used around each plant to prevent deer browsing. For the next 10 years, Ingels’ research group will maintain the plants and Holyoak and his graduate students will monitor the population and distribution of the beetle. Chuck Ingels
[email protected]
(916) 875-6913

Marcel Holyoak
[email protected]
(530) 754-7046


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Action Needed to Save Diversity in Crops: Cal Qualset Reports
Cal Qualset, interim director of UC Davis’ new Agricultural Sustainability Institute and professor emeritus in the former Department of Agronomy and Range Science, co-authored a report from the Genetic Resources Conservation Program. The report warns that unless there is a more intensive effort to preserve the diversity of plant genes, researchers may not be able to develop crops that can fight future pests. In a congressional briefing, Qualset stressed that global financial support is needed to maintain international gene banks. UC Davis has more than 100 important seed collections that help maintain plant gene diversity.

Sacramento Bee

Calvin Qualset
Director
GRCP
(530) 754-8501

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Terroir: The Taste of the Earth; Linda Bisson Explains
Most Americans never learned to recognize wines by their vineyard. “California wines have mostly been defined by the type of grape and the winemaker's style, not the vineyard or the year. That suits the typical wine drinker seeking consistent enjoyment rather than an intellectual challenge,” says Linda Bisson, professor in the Department of Viticulture and Enology. Some customers are now asking about specific vineyards, and paying premium prices for wines from select vineyards. This trend is growing among wine connoisseurs.

Newsweek



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Ozone-Friendly Strawberries: Steve Fennimore Quoted
An editorial in the Sacramento Bee addresses the dilemma faced by U.S. strawberry farmers who are being forced to phase out the use of the biocide methyl bromide. The college is engaged in extensive research to develop alternatives to methyl bromide for many different crops. The challenge has not been easy. "Basically, we need to breed strawberries that are resistant to soil pests," said Steve Fennimore, specialist in the Department of Plant Sciences (formerly in the Department of Vegetable Crops). With the current technology, loss of methyl bromide will mean higher production costs for farmers and higher prices for consumers.

Sacramento Bee



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CA&ES Executive Committee Election 2005–06
Both Academic Senate and Academic Federation representation is needed for the Division of Agricultural Sciences. Elected members serve a three-year term. Nomination deadline: March 29, 2005.

For copies of the election notice and nomination forms, contact:

Sharon A. Berg
Administrative Specialist
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
[email protected]
(530) 752-3483

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CA&ES Executive Committee Online
The monthly agendas, minutes, and upcoming meeting dates of the CA&ES Executive Committee are posted on the college Web site: http://caes.ucdavis.edu/FacStaff/ExcCom.htm.

The next meeting will be on March 21, 3–5 p.m., 2154 Meyer Hall.


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Beyond Consuming: Food, Wine, and Culture of the Pacific, March 17–19, 2005
The campus and general public are invited to attend a conference on the culture of food in the Pacific. The three-day program will include panel discussions, keynote talks, and tours of UC Davis food laboratories and the Davis Farmers Market. Topics range from gastronomic heritages to biotechnology to the challenges of cooking with local produce. The conference will open with a food and film seminar at 3 p.m., March 17, in MU II at the Memorial Union, followed by a welcome from UC Davis Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor Virginia Hinshaw at 5 p.m. The free event is sponsored by the Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science and the Pacific Regional Humanities Center. No registration is needed. Information and schedule: http://prhc.ucdavis.edu/initiatives/BCsched.htm


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California Energy Commission Workshop on Environmental Funding, April 7, 2005
The California Energy Commission’s PIER Environmental Area Team is accepting applications for research projects through its Environmental Exploratory Grant Program. The goal of the program is to support the early development of promising, new scientific concepts with the potential to impact the way we understand and/or address energy-related environmental issues. A presentation on the solicitation will be made in the DeCarli Room, Memorial Union, from 10 a.m.–12 noon on Thursday, April 7, 2005.

For more information contact:

Liz Grassi
[email protected]
(530) 754-5776


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RMI Lectureship Series Continues, April 21, 2005
The Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science (RMI) will host the second lectureship in the RMI Lectureship Series on Thursday, April 21, 2005 at the Robert and Margrit Performing Arts Center, Studio Theatre. The half-day event, which includes a luncheon in the Jackson Hall lobby, will feature these speakers:

  • Joe Collins, partner, Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Partnership; “Progress of the RMI Building Project”
  • Mary Wagner, chief technical officer, E.&J. Gallo Winery; “A Food Scientist Takes a Sip of Wine”
  • Ted Ziemann, president, Cargill Health & Food Technologies; “Health through Foods…An Economic Solution”

Also at the event will be Clare Hasler, executive director of RMI, Neal Van Alfen, dean of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, and UC Davis Chancellor Larry Vanderhoef.

 

For Information and registration, contact:

 

Jean S. Wigglesworth

[email protected]

 

(530) 754-6349

 

 

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Arboretum Events

 

The tours are free and open to the public.

 

March 20, 2:00 p.m., Arboretum Tour: Living under the Redwoods

 

Meet at the Buehler Alumni & Visitors Center

 

March 26, 11:00 a.m., Arboretum Tour: Container Gardening
Meet at the Arboretum Terrace Garden

April 2, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., Spring Plant Sale
Arboretum Nursery at Orchard Park

For more information on arboretum events:

(530) 752-4880
http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.htm


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Visit CA&ES Currents online at http://caes.ucdavis.edu/NewsEvents/currents.

CA&ES Currents, the faculty/staff newsletter of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at UC Davis, is published on the first and third Thursday of each month (in July and August, only on the first Thursday.)

News deadline is noon Monday preceding Thursday publication. Send news items to editor, [email protected].

Issue Editor:
Ann Filmer
(530) 754-6788
[email protected]

Contributors: Ann Filmer, Thomas Kaiser, Rhoda McKnight, Neal Van Alfen, John Weston.

Some Web links cited in this newsletter may be inaccessible to off-campus sites. If you want to view the full stories on the Web from off campus, you will need to provide a username and password the first time you try to view a story: username: clips password: newz

To be added to or deleted from this electronic newsletter list, please write to [email protected].

The University of California does not discriminate in any of its policies, procedures or practices. The university is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer.

 

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