CA&ES Currents Newsletter  icon newspaper

February 02, 2006

May 29, 2014 admin


Message from the Dean
A Message from Dean Neal Van Alfen: AES Faculty Meeting

Who
Gregory Lanzaro: Director, Center for Vectorborne Diseases

In The News
Heart-Healthy Chocolate: Hagen Schroeter, Carl Keen
China as a Wine Customer?: Daniel Sumner, Scott Rozelle
Animal Personalities: Andy Sih, Jason Watters, Alison Bell, Judy Stamps

What
CA&ES IMPACT Statements
Call for Papers -- The Future of Agriculture: Science, Stewardship, and Sustainability
Atmospheric Aerosols and Health: Graduate Training Program
Academic and Strategic Planning Committee
Arboretum Events
Ogawa Research and Teaching Endowment

When
The Dangers of Agroterrorism: Strategies for Preparedness; February 6, 2006
Riki Ott, Exxon Valdez Spill Expert; February 7, 2006
Hunger in the Fields; February 7, 2006
Breeding with Molecular Markers; February 8–9, 2006
California’s Immigrant Farmworkers; February 14, 2006
Hell and High Water in the Delta: California's Water Supply; February 14, 2006
Design as Visual Functional Expression; February 15, 2006
A Village Coming Home; February 21, 2006
Agustin Huneeus: Liquid Sugar Lecture; February 23, 2006
Building Communities; February 28, 2006
Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Field Day; March 3–4, 2006
Ted Sommer: Sacramento River, River of Life; March 10, 2006
Genomics for Agriculture; March 15–16, 2006
Terroir 2006; March 19–22, 2006
Water Resources Coordinating Conference; April 25–26, 2006


A Message from Dean Neal Van Alfen: AES Faculty Meeting
During last week’s meeting of the faculty with Agricultural Experiment Station (AES) appointments, the importance of outreach was emphasized during the presentations and discussions. The AES resources are much like grant funds -- they are provided with specific expectations from those who receive these funds as part of their salaries. We are expected to do mission-oriented research and to provide the results of our research to our stakeholders.

As faculty we are very familiar with how to provide our research information to our research peers through professional publications and meetings, but we need to be more diligent about finding ways to provide our research results to our stakeholders. This is becoming even more important as we develop strategies to try to rebuild the AES budget.

Many of our stakeholders feel that we are not as engaged in solving their problems as I know we are. We currently have 572 AES research projects aimed at solving problems of importance to California, and we have one of the nation’s most highly regarded AES research programs as judged by our peers, but we need to be more effective in letting our stakeholders know what we are doing for them. Without their support the AES as we know it could disappear.

As always, I value your feedback. If you have questions or comments, please e-mail me.

Neal K. Van Alfen
Dean
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
[email protected]

 

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Gregory Lanzaro: Director, Center for Vectorborne Diseases

 

Greg Lanzaro, Cooperative Extension specialist in entomology and director of the UC Mosquito Research Program (UCMRP), is the new director of the UC Davis Center for Vectorborne Diseases (CVEC). Dean Neal Van Alfen said, “Dr. Lanzaro maintains a world-class research program on arthropod-borne diseases. His leadership will assure that UC Davis remains a leader in addressing the global problem of vector-borne diseases."

According to Lanzaro, “Pathogens transmitted by insects and their relatives rank among the most important infectious diseases globally. Diseases such as malaria, dengue, and leishmaniasis take millions of lives annually. . . .” Lanzaro noted that CVEC “is interdisciplinary (encompassing biological, medical, veterinary, and social sciences) and global, with a major emphasis on work in the developing world, where arthropod-borne diseases impose the heaviest burden.”

The Center for Vectorborne Diseases is a unit of the School of Veterinary Medicine and managed in collaboration with the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and the School of Medicine. CVEC has long been affiliated with UCMRP and the vectorborne diseases program of the California Department of Health Services.

Gregory Lanzaro
[email protected]

 

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Heart-Healthy Chocolate: Hagen Schroeter, Carl Keen

 

In a multifaceted study involving the Kuna Indians of Panama, an international team of scientists has pinpointed a chemical compound that is, in part, responsible for the heart-healthy benefits of certain cocoas and some chocolate products. The researchers hope the findings will lead to new dietary or medicinal methods for improving and maintaining cardiovascular health. Hagen Schroeter and Carl Keen, faculty in the Department of Nutrition, co-authored the paper, along with researchers from the Heinrich-Heine University in Germany and from Harvard Medical School.

UC Davis News Service
http://www.news.ucdavis.edu/search/news_detail.lasso?id=7599

Hagen Schroeter
(530) 752-3003
[email protected]

Carl Keen
(530) 752-6331
[email protected]

 

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China as a Wine Customer?: Daniel Sumner, Scott Rozelle

 

Although China may not be a competitor in the international wine export market in the near future, there is a promise that China could become a customer of California wines. An article in Ag Alert, the California Farm Bureau Federation newsletter, reported the findings of Professors Daniel Sumner and Scott Rozelle, agricultural and resource economics, which were presented at a grape symposium in Fresno. The article noted that it will take a considerable effort to increase Chinese consumption of California wines and that China will not soon become a significant competitor in the international wine market.

Ag Alert
http://www.news.ucdavis.edu/in_the_news/full_text/view_clip.lasso?id=13962

Daniel Sumner
(530) 752-1668
[email protected]

Scott Rozelle
(530) 752-9897
[email protected]

 

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Animal Personalities: Andy Sih, Jason Watters, Alison Bell, Judy Stamps

 

An article in the New York Times Sunday magazine focused on animal personality. Andy Sih, chair of environmental science and policy, addresses personality differences in a Darwinian context in the article. The work of Jason Watters and Alison Bell, two of Sih’s postdocs, is highlighted. Professor Judy Stamps’ research on fruit fly behavior – fruit flies can be territorial and aggressive – is also covered.

New York Times>
http://www.news.ucdavis.edu/in_the_news/full_text/view_clip.lasso?id=13930

Andy Sih
(530) 754-7243
[email protected]

Judy Stamps
(530) 752-3622
[email protected]

 

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CA&ES IMPACT Statements

 

Two new IMPACT sheets, produced by the CA&ES Dean’s Office, are focused on “Mexican American Families” and “Developing Healthy Infant Formulas.” IMPACT sheets are designed to inform external lay audiences, stakeholders, and others about the impact of specific research projects underway in our college. They are a useful outreach tool for a variety of audiences. All IMPACTs can be viewed online at http://caes.ucdavis.edu/News/Impact/Default.htm.

If you have worked on or know of successful projects within the college that are of interest to stakeholders and external audiences and may meet the criteria of IMPACT, contact Ann Filmer in the Dean’s Office.

Ann Filmer
(530) 754-6788
[email protected]

 

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Call for Papers -- The Future of Agriculture: Science, Stewardship, and Sustainability

 

An international conference, “The Future of Agriculture: Science, Stewardship, and Sustainability,” will be held August 7–9, 2006, in Sacramento. The conference is sponsored by the US EPA ORD Hazardous Substance Technical Liaisons Program, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, the Midwest Hazardous Substance Research Center, and the California EPA.

Conference participants may submit an abstract for an oral or a poster presentation by Wednesday, March 1, 2006. Complete conference and paper submission information can be found at http://www.dce.ksu.edu/dce/conf/ag&environment/.

Ellen Stauffer
Kansas State University (central standard time)
(785) 532-2562
[email protected]

 

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Atmospheric Aerosols and Health: Graduate Training Program

 

Few Ph.D. students graduating from U.S. institutions are exposed to diverse air quality topics in a way that enables them to assist government and industry to solve air quality problems in a cost-effective manner. The Atmospheric Aerosols and Health (AAH) graduate training program is looking for new and continuing graduate students interested in studying topics related to air quality and its effects on health.

The goal of the AAH Program is to facilitate the focused, disciplinary research training of graduate students as well as provide a broad, multidisciplinary exposure to air quality issues. Students from all graduate groups and departments are eligible to apply. Up to two years of funding (including a salary of approximately $21,000 per year) is available on a competitive basis. More information and applications are available at http://aah.ucdavis.edu.

Marie Boisvert
Atmospheric Aerosols & Health Lead Campus Program
(530) 754-9646
[email protected]

 

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Academic and Strategic Planning Committee

 

Susan Harrison, professor in environmental science and policy, chairs the college’s Academic and Strategic Planning Committee, which was formed in December, 2005. Minutes from the committee meetings can be viewed at http://caes.ucdavis.edu/FacStaff/ASPC/Default.htm.

Susan Harrison
(530) 752-7110
[email protected]

 

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Arboretum Events

 

The guided tours listed below are free and open to the public. For more information, visit the arboretum Web site: http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu.

“Container Gardening”; Saturday, February 4, 11 a.m., Arboretum Terrace Garden
Docent Mary Horton will discuss planting in multiple layers and grouping containers of different types and sizes to create depth and density.

“Walk With Warren”; Wednesday, February 8, 12 noon, Arboretum Gazebo
Join arboretum superintendent Warren Roberts for a lunchtime stroll in the arboretum. Enjoy the winter weather, learn about the arboretum’s collections, and get a little exercise.

“First Signs of Spring”; Sunday, February 12, 2 p.m., Buehler Alumni and Visitors Center
Spring is almost here, and the natural world is bursting with new life and renewal. Docent Kate Mawdsley will point out fresh green shoots, swelling buds, and the earliest blossoms. She will also discuss the bird, bat, and insect pollinators that keep the whole ecosystem humming.

“Acacias Along the Creek”; Saturday, February 18, 11 a.m., Arboretum Headquarters
Enjoy a free tour of the acacia collection in the arboretum. Acacias, a group of trees and shrubs native mainly to Australia and Africa, are popular with gardeners for their billowing clouds of fragrant yellow or gold flowers. Docent Edith Vermeij will lead the tour.

“Microclimates in Your Garden”; Sunday, February 26, 2 p.m., Arboretum Terrace Garden
Nearly every home landscape offers a range of microclimates with different plants thriving in each microclimate zone. Learn how to find the right place for every plant. Docent Taffy Bandman will show you how to do a microclimate audit of your garden.

 

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Ogawa Research and Teaching Endowment

 

The Joseph M. Ogawa Research and Teaching Endowment Committee in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences is accepting proposals from undergraduate and graduate students, and postdoctoral researchers for research projects addressing production problems of temperate zone tree fruit and nut crops.

In addition, proposals are requested for educational programs, extension activities, and field short courses benefiting UC students in the fields of plant pathology and pomology, and in the California fruit and nut industries. Proposals may be submitted by students, staff, or faculty.

Awards must be expended in support of undergraduates, graduate students, postgraduate researchers, and faculty/staff within the UC system. Up to four $1,000 awards are available in 2006. Include a letter of application, a research proposal (fewer than 1,500 words), and a letter of support from a UC faculty member or department chair.

The application deadline is February 15, 2006. Please address applications to The Ogawa Endowment Committee, c/o Donna Gutierrez, Dean’s Office, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, University of California, Davis, CA 95616-8571.

Donna Gutierrez
CA&ES Dean’s Office
(530) 754-8961
[email protected]

 

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The Dangers of Agroterrorism: Strategies for Preparedness; February 6, 2006

 

Jerry Gillespie, director of the Western Institute for Food Safety and Security, will present a seminar, “The Dangers of Agroterrorism: Strategies for Preparedness,” on Monday, February 6, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 3201, Hart Hall.

The seminar is sponsored by the Western Center for Agricultural Health and Safety, the Masters of Public Health Program, the Small Farm Center, and the Center for Environmental Health Sciences.

Stephen McCurdy
Western Center for Agricultural Health and Safety
(530) 752-8051
[email protected]

 

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Riki Ott, Exxon Valdez Spill Expert; February 7, 2006

 

Scientist, activist, and author Riki Ott will give a lecture that weaves the legacy of the Exxon Valdez spill into current issues of public health, environmental pollution, and our energy future. Ott helps the public understand the effects of oil and other contaminants on water quality and aquatic ecosystems. She was on the scene at the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill, witnessing the environmental devastation, economic losses to the fishing industry, and psychosocial trauma to the close-knit community.

 

Ott will speak in the AGR room at the Buehler Alumni and Visitors Center on Tuesday, February 7, at 4:00 p.m. Following her presentation, Ott will sign copies of her book “Sound Truth and Corporate Myths: The Legacy of the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill.”

John Muir Institute of the Environment
(530) 752-5643
[email protected]

 

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Hunger in the Fields; February 7, 2006

 

Cathy Wirth, a graduate student in international agriculture and development, will present “Hunger in the Fields: Food Insecurity Among California Farmworkers” on Tuesday, February 7, 4:00 p.m., in Room 101, Bowley Science Center.

Her presentation is part of the “Agriculture, Food, and Community Series,” sponsored by the plant sciences department, SAREP, the Student Farm, and several other organizations.

Mark Van Horn
(530) 752-7645
[email protected]

 

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Breeding with Molecular Markers; February 8–9, 2006

 

The Seed Biotechnology Center is presenting a two-day course that covers strategies for using molecular tools in different breeding schemes and crops. Leading industry and university experts will guide participants on how, when, and what types of molecular markers should be used in breeding programs, including marker-assisted selection, accelerated backcrossing, and quantitative trait loci.

The course is aimed at professionals who are involved in plant breeding and germplasm improvement. For more information or to enroll, see http://sbc.ucdavis.edu/Events/Breeding_with_Molecular_Markers_-_February_2006.htm.

Sue Webster
Seed Biotechnology Center
(530) 754-7333
[email protected]

 

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California’s Immigrant Farmworkers; February 14, 2006

 

Luis Magana, with Project Voice for Immigrants, American Friends Service Committee, will present “California’s Immigrant Farmworkers: The Perspective from the Field” on Tuesday, February 14, 4:00 p.m., in Room 101, Bowley Science Center.

His presentation is part of the “Agriculture, Food, and Community Series,” sponsored by the plant sciences department, SAREP, the Student Farm, and several other organizations.

Mark Van Horn
(530) 752-7645
[email protected]

 

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Hell and High Water in the Delta: California's Water Supply; February 14, 2006

 

Jeff Mount, director of the UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences, will speak at the California Colloquium on Water monthly lecture series, hosted by the Water Resources Center Archives, on the UC Berkeley campus. Mount’s lecture, “Hell and High Water in the Delta: The Fate of California’s Water Supply Hub,” on February 14, will follow a reception to meet Mount and others interested in water issues.

Reception: 4:45 to 5:30 p.m. at the Water Resources Center Archives, 410 O’Brien Hall. Lecture: 5:30 to 7:00 p.m. at the Goldman School of Public Policy, Room 250, 2607 Hearst Ave. at LeRoy (northeast side of the UC Berkeley campus).

Paige Wooden
Water Resources Center Archives
UC Berkeley
(510) 642-2666

 

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Design as Visual Functional Expression; February 15, 2006

 

Laurie Lewis, design manager for University Communications, will present “Design as a Visual Functional Expression” as part of the CA&ES Communications Series on Wednesday, February 15, 2006, 10 to 11 a.m., in Mrak Hall, Room 203.

This workshop will cover basic design elements – including specific colors, fonts, and logos – and how they are integrated into campus print and Web communications. Learn where to find these elements, how to use them, and how you can benefit from UC Davis branding. There is no cost for CA&ES personnel to attend, but pre-registration is requested.

Karen Scott
CA&ES Dean’s Office
(530) 754-8578
[email protected]

 

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A Village Coming Home; February 21, 2006

 

Ed Mata and Eddie Tanner, with the United Indian Health Services in Arcata, will present “A Village Coming Home” on Tuesday, February 21, 4:00 p.m., in Room 101, Bowley Science Center.

Their presentation is part of the “Agriculture, Food, and Community Series,” sponsored by the plant sciences department, SAREP, the Student Farm, and several other organizations.

Mark Van Horn
(530) 752-7645
[email protected]

 

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Agustin Huneeus: Liquid Sugar Lecture; February 23, 2006

 

The Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics will hold its 2005–2006 Liquid Sugars Lecture on February 23, 2006, with a presentation by Agustin Huneeus of Quintessa Winery. Huneeus will share insights from his long and illustrious career in the wine industry, including experience in marketing and production at a variety of firms, ranging from Seagram's to Quintessa.

The lecture will be held at 4:00 p.m. in the AGR Room, Buehler Alumni and Visitors Center, and will be followed by a reception. Huneeus's visit is cosponsored by the Department of Viticulture and Enology, the Center for Wine Economics and Business, and the Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science.

Rachael Goodhue
Agricultural and Resource Economics
(530) 754-7812
[email protected]

 

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Building Communities; February 28, 2006

 

Catherine Sneed, from the Garden Project, San Francisco, will present “Building Communities” on Tuesday, February 28, 4:00 p.m., in Room 101, Bowley Science Center. Sneed runs the successful and renowned prison garden program at the San Francisco County Jail.

Her presentation is part of the “Agriculture, Food, and Community Series,” sponsored by the plant sciences department, SAREP, the Student Farm, and several other organizations.

Mark Van Horn
(530) 752-7645
[email protected]

 

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Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Field Day; March 3–4, 2006

 

The California Association of FFA and 4-H high-school students from California and surrounding states will gather on campus for the annual Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Field Day. The students will compete in 27 contests ranging from livestock judging to agriculture computer applications. The contests are coordinated by UC Davis students, with campus faculty and staff members serving as contest advisers. More information about the event is available at http://caes.ucdavis.edu/Events/FieldDay.htm.

Stacie Hewitt
CA&ES Dean’s Office
(530) 754-9083
[email protected]

 

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Ted Sommer: Sacramento River, River of Life; March 10, 2006

 

The Sacramento River, the largest and most important river in California, provides water to 22 million people and serves the fifth largest economy in the world. The Landscape Architecture Program is offering a weekly seminar series this quarter that addresses pressing issues in river management and restoration.

Ted Sommer, a senior environmental scientist with the California Department of Water Resources, and with research interests in floodplain ecology and native fish restoration, will speak at the series on Friday, March 10, 12:00 noon, in Wellman Hall, Room 119.

Eric Larsen
Landscape Architecture Program
(530) 752-8336
[email protected]

 

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Genomics for Agriculture; March 15–16, 2006

 

The Plant Genomics Program (http://indica.ucdavis.edu/PGP/) is holding a symposium in honor of the late professor Charlie Rick on March 15–16, 2006, titled "Genomics for Agriculture." The keynote speaker is Christopher Somerville, professor at Carnegie Institution of Washington and the Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University.

The symposium is free for all UC Davis attendees, but registration ensures a seat. Registration also counts as your lunch ticket on March 16. Program and registration information are at: http://indica.ucdavis.edu/PGP/index.php?nav=events&link=rick.

Victoria Whitworth
(530) 754-2252
[email protected]

 

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Terroir 2006; March 19–22, 2006

 

The Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science is sponsoring an international conference, Terroir 2006, in March. The conference is for researchers, grape growers, and winemakers who have an interest in terroir, the influence of the natural environment on the growing of grapes and the production of wine.

The conference includes presentations from internationally recognized scholars and producers, and pre- and post-conference field trips. For a full program schedule, visit the Terroir page, http://terroir.ucdavis.edu/index.htm, at the RMI Web site.

Claudette Oriol
CA&ES Dean’s Office
(530) 752-2120
[email protected]

 

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Water Resources Coordinating Conference; April 25–26, 2006

 

The first UC ANR Water Resources Coordinating Conference will be held at the Red Lion Hotel in Sacramento on April 25–26. The purpose of the conference is to provide a "big picture" view of water issues facing California and discuss how the University of California fits into that picture.

The conference is for all ANR colleagues interested in water issues. Limited travel support will be available to ANR faculty, specialists, and advisors. Details regarding the program, registration, and hotel information will be posted on the UC Center for Water Resources Web site (www.waterresources.ucr.edu) as they become available.

Christine French [email protected]

 

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Visit CA&ES Currents online at http://caes.ucdavis.edu/NewsEvents/currents.

CA&ES Currents, the faculty/staff newsletter of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at UC Davis, is published on the first and third Thursday of each month (in July and August, only on the first Thursday.)

News deadline is noon Monday preceding Thursday publication. Send news items to editor, [email protected].

Issue Editor:
Ann Filmer
(530) 754-6788
[email protected]

Contributors: Ann Filmer, Thomas Kaiser, Rhoda McKnight, Neal Van Alfen, John Weston.

Some Web links cited in this newsletter may be inaccessible to off-campus sites. If you want to view the full stories on the Web from off campus, you will need to provide a username and password the first time you try to view a story: username: clips password: newz

To be added to or deleted from this electronic newsletter list, please write to [email protected].

The University of California does not discriminate in any of its policies, procedures or practices. The university is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer.

 

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