CA&ES Currents Newsletter  icon newspaper

November 17, 2005

Jun 03, 2014 admin


MESSAGE FROM THE DEAN
A Message from Dean Neal Van Alfen: A New Plan for the College

WHO
Thomas Scott: Mosquitoes and Dengue Fever
Adam Getchell: Director, CA&ES Information Technology
Bennett, Hastings, Leal: Elected to AAAS

IN THE NEWS
Agroterrorism and Food Safety: Jerry Gillespie Prepares
China’s Growing Food Market: Colin Carter Responds

WHAT
Western Center for Agricultural Health and Safety: Seminars
Undergraduate Admissions: Web Site Redesign
Plant Breeding Academy
Arboretum Events: November

WHAT
The Web: Balancing Content, Creativity, Compliance; November 30, 2005
National Science Foundation Workshop; November 30–December 1, 2005
Pesticide Illness: New Tools and Technological Advances; December 5, 2005
Breeding with Molecular Markers; February 8–9, 2006

A Message from Dean Neal Van Alfen: A New Plan for the College
Our college is operating from an academic and strategic plan that was written during the 1998–99 academic year. Much has occurred since that plan was written, including significant cuts in our Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension budgets. We are coming close to having absorbed those budget cuts.

Given the changes in the environment in which we operate, it is time for the college to start another planning process. In consultation with the Dean’s Council and our department chairs, a planning committee led by Professor Susan Harrison of the Department of Environmental Science and Policy has been appointed and charged to draft a new plan for the college.

We have asked the committee to present a compelling vision for the future of our college and its role both on our campus and within California. We are specifically asking that the planning be inclusive of our responsibilities to the Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension as well as to our campus academic mission.

The committee has been charged to seek broad input from faculty, staff, and our external stakeholders in their preparation of the plan. I invite all of our college community to participate in the planning of our college’s future.

As always, I value your feedback. If you have questions or comments, please e-mail me.

Neal K. Van Alfen
Dean
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
[email protected]


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Thomas Scott: Mosquitoes and Dengue Fever
Thomas Scott, an entomology professor specializing in mosquitoes and vector-borne viral diseases, received two major grants to study mosquito control and dengue fever.

Scott is part of a consortium that received more than $50 million from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to develop prevention and treatment strategies for malaria and dengue fever. Scott will manage field sites in Peru for testing mosquito-control techniques and products aimed at preventing transmission of dengue fever.

Scott also received more than $2 million from UC Irvine, which is directing a $20 million dengue fever research project. "These awards constitute an unprecedented opportunity . . . to develop and evaluate novel strategies and products for preventing some of the most important mosquito-borne diseases worldwide," Scott said. The researchers will examine how mosquitoes might be genetically modified to reduce their ability to transmit the virus and how to reduce or eliminate mosquito populations.

Dengue fever is caused by a virus transmitted to people by the mosquito species, Aedes aegypti. The disease is established in more than 100 countries, primarily in Southeast Asia and the Western Pacific, as well as in Africa, the Americas, and the Eastern Mediterranean.

An estimated 50 million cases of dengue infection occur annually worldwide, including 100 to 200 cases reported each year in the United States. Approximately 20,000 people, mostly children, die each year from the disease. Dengue virus causes three diseases: dengue fever, dengue shock syndrome, and dengue hemorrhagic fever.

UC Davis News Service
http://www.news.ucdavis.edu/search/news_detail.lasso?id=7532

Thomas Scott
(530) 754-4196
[email protected]


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Adam Getchell: Director, CA&ES Information Technology
Adam Getchell is the new director of Information Technology for the CA&ES Dean’s Office. Getchell has worked in the information technology arena on campus for the past 11 years, including positions in campus Information and Educational Technology, Human Resources, and the CA&ES Dean’s Office.

Getchell collaborated with a number of different units on campus and established many partnerships. He has broad technical knowledge and a strong commitment to customer service. Please join us in welcoming Adam to his new role in the CA&ES Dean’s Office.

Adam Getchell
(530) 752-9284
[email protected]


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Bennett, Hastings, Leal: Elected to AAAS
Three faculty members from the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences have been elected as fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

Founded in 1848, the association describes itself as the world's largest general scientific society, advancing science through initiatives in science policy, international programs, science education, and other areas. It also publishes the journal Science.

Plant scientist Alan Bennett, a professor and an associate vice chancellor for research in the area of technology and industry alliances, was elected in the association's agriculture, food, and renewable resources section. He was recognized for his contributions to the biology of fruit ripening and for leadership in creating new avenues to transfer fundamental scientific discoveries into agricultural practice.

Alan Hastings, professor of environmental science and policy, is an expert at using mathematical models to predict changes in populations of plants and animals over time and space, and in using ideas from complex dynamics to study problems in ecology.

Entomology professor Walter Leal, elected in the association's biological sciences section, was recognized for his contributions to the field of chemical ecology and for pioneering work in the physiology of pheromone reception in insects. His research focuses on the molecular basis of the highly selective and sensitive olfactory system, which enables insects to smell.

Other UC Davis faculty elected to AAAS this year are Robert Cardiff, Cheuk-Yiu Ng, and Neelima Roy Sinha.

Dateline UC Davis
http://www.dateline.ucdavis.edu/dl_detail.lasso?id=8506

Alan Bennett
(530) 297-4496
[email protected]

Alan Hastings
(530) 752-8116
[email protected]

Walter Leal
(530) 752-7755
[email protected]


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Agroterrorism and Food Safety: Jerry Gillespie Prepares
Farmworkers are being trained to report possible agroterrorism or other biosecurity breeches, according to Jerry Gillespie, director of the Western Institute for Food Safety and Security (WIFSS), which is located on campus.

An article in The Fresno Bee covers steps being taken by Gillespie and some agricultural companies to prepare for and avert possible agroterrorism. Workers are being trained to identify the first symptoms of incidents such as foot-and-mouth disease in dairies, or other situations that involve food contamination.

Pilot training courses on agroterrorism have been conducted by the Western Institute for Food Safety and Security in several California counties, with additional training courses being planned.

The Fresno Bee
http://www.news.ucdavis.edu/in_the_news/full_text/view_clip.lasso?id=13161

Jerry Gillespie
WIFSS
(530) 757-5757
[email protected]


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China’s Growing Food Market: Colin Carter Responds
“China’s huge population and rising standard of living have U.S. farmers hoping the Chinese will cross culinary lines and sample fare that’s a little more foreign to them,” according to an article by the Associated Press, in which agricultural producers and officials in the U.S. express a desire to market more U.S. agricultural products in China. “China likely will have little choice but to become a larger importer of food as its economy develops fast and living standards rise steadily.”

It may be a long shot, though, to get the Chinese to consume more western foods, particularly dairy products. “Colin Carter, a professor of agricultural and resource economics [at UC Davis], said that while the urbanization of China is driving a change in tastes, there’s nothing to suggest New York farmers will be greatly successful there, especially with dairy products,” according to the article. “‘I still think it’s a niche market,’ Carter said. ‘The Asian palate is not conducive to dairy products in general.’”

China has a quarter of the world’s population and 6 percent of the world’s arable land.

The Associated Press
http://www.news.ucdavis.edu/in_the_news/full_text/view_clip.lasso?id=13167

Colin Carter
(530) 752-6054
[email protected]


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Western Center for Agricultural Health and Safety: Seminars
“Pesticide Illness: New Tools and Technological Advances,” December 5, 2005
Robert Schlag, chief of the Pesticide Epidemiology Unit, Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, Cal/EPA

“Ergonomics and Musculoskeletal Injury in Agricultural Populations,” January 9, 2006
Julia Faucett, professor and chair, Community Health Systems, University of California, San Francisco

“The Dangers of Agroterrorism: Strategies for Preparedness,” February 6, 2006
Jerry Gillespie, director, Western Institute for Food Safety and Security

“Endotoxin and Organic Dust Lung Disease,” March 6, 2006
Stephen Reynolds, professor and director, Center for Agricultural Health and Safety, Colorado State University

“Creating a Culture of Safety,” April 3, 2006
Beverlie Milone, health and safety manager, Fetzer Vineyards

“Health and Safety in Large Dairies,” May 1, 2006
Frank Mitloehner, specialist in Cooperative Extension, Department of Animal Science, UC Davis

“Documenting the Human Impacts of Current Pesticide Use Practices,” June 5, 2006
Margaret Reeves, scientist, Pesticide Action Network

All seminars in this 2005–06 series are held from 4 to 5 p.m. in Hart Hall, Room 3201. The series is sponsored by the Western Center for Agricultural Health and Safety, the Masters of Public Health Program, the Small Farm Center, and the Center for Environmental Health Sciences. More details about the series will soon be posted on the Web site for the Western Center for Agricultural Health and Safety, http://agcenter.ucdavis.edu/.

Contact:
Stephen McCurdy
Western Center for Agricultural Health and Safety
(530) 752-8051
[email protected]


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Undergraduate Admissions: Web Site Redesign
The Undergraduate Admissions Web site for the campus, http://admissions.ucdavis.edu, has been redesigned. Visitors to the site -- including prospective students, parents, faculty, staff, and school counselors -- will find a visual showcase of more than 100 major pages, new audience sections for parents and counselors, and a Spanish-speaking section for parents. It also articulates the UC Davis undergraduate experience by illustrating how students “learn passionately, discover solutions, and engage the world.”

"We knew from student feedback that our original Admissions site was easy-to-use and informative," said Pam Burnett, director of undergraduate admissions. "The new design retains that user-friendly environment while elevating the visibility of our academic programs and the undergraduate experience at UC Davis."

The launch of the redesigned site coincides with the University of California fall 2006 application period, which runs Nov. 1–30. Prospective students can connect to the UC online application for admission and scholarships from the UC Davis Admissions home page.

Tom Hinds
Undergraduate Admissions
(530) 754-7732
[email protected]


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Plant Breeding Academy
The Seed Biotechnology Center is organizing a professional development course to teach plant breeding principles to seed industry personnel so that they can become better plant breeders. The two-year course will occur at UC Davis for one week per quarter over two years (eight sessions), starting in fall 2006. Readings and exercises will continue between sessions via the Internet to allow participants to maintain their current positions while enrolled in the course.

The course is targeted toward personnel in private breeding programs who lack the academic background in genetics theory and practice to advance as independent breeders. Current breeders who desire a refresher course or want to broaden their expertise are also potential participants.

For additional information, see http://sbc.ucdavis.edu/Events/Plant_Breeding_Academy.htm.

Sue Webster
Seed Biotechnology Center
(530) 754-7333
[email protected]


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Arboretum Events: November
The following guided tour is free and open to the public. For additional information, contact the UC Davis Arboretum at http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/.

Saturday, November 19, 11:00 a.m., Gazebo
“November in the White Flower Garden”
The White Flower Garden in the arboretum features plants with white flowers and white, gray, or silvery foliage. The luminous garden was designed for year-round interest and is beautiful in late autumn. Learn about plants for the autumn garden from docent Don Christiansen.


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The Web: Balancing Content, Creativity, Compliance; November 30, 2005
John Weston, Webmaster for the Dean’s Office, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, will present “The Web: Balancing Content, Creativity, Compliance” as part of the CA&ES Communications Series on Wednesday, November 30, 2005, 10–11 a.m., in Mrak Hall, Room 203.

The session will cover college and campus Web standards, policies, and compliance issues (including the Americans with Disabilities Act). There will be time for questions and answers. There is no cost for CA&ES personnel to attend, but pre-registration is requested.

Contact:
Karen Scott
(530) 754-8578
[email protected]


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National Science Foundation Workshop; November 30–December 1, 2005
The National Science Foundation (NSF) and California State University, Sacramento (CSUS), will hold a one-day workshop on Thursday, December 1, 2005, for those who want to learn more about the NSF and its programs. The workshop will provide an overview of the foundation, its mission, priorities, proposal and merit review process, and budget. Representatives from five NSF directorates (biological sciences; mathematical and physical sciences; computer and information science and engineering; social, behavioral, and economic sciences; and engineering) will present their programs and will be available for discussions of potential research proposals. On Wednesday, November 30, NSF and CSUS will host two FastLane tutorial sessions. FastLane is NSF’s Web-based, real-time, interactive system for conducting business with the foundation. All proposals to NSF must be submitted through FastLane. The FastLane session for grants administrators will be held from 12:30 to 2:20 p.m.; the session for PIs will be held from 3:00 to 5:00 p.m. Space is limited and available on a first-come, first-served basis. There is no registration fee for the workshop, but pre-registration is required. Contact George Wilson at NSF for a registration form, and register by Friday, November 25. The workshop will be at the University Union on the CSUS campus. George Wilson
National Science Foundation
Arlington, VA
(703) 292-7733
[email protected]


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Pesticide Illness: New Tools and Technological Advances; December 5, 2005
Robert Schlag, chief of the Pesticide Epidemiology Unit, Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, Cal/EPA, will speak on “Pesticide Illness: New Tools and Technological Advances.” The seminar will be held Monday, December 5, 4 to 5 p.m. in Hart Hall, Room 3201.

The seminar is sponsored by the Western Center for Agricultural Health and Safety, the Masters of Public Health Program, the Small Farm Center, and the Center for Environmental Health Sciences.

Contact:
Stephen McCurdy
Western Center for Agricultural Health and Safety
(530) 752-8051
[email protected]


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Breeding with Molecular Markers; February 8–9, 2006
The Seed Biotechnology Center is presenting a two-day course that covers strategies for using molecular tools in different breeding schemes and crops. Leading industry and university experts will guide participants on how, when, and what types of molecular markers should be used in breeding programs, including marker-assisted selection, accelerated backcrossing, and quantitative trait loci.

The course is aimed at professionals who are involved in plant breeding and germplasm improvement. For more information or to enroll, see http://sbc.ucdavis.edu/Events/Breeding_with_Molecular_Markers_-_February_2006.htm.

Sue Webster
Seed Biotechnology Center
(530) 754-7333
[email protected]


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Visit CA&ES Currents online at http://caes.ucdavis.edu/NewsEvents/currents.

CA&ES Currents, the faculty/staff newsletter of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at UC Davis, is published on the first and third Thursday of each month (in July and August, only on the first Thursday.)

News deadline is noon Monday preceding Thursday publication. Send news items to editor, [email protected].

Issue Editor:
Ann Filmer
(530) 754-6788
[email protected]

Contributors: Ann Filmer, Thomas Kaiser, Rhoda McKnight, Neal Van Alfen, John Weston.

Some Web links cited in this newsletter may be inaccessible to off-campus sites. If you want to view the full stories on the Web from off campus, you will need to provide a username and password the first time you try to view a story: username: clips password: newz

To be added to or deleted from this electronic newsletter list, please write to [email protected].

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