CA&ES Currents Newsletter  icon newspaper

November 03, 2005

Jun 03, 2014 admin


MESSAGE FROM THE DEAN
A Message from Dean Neal Van Alfen: Engagement with Stakeholders

WHO
Mel George: America’s Heartland (November 12, 2005)
Terry Nathan: Modeling Climate Change in Solar Cycles

IN THE NEWS
Peter Havel: High Fructose Corn Syrup and Obesity
Philip Martin and Michael Smith: Immigration and Labor
Linda Harris: Food Illnesses and Restaurants
Jan Hopmans: Salinity Threatens Central Valley Farming

WHAT
National Wetlands Awards
Plant Breeding Academy
Arboretum Events: November

WHAT
MountainFilm in Davis, November 4, 2005
ASUCD-Community Blood Drive, November 7–9, 2005
Pistachio Production Short Course, November 8–10, 2005
A Conversation with Bruce Babbitt, November 11, 2005
Connecting with Alumni: Orchestrating a Win-Win, November 16, 2005
The Web: Balancing Content, Creativity, Compliance, November 30, 2005
National Science Foundation Workshop, November 30–December 1, 2005
Breeding with Molecular Markers, February 8–9, 2006

A Message from Dean Neal Van Alfen: Engagement with Stakeholders
The campus strategic plan provides stated goals in the areas of learning, discovery, and engagement. Engagement is a core activity of our college; it is something that we have always taken very seriously because engagement plays such an important role in the missions of the Agricultural Experiment Station (AES) and Cooperative Extension (CE). While we all agree that engagement is an important responsibility of the faculty in our college, it is less clear how we should meet this responsibility. One approach that we have taken is to engage the stakeholders of our college early in the planning of institutes, centers, and activities that are intended to serve their needs. Stakeholder groups were instrumental in our planning for the Agricultural Sustainability Institute and in the current planning for the Center for Urban Horticulture. Engaging stakeholders early in the planning process assures that our programs will be more effective. Some of our departments have a long history of success in such engagement with stakeholders, and we can all learn from them. In addition to our collective responsibility as a university to serve our stakeholders, the AES and CE faculty have specific responsibilities for outreach and they are held accountable for it in the merit evaluation process. During this coming year there will be programs to assist AES and CE faculty in understanding how they can better meet their outreach responsibilities. On January 26, 2006, there will be an AES faculty meeting focusing on how individual faculty members can meet their outreach responsibilities. The AES Faculty Advisory Committee has prepared educational materials regarding outreach that will be widely distributed. To increase the opportunities for our faculty to participate in engagement activities, we are inviting CE county advisors to join some of our departments. If this experimental model is successful, we envision that a closer connection with our county programs will provide many more opportunities for our faculty and our departments to meet our campus engagement goals. As always, I value your feedback. If you have questions or comments, please e-mail me.

Neal K. Van Alfen
Dean
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
[email protected]

Back to top ^

Mel George: America’s Heartland (November 12, 2005)
Mel George’s research on using GPS collars on cattle was featured in a recent episode of the national television series, America’s Heartland. A repeat broadcast of the episode will occur on Saturday, November 12, 2005, at 1:30 a.m. (set your VCR or stay up late!) on KVIE Channel 6. George’s “cows in space” work at the McDougald Ranch in Madera County focuses on tracking cattle movement and temperatures by satellite. Cattle movement can destroy streamside vegetation, resulting in erosion, habitat loss, and water quality degradation. By understanding cattle behavior, George, research associate David Cao, and their colleagues hope to find ways to possibly change the destructive actions of the cattle to ones that are more environmentally friendly. Mel George is a specialist in Cooperative Extension in the plant sciences department, working on range and pasture improvement, grazing and rangeland management, and rangeland water quality. America’s Heartland
http://www.americasheartland.org/ Melvin George
(530) 752-1720
[email protected]


Back to top ^

Terry Nathan: Modeling Climate Change in Solar Cycles
Terry Nathan, vice chair for atmospheric science in the Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, received a major NASA grant to study “Modeling the Climate System's Response to the 11-year Solar Cycle.” Nathan is team leader on this multi-institutional research project that addresses the effects of solar variability on climate change. Collaborating institutions are the National Center for Atmospheric Research, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C., and San Jose State University. Terrence Nathan
(530) 752-1609
[email protected]


Back to top ^

Peter Havel: High Fructose Corn Syrup and Obesity
Peter Havel, a researcher in the Department of Nutrition, found that several hormones involved in the regulation of body weight do not respond to fructose as they do to other types of sugars, such as glucose. "Fructose doesn't appear to signal the hormonal systems involved in the long-term regulation of food intake and energy metabolism," he said. The article notes, “Havel's research shows that fructose does not stimulate insulin and leptin -- two hormones that help turn down the appetite and control body weight. At the same time, fructose does not suppress our body's production of ghrelin, a hormone that increases hunger and appetite. . . . The debate picked up steam recently with the release of a new study in July that suggests fructose alters our metabolic rate in a way that favors fat storage. “Havel isn't convinced that high fructose corn syrup by itself is to blame for our widening waistlines because it would be ‘too simplistic’ to single it out. Inactivity and dietary fat are major contributors to the problem, he said.” Fort Wayne News Sentinel
http://www.news.ucdavis.edu/in_the_news/full_text/view_clip.lasso?id=12917 Peter Havel
(530) 752-6553
[email protected]


Back to top ^

Philip Martin and Michael Smith: Immigration and Labor
Phil Martin, professor in agricultural and resource economics, and Michael Smith, professor in human and community development, have both been in the news addressing issues related to immigration and labor.

An article in the Sacramento Bee covered Martin’s research on immigration patterns, noting that his prediction of a two-tier labor economy has come true. “High immigration and birth rates – especially among immigrant mothers – coupled with changes that moved California’s economy away from industrialism to services, communications, and trade, have produced immense social and cultural change.” The article concludes that “we have become a two-tier society defined by education and income levels, home ownership, health care, transportation access, and increasingly, ethnicity.”

An article in the Auburn Journal notes that “while clamping down on illegal immigration may garner strong public support, Dr. Michael Smith said that the larger issues need to be addressed in the context of immigration and the role it plays in the nation’s economy, particularly in border states like California.”

Smith said, “Labor demand isn’t going to disappear. A more productive way to go about it is addressing the issue of illegals, and come up with a program to regularize this labor flow.” The article is in response to Rep. John Doolittle introducing a bill in Congress that would make deportation proceedings mandatory for illegal aliens detained at national borders.

The Sacramento Bee
http://www.news.ucdavis.edu/in_the_news/full_text/view_clip.lasso?id=12482

The Auburn Journal
http://www.news.ucdavis.edu/in_the_news/full_text/view_clip.lasso?id=12991

Philip Martin
(530) 752-1530
[email protected]

Michael Smith
(530) 752-2243
[email protected]


Back to top ^

Linda Harris: Food Illnesses and Restaurants
While many people want to blame food-borne illnesses on the most recent place they ate, Linda Harris, a food safety specialist in the Department of Food Science and Technology, noted in the San Francisco Chronicle that you cannot make that assumption.

“Incubation periods for the bacteria and viruses that cause food-borne illnesses range from several hours to several weeks. For many types of food-borne illness, says Harris, the time elapsed between ingestion and symptoms will be 24 to 72 hours.” Many of the common food-borne bacterial offenders, such as salmonella, shigella, campylobacter, and E. coli “spread and multiply as a result of poor food-handling practices, such as failure to keep hot foods hot and cold foods cold, or inadequate hand washing by food preparers and servers.”

The San Francisco Chronicle
http://www.news.ucdavis.edu/in_the_news/full_text/view_clip.lasso?id=13040

Linda Harris
(530) 754-9485
[email protected]


Back to top ^

Jan Hopmans: Salinity Threatens Central Valley Farming
“The long-term viability of irrigated agriculture in California’s highly productive Central Valley is threatened by the accumulation of salt in soils and groundwater,” reports the Central Valley Business Times. This report is based on research conducted by Jan Hopmans and colleagues. Hopmans is a professor and soil hydrologist in the Department of Land, Air and Water Resources. “To evaluate the effects of salinization in the San Joaquin Valley, the researchers developed a computer model that . . . enabled them to reconstruct historical changes in soil and groundwater salinization . . . starting in 1940,” according to the article. “The researchers forecast that, although it may take decades, salt accumulation will continue in this region, decreasing the quality of deeper groundwater sources and jeopardizing water used both for irrigation and drinking.” The Central Valley Business Times
http://www.news.ucdavis.edu/in_the_news/full_text/view_clip.lasso?id=13077 Jan Hopmans
(530) 752-3060
[email protected]


Back to top ^

National Wetlands Awards
Each year the environmental community honors individuals who have dedicated their time and energy to protecting our nation's wetlands. The 2006 awards will be given in six categories: education and outreach; science research; conservation and restoration; landowner stewardship; state, tribal, and local program development; and wetland community leader. The National Wetlands Awards Program honors individuals from across the country who have demonstrated extraordinary effort, innovation, and excellence through programs or projects at the regional, state, or local level. Program sponsors are the Environmental Law Institute, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the USDA Forest Service, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, NOAA Fisheries, the Natural Resources Conservation Service, and the Federal Highway Administration. To nominate a colleague or someone worthy of the award, nomination forms are available at http://www2.eli.org/nwa/nwaprogram.htm. The deadline for submitting nominations is December 15, 2005. Organizations and federal employees are not eligible. For more information about the National Wetlands Awards Program, contact: Jared Thompson
(202) 939-3247
[email protected]


Back to top ^

Plant Breeding Academy
The Seed Biotechnology Center is organizing a professional development course to teach plant breeding principles to seed industry personnel so that they can become better plant breeders. The two-year course will occur at UC Davis for one week per quarter over two years (eight sessions), starting in fall 2006. Readings and exercises will continue between sessions via the Internet to allow participants to maintain their current positions while enrolled in the course. The course is targeted toward personnel in private breeding programs who lack the academic background in genetics theory and practice to advance as independent breeders. Current breeders who desire a refresher course or want to broaden their expertise are also potential participants. For additional information, see
http://sbc.ucdavis.edu/Events/Plant_Breeding_Academy.htm. Contact:
Sue Webster
Seed Biotechnology Center
(530) 754-7333
[email protected]


Back to top ^

Arboretum Events: November
The following guided tours are free and open to the public. For additional information, contact the UC Davis Arboretum at http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/. Sunday, November 6, 2:00 p.m., Arboretum Headquarters
“Brisk Walk in the Arboretum”
Docent Kate Mawdsley will give an overview of the arboretum's layout and highlight the plant collections. Free parking is available across the street from the headquarters building. Wednesday, November 9, 12:00 noon, Mrak Hall south entrance
“Walk with Warren”
Join arboretum superintendent Warren Roberts for a lunchtime stroll in the arboretum. Enjoy the crisp fall weather, learn about the arboretum’s collections, and get some exercise. Saturday, November 12, 11:00 a.m., Arboretum Terrace Garden
“Container Gardening”
Learn about container gardening from docent Mary Horton. She will discuss planting in multiple layers and grouping a variety of containers of different types and sizes to create depth and density. Saturday, November 19, 11:00 a.m., Gazebo
“November in the White Flower Garden”
The White Flower Garden in the arboretum features plants with white flowers and white, gray, or silvery foliage. The luminous garden was designed for year-round interest and is beautiful in late autumn. Learn about plants for the autumn garden from docent Don Christiansen.


Back to top ^

MountainFilm in Davis, November 4, 2005
The best of Telluride’s MountainFilm on Tour is returning to Davis for the second year, sponsored by the John Muir Institute of the Environment. New films will be showcased – environmental, cultural, mountain, and adventure films and video – mostly from the 27th annual MountainFilm shown in Telluride in spring 2005. The event occurs at the Varsity Theatre, 612 Second Street, Davis, on Friday, November 4, 7:00 to 10:00 p.m. (the doors open at 6:30 p.m.) Tickets are $10 and are available through the John Muir Institute of the Environment or at Armadillo Music (205 F Street, Davis). For additional ticket information, visit: http://johnmuir.ucdavis.edu/filmseries/tickets.html. Contact:
John Muir Institute of the Environment
(530) 752-5643



Back to top ^

ASUCD-Community Blood Drive, November 7–9, 2005
Staff, faculty, alumni, and students can donate blood during the blood drive next week in Freeborn Hall at these times:
   Monday, November 7: 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
   Tuesday and Wednesday, November 8–9: 10:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Departmental release time is appropriate for staff wishing to donate. To alleviate waiting times, there will be a special section for faculty and staff. Everyone who participates will receive a T-shirt.

Contact:
Angela Tarricone
(800) 995-4420 ext. 11007


Back to top ^

Pistachio Production Short Course, November 8–10, 2005
The 2005 Pistachio Production Short Course is designed to deliver the latest research-based production practices to pistachio growers, production managers, and pest control consultants. The course covers the economics of establishment and production, orchard site selection and development, cultivars and rootstocks, production practices, pest management, and postharvest handling. The course is held every five years; this 2005 program will be in Fresno. For more information on the program and how to register, see:
http://ucce.ucdavis.edu/calendar/eventdisplay.cfm?caleventnum=9015 Contact:
Donna Seaver
Department of Plant Sciences
(530) 754-9708
[email protected]


Back to top ^

A Conversation with Bruce Babbitt, November 11, 2005
Bruce Babbitt, former U.S. Secretary of the Interior, will speak in the AGR Room, Buehler Alumni and Visitors Center, on Friday, November 11, from 10 to 11 a.m. Babbitt will address how we can build the future that we want to live in, including land use policy and preservation of the natural world. His new book, Cities in the Wilderness, will be available for purchase during the event, and Babbitt will sign books after his presentation. Bruce Babbitt was U.S. Secretary of the Interior during Bill Clinton’s administration, and was governor of Arizona from 1978 to 1987. The event, sponsored by the John Muir Institute of the Environment, is free and open to the public. Be aware that it is occurring on a university holiday, so there should be plenty of available parking. Contact:
John Muir Institute of the Environment
(530) 752-5643


Back to top ^

Connecting with Alumni: Orchestrating a Win-Win, November 16, 2005
Richard Engel, director of college relations for the Dean’s Office, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, will present “Connecting with Alumni: Orchestrating a Win-Win” as part of the CA&ES Communications Series on November 16, 2005, 10–11 a.m., in Room 203 Mrak Hall. The session will cover college/campus programs and services that support your alumni, keeping track of your alumni, and how to involve alumni in your activities and goals. There is no cost for CA&ES personnel to attend, but pre-registration is requested. Contact:
Karen Scott
(530) 754-8578
[email protected]


Back to top ^

The Web: Balancing Content, Creativity, Compliance, November 30, 2005
John Weston, Webmaster for the Dean’s Office, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, will present “The Web: Balancing Content, Creativity, Compliance” as part of the CA&ES Communications Series on Wednesday, November 30, 2005, 10–11 a.m., in Room 203 Mrak Hall.

The session will cover college and campus Web standards, policies, and compliance issues (including the Americans with Disabilities Act). There will be time for questions and answers. There is no cost for CA&ES personnel to attend, but pre-registration is requested.

Contact:
Karen Scott
(530) 754-8578
[email protected]


Back to top ^

National Science Foundation Workshop, November 30–December 1, 2005
The National Science Foundation (NSF) and California State University, Sacramento (CSUS), will hold a one-day workshop on Thursday, December 1, 2005, for those who want to learn more about the NSF and its programs. The workshop will provide an overview of the foundation, its mission, priorities, proposal and merit review process, and budget. Representatives from five NSF directorates (biological sciences; mathematical and physical sciences; computer and information science and engineering; social, behavioral, and economic sciences; and engineering) will present their programs and will be available for discussions of potential research proposals. On Wednesday, November 30, 2005, NSF and CSUS will host two FastLane tutorial sessions. FastLane is NSF’s Web-based, real-time, interactive system for conducting business with the foundation. All proposals to NSF must be submitted through FastLane. The FastLane session for grants administrators will be held from 12:30 to 2:20 p.m.; the session for PIs will be held from 3:00 to 5:00 p.m. Space is limited and available on a first-come, first-served basis. There is no registration fee for the workshop, but pre-registration is required. Contact George Wilson at NSF for a registration form, and register by Friday, November 25, 2005. The workshop will be at the University Union on the CSUS campus. George Wilson
National Science Foundation
Arlington, VA
(703) 292-7733
[email protected]


Back to top ^

Breeding with Molecular Markers, February 8–9, 2006
The Seed Biotechnology Center is presenting a two-day course that covers strategies for using molecular tools in different breeding schemes and crops. Leading industry and university experts will guide participants on how, when, and what types of molecular markers should be used in breeding programs, including marker-assisted selection, accelerated backcrossing, and quantitative trait loci. The course is aimed at professionals who are involved in plant breeding and germplasm improvement. For more information or to enroll, see
http://sbc.ucdavis.edu/Events/Breeding_with_Molecular_Markers_-_February_2006.htm. Contact:
Sue Webster
Seed Biotechnology Center
(530) 754-7333
[email protected]


Back to top ^

 


Visit CA&ES Currents online at http://caes.ucdavis.edu/NewsEvents/currents.

CA&ES Currents, the faculty/staff newsletter of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at UC Davis, is published on the first and third Thursday of each month (in July and August, only on the first Thursday.)

News deadline is noon Monday preceding Thursday publication. Send news items to editor, [email protected].

Issue Editor:
Ann Filmer
(530) 754-6788
[email protected]

Contributors: Ann Filmer, Thomas Kaiser, Rhoda McKnight, Neal Van Alfen, John Weston.

Some Web links cited in this newsletter may be inaccessible to off-campus sites. If you want to view the full stories on the Web from off campus, you will need to provide a username and password the first time you try to view a story: username: clips password: newz

To be added to or deleted from this electronic newsletter list, please write to [email protected].

The University of California does not discriminate in any of its policies, procedures or practices. The university is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer.

 

Student News

Design It, Build It

Aug 21, 2015 Truscott donation allows landscape architecture students to dig in.

Student News - More Student News…
Research News

UC Davis Receives Unique, $1.5 Million Gift from Aggie Couple

Jul 07, 2016 Michael and Joelle Hurlston have pledged $1.5 million to endow a first-of-its-kind chair position.

Research News - More Research News…
Outreach News

Summer Internships

Jul 28, 2015 CA&ES students and Salinas Valley employers find common ground.

Outreach News - More Outreach News…