CA&ES Currents Newsletter  icon newspaper

May 19, 2005

May 29, 2014 admin


MESSAGE FROM THE DEAN
A Message from Dean Van Alfen: Rebuilding Our College

WHO
Kathryn Dewey: Kellogg Prize for International Nutrition
Andre Lauchli: Honorary Doctorate Degree
Mark Francis: Great Park Design Jury Panel

IN THE NEWS
In the Spotlight: Museum of Wildlife and Fish Biology
Federal Nutrition Program: Lucia Kaiser on Review Panel
Agritourism and Farmer Survival: Desmond Jolly Tracks Data
What’s So Special About Cache Creek?: Peter Moyle Cited

WHAT
2005–06 Freshman Seminar Program: Call for Proposals
CA&ES Executive Committee Online

WHAT
New Faculty: Technology in Teaching, May 26, 2005
Arboretum Events

A Message from Dean Van Alfen: Rebuilding Our College
The past few years have been difficult for our college given the budget cuts that we experienced. Yet, looking at what we have accomplished during that time, an observer would see a dynamic college rather than one that is fighting for survival. We have been engaged in a planning process for rebuilding and redefining our college that will serve to guide our future. Even with our recent budget challenges, we remain one of the most dynamic groups on this campus. Data that was recently shared by the provost’s office demonstrate our quality:

  1. Over the past two years our college’s direct expenditures from contract and grant funding increased from about $57 million to $73 million, an increase of 28 percent.
  2. Even more remarkable, during this same period our college’s contribution to the overall research endeavor from the undergraduate colleges increased from 51.8 percent of the total to 53.3 percent.
  3. We have a significant role in graduate student education. Thirty percent of the graduate students who are associated with undergraduate colleges are housed in our departments.
  4. Even though our admissions were capped, we increased our instruction by 4 percent.

We have been doing much more than surviving. We have a remarkable group of faculty, staff, and students that does much to define the culture and quality of the entire campus. Because of the leadership role we play in the scholarship of this campus, members of our college need to continue to participate in guiding the future direction of the campus through the various avenues open to all of us. As always, I value your feedback. If you have questions or comments, please e-mail me.

 

Neal K. Van Alfen

Dean

College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences

[email protected]

 

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Kathryn Dewey: Kellogg Prize for International Nutrition

 

Kathryn Dewey, professor in the Department of Nutrition, and associate director of the Program in International Nutrition, received the Kellogg Prize for International Nutrition at the annual meeting of the American Society for Nutritional Sciences.

The Society for International Nutrition Research/Kellogg Prize for International Nutrition recognizes excellence in international nutrition research that benefits populations in less-industrialized countries.

Lindsay Allen, a colleague of Dewey and a professor in the Department of Nutrition, said of Dewey, “There are few scientists in the field of international nutrition who are more deserving of our respect, or who are more dedicated to conducting difficult research in the areas of breastfeeding, lactation, and infant growth and development. Moreover, there are few scientists whose research has had such an impact on international nutrition policy.”

Kellogg Prize for International Nutrition



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Andre Lauchli: Honorary Doctorate Degree
Andre Lauchli, professor in the Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, is receiving an honorary doctorate degree from the University of Giessen, a leading German university in the area of plant nutrition. Lauchli will receive the award in June for his research in plant nutrition and for his support of young researchers from the University of Giessen. Lauchli has close ties with two faculty in the Department of Plant Nutrition in Giessen who conducted postdoctoral research in Lauchli’s laboratory at UC Davis. Lauchli’s main research area addresses the responses and adaptations of crops to salinity and toxic trace elements in the soil environment.

Andre Lauchli
Associate Vice Chancellor for Research
Department of Land, Air and Water Resources
[email protected]
(530) 754-5730

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Mark Francis: Great Park Design Jury Panel
Mark Francis, professor in the Landscape Architecture Program, is one of six professionals named by the Orange County Great Park Corporation to serve on the Orange County Great Park design jury panel. The jury will recommend the six landscape architecture finalists who will compete to develop a Great Park conceptual design master plan. Larry Agran, chair of the Orange County Great Park Corporation, said, "I am extremely pleased that such a distinguished group of experts will assist in creating the first great metropolitan park of the 21st century." Francis is internationally recognized for his landscape ecology and sustainable environment work. He is an environmental advocate who has published on landscape design, planning, and ecology. Mark Francis
(530) 752-6031
[email protected]

The Great Park Project


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In the Spotlight: Museum of Wildlife and Fish Biology
Within the first-floor halls of Academic Surge is an amazing collection of 8,000 mammals, 10,000 fish, and 12,000 birds, all preserved and used in many teaching and research programs. The National Science Foundation (NSF) recently awarded the Museum of Wildlife and Fish Biology (MWFB) a three-year facilities improvement grant of $290,000 to categorize and develop databases for the 30,000 specimens in the museum collection. According to Andrew Engilis, curator of the museum, “Our collection is receiving major national recognition for its scope and for our unique collection techniques. It is the third largest university vertebrate collection in California, and is among the fastest growing collections in the state.” Engilis notes that few university collections receive this type of NSF funding, which underscores the importance of the collection. The MWFB is one of only two institutions in the U.S. that has substantial numbers of freeze-dried specimens. Since these are whole animal specimens, they offer more research opportunities than do other, more traditionally preserved specimens. The museum is notable for incorporating the former UC Davis zoology department’s collection and several orphan collections from other California universities, including UC Irvine, Mills College, and American River College. Protection of these historic collections is important because it allows for studying biodiversity in given geographic areas over time. The Museum of Wildlife and Fish Biology focuses primarily on California species, but also has important collections from the Western U.S., Central America, and the Pacific Islands. The museum is linked to the Department of Wildlife, Fish and Conservation Biology. It started in 1973 as a teaching collection, and has evolved to a world-class teaching and research collection. The NSF Biological Research Collections Program grant, which began in February 2005, is administered by Engilis and Douglas Kelt, professor in the wildlife, fish and conservation biology department. Ron Cole, museum curator emeritus, Irene Torres, collections manager, and several student interns are working with them on the project. Andrew Engilis
(530) 752-0364
[email protected]


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Federal Nutrition Program: Lucia Kaiser on Review Panel
Researchers at the Institute of Medicine released a report calling for major changes to the $5.2 billion federal nutrition program for women, infants, and children (WIC). Lucia Kaiser, specialist in Cooperative Extension, Department of Nutrition, served on the review committee. "It's time to take a look at things because the population that WIC services has become much more diverse," Kaiser said. She noted that offering a wider range of options, such as more fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, will make the package healthier and will increase the program's flexibility and allow WIC to evolve with the changing population.

Fairfield Daily Republic

Lucia Kaiser
Community Nutrition Specialist
Department of Nutrition
[email protected]
(530) 754-9063

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Agritourism and Farmer Survival: Desmond Jolly Tracks Data
Agritourism generates an estimated $75 million statewide annually, according to Desmond Jolly, director of the UC Small Farm Center. A Los Angeles Times article on the convergence between agriculture and entertainment addresses the struggle of farmers to survive, and how more than 600 California farms are providing diverse direct-marketing, agritourism opportunities, including dude ranches, pony rides, and petting zoos. "It's no longer a novelty," said Jolly. "We're now looking at the farm as something that has assets beyond just what it grows." The Small Farm Center keeps a database of agritourism operations and provides guidance to farmers on agritourism opportunities.

The Los Angeles Times

Desmond A. Jolly
Small Farm Center
[email protected]
(530) 752-8136

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What’s So Special About Cache Creek?: Peter Moyle Cited
The Cache Creek basin is home to a significant association of native fish species. According to studies by Peter Moyle, professor in the Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Conservation Biology, this is probably because the creek system has not been dammed near the Sacramento River and the hydrology in the basin still resembles the hydrology present when California was settled by Europeans. Cache Creek drains from Clear Lake, which may be the oldest lake in North America. Cache Creek has been in the news because of proposed wild and scenic river legislation, potential flood issues, high mercury levels in some of its fish, and invasive plants growing along its banks.

Daily Democrat

Peter B. Moyle
Professor
Deptartment of Wildlife, Fish and Conservation Biology
[email protected]
(530) 752-6355

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2005–06 Freshman Seminar Program: Call for Proposals
Reminder: Deadline for proposal submission: May 27, 2005

Interested faculty should complete the "Proposal to Teach a Freshman Seminar" material found on the Teaching Resources Center Web site http://trc.ucdavis.edu/trc/freshSem/call.html.

For information:
Janet Chambers
(530) 752-3249
[email protected]


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CA&ES Executive Committee Online
The monthly agendas, minutes, and upcoming meeting dates of the CA&ES Executive Committee are posted on the college Web site: http://caes.ucdavis.edu/FacStaff/ExcCom.htm.

The next meeting is June 2, 1:30–3:30 p.m., in 2154 Meyer Hall.


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New Faculty: Technology in Teaching, May 26, 2005
The final “New Faculty Brown Bag” for the academic year, offered by the Office of the Provost, will be held May 26, 2005, from 12 noon–1:30 p.m. in Room 203, Mrak Hall. The topic, “Teaching and Learning: Effective Uses of Technology in the Learning Process,” will be taught by Richard Walters, Department of Computer Science, and Andy Jones, University Writing Program. Bring a bagged lunch. RSVP to:
Lenore Myers
(530) 754-5378
[email protected]


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Arboretum Events
May 22, 2:00 p.m., Guided Tour: Wildlife in Your Garden
Meet at the Buehler Alumni and Visitors Center May 28, 9:00 a.m., Guided Tour: Winging It in the Garden -- Share Your Garden with Birds
Meet at the Gazebo June 4, 11:00 a.m., Guided Tour: Living Antiques in the Storer Garden -- Roses for the Central Valley
Meet at the Gazebo For information on arboretum events:
(530) 752-4880
http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.htm


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Visit CA&ES Currents online at http://caes.ucdavis.edu/NewsEvents/currents.

CA&ES Currents, the faculty/staff newsletter of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at UC Davis, is published on the first and third Thursday of each month (in July and August, only on the first Thursday.)

News deadline is noon Monday preceding Thursday publication. Send news items to editor, [email protected].

Issue Editor:
Ann Filmer
(530) 754-6788
[email protected]

Contributors: Ann Filmer, Thomas Kaiser, Rhoda McKnight, Neal Van Alfen, John Weston.

Some Web links cited in this newsletter may be inaccessible to off-campus sites. If you want to view the full stories on the Web from off campus, you will need to provide a username and password the first time you try to view a story: username: clips password: newz

To be added to or deleted from this electronic newsletter list, please write to [email protected].

The University of California does not discriminate in any of its policies, procedures or practices. The university is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer.

 

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