CA&ES Currents Newsletter  icon newspaper

March 02, 2006

May 29, 2014 admin


Message from the Dean
A Message from Dean Neal Van Alfen: ANR Programs

Who
Jorge Dubcovsky: $5 Million USDA Grant, Wheat Genome Research
Pamela Tom: Institute of Food Technologists Award
Lisa Reimer, Rajeev Vaidyanathan: William C. Reeves Awards
Stephen Vosti: International Award for Rain-Forest Research

In The News
Faculty-Student E-mail Boundaries

What
ANR Workgroup and Coordinating Conference Proposals
The Natural History of the Bible; March 9, 2006
Ergonomics Training
Arboretum Events
Academic and Strategic Planning Committee Minutes

When
Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Field Day; March 3–4, 2006
Health and Safety in Large Dairies; March 6, 2006
Growing Minds: One Seed at a Time; March 7, 2006
Common Threads; March 9, 2006
Ted Sommer: Sacramento River, River of Life; March 10, 2006
Working Together to Sustain Farmers, Farmland, and Food Security; March 14, 2006
Plant Genomics Symposium; March 15–16, 2006
Terroir 2006; March 19–22, 2006
Creating a Culture of Safety; April 3, 2006
Water Resources Coordinating Conference; April 26–27, 2006
Postharvest Technology Short Course, June 19–30, 2006


A Message from Dean Neal Van Alfen: ANR Programs
A collaborative effort between the UC Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources (ANR) and the three UC campuses with ANR programs (UC Davis, UC Riverside, and UC Berkeley) is laying the foundation for an initiative that will provide supplemental funding for ANR systemwide and campus programs that were significantly cut during the state’s recent budget crisis.

To be successful, this initiative must have the support of our stakeholders, so meetings were held with them during the past few months to assess their support. A key question in the minds of many stakeholders is whether or not the ANR programs are a priority within the University of California.

At UC Davis we are very fortunate that Chancellor Vanderhoef is a strong supporter and advocate for the land-grant mission of the university. Last week he showed his support by spending two days in CA&ES stakeholder meetings in the lower San Joaquin Valley.

This type of personal support by the chancellor sends a strong positive message to our stakeholders regarding the value of UC’s land-grant programs to UC Davis. Thank you Chancellor Vanderhoef.

As always, I value your feedback. If you have questions or comments, please e-mail me.

Neal K. Van Alfen
Dean
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
[email protected]

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Jorge Dubcovsky: $5 Million USDA Grant, Wheat Genome Research
A national consortium of wheat breeders and scientists, led by Jorge Dubcovsky, a professor in the Department of Plant Sciences, was awarded a $5 million grant by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to implement technologies that will equip breeders to produce higher quality, disease-resistant wheat, one of the worlds most widely used food crops.

The technology, known as marker-assisted selection, allows the researchers to use the genetic information found in plant DNA to select those plants that carry desirable traits, such as disease resistance and improved quality.

Wheat is unique among the major crop plants, Dubcovsky noted, in that researchers from public universities and government laboratories, rather than private companies, are largely responsible for providing new varieties to U.S. wheat farmers.

"The main objective of the Marker-Assisted Selection Project is to incorporate modern selection technologies to increase the competitiveness of these public wheat breeding programs," Dubcovsky said. Dubcovsky is project leader for the program which includes breeders and researchers at universities in 17 states and at four USDA laboratories.

For a full press release, see http://www.news.ucdavis.edu/search/news_detail.lasso?id=7629.

Jorge Dubcovsky
Plant Sciences
(530) 752-5159
[email protected]

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Pamela Tom: Institute of Food Technologists Award
Pam Tom, manager of the Seafood Extension Program, is this year's recipient of the Calvert L. Willey Distinguished Service Award from the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT). The award honors an individual who has provided continuing, meritorious, and imaginative service to IFT. The award was first presented to Calvert Willey, then executive director of IFT, in 1987 and initiated on the 50th anniversary of IFT in 1989. IFT is a nonprofit scientific society working in food science, food technology, and related professions in industry, academia, and government. IFT publishes “Food Technology” and the “Journal of Food Science,” and conducts the annual IFT Food Expo.

Pamela Tom
Food Science and Technology
(530) 752-3837
[email protected]

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Lisa Reimer, Rajeev Vaidyanathan: William C. Reeves Awards
Lisa Reimer, a doctoral student in medical entomologist Greg Lanzaro’s vector genetics lab, is the winner of the 2006 William C. Reeves New Investigator Award, sponsored by the Mosquito and Vector Control Association of California (MVCAC) and coordinated by the UC Mosquito Research Program. Reimer’s research is on insecticide resistance in an African malaria mosquito.

Reimer taught science in the Peace Corps from 2000 to 2002 in a village in The Gambia, West Africa, where malaria is common. While in The Gambia, Reimer also volunteered as a laboratory and field specialist for the Medical Research Council.

Winning second place in the competition was Rajeev Vaidyanathan, a postdoctoral researcher in the lab of medical entomologist Thomas Scott. His work is on mosquito vector competence for West Nile virus. Vaidyanathan obtained his doctoral degree in parasitology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Hadassah Medical School, Israel.

The Reeves New Investigator Award memorializes world-renowned medical entomologist William Reeves of the School of Public Health, UC Berkeley. It is awarded to the best scientific paper submitted and presented at the annual MVCAC conference.

Lisa Reimer
Entomology
[email protected]

Rajeev Vaidyanathan
Entomology
[email protected]

 

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Stephen Vosti: International Award for Rain-Forest Research

 

Steve Vosti, an adjunct professor in agricultural and resource economics, and his collaborators received an international award for their efforts to save tropical rain forests and reduce poverty by addressing the economic and social needs of rain-forest farmers. The Science Award for Outstanding Partnership 2005, given by the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research, went to the Alternatives to Slash-and-Burn Program for developing more environment-friendly farming and forest-management techniques, and slowing deforestation.

The alternatives program, headquartered at the Kenya-based World Agroforestry Centre, is a global partnership of more than 80 institutions conducting research in 12 tropical forest biomes. Its efforts are directed toward curbing deforestation and reducing poverty among those living near or within tropical moist forests.

Vosti prepared several chapters for and co-edited a book on the program's first decade of research, "Slash-and-Burn Agriculture: The Search for Alternatives," which details the causes and consequences of the annual destruction of 80,000 square miles of rain forest, while providing options for reducing forest loss.

Stephen Vosti
Agricultural and Resource Economics
(530) 754-6731
[email protected]

 

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Faculty-Student E-mail Boundaries

 

An article in the New York Times, “To: [email protected] Subject: Why It's All About Me,” addressed student e-mail messages to faculty at different universities. According to the article, “at colleges and universities nationwide, e-mail has made professors much more approachable. But many say it has made them too accessible, erasing boundaries that traditionally kept students at a healthy distance. These days, they say, students seem to view them as available around the clock, sending a steady stream of e-mail messages -- from 10 a week to 10 after every class -- that are too informal or downright inappropriate.”

Topics addressed in the article include e-mail as a teaching and communication tool, faculty expertise being viewed by some students as a service industry, and faculty concerns about student evaluations.

New York Times
http://www.news.ucdavis.edu/in_the_news/full_text/view_clip.lasso?id=14243

 

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ANR Workgroup and Coordinating Conference Proposals

 

The Office of the Associate Vice President issued the FY 2006–2007 Call for Workgroup and Coordinating Conference Reports and Funding Requests. Proposals must be submitted from March 1 through May 1, 2006, in ANR's NEWCOW Web site at http://ucanr.org/newcow/. Program leaders and peer review panels will review proposals, including:

  • Reports from currently funded workgroups, coordinating conferences, and formative workgroups
  • Operational funds from current ANR workgroups and coordinating conferences
  • Ratification of workgroups currently meeting or funded, but not ratified
  • Re-ratification of workgroups first ratified in 2001
  • Coordinating conferences receiving workgroup funds in FY 2005–2006
  • Formation of new workgroups

For more information about ANR workgroups and coordinating conferences, or to access the full call, go to the ANR Web site at http://ucanr.org/internal/miscshow.cfm?unit=5320&misctype=Main_page.

Richard Standiford
Agriculture and Natural Resources
(510) 987-0026
[email protected]

 

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The Natural History of the Bible; March 9, 2006

 

Daniel Hillel, professor emeritus of environmental studies, University of Massachusetts, and senior research scientist, Center for Climate Systems Research, Columbia University, will speak on “The Natural History of the Bible” on Thursday, March 9, at 3:00 p.m. in the Garrison Room, Memorial Union. Hillel is the author or editor of more than 20 books, including “Out of the Earth: Civilization and the Life of the Soil” and “Rivers of Eden: The Struggle for Water and the Quest for Peace in the Middle East.”

Hillel’s book, “The Natural History of the Bible: An Environmental Exploration of the Hebrew Scriptures,” will be available to purchase and Hillel will autograph copies after the seminar. The seminar is cosponsored by three departments and two graduate groups.

Stephanie Glitsch-Wu
Land, Air and Water Resources
(530) 752-1130
[email protected]

 

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Ergonomics Training

 

Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) invites supervisors and others to attend the Ergonomic Awareness and Computer Workstation Evaluation courses offered through Staff Development & Professional Services. Supervisors have the responsibility for knowing many facets of environmental and physical safety. Supervisors must provide initial ergonomic evaluations to staff as defined in UCD P&P 290-16 ("Campus Ergonomics Program") and Clerical Unit Supervisors Responsibilities.

 

The two EH&S certificate series courses were designed to provide a fundamental knowledge of ergonomics, including the techniques to successfully complete an initial (Tier I) ergonomic evaluation. Be sure to enroll in both courses -- Ergonomic Awareness (HL0239) and Computer Workstation Evaluation (HL0241) -- to complete the evaluator training module.

There are several spots still available in the March 16, 2006, Ergonomic Awareness and Computer Workstation Evaluation courses.

Craig Carrero
Ergonomic Program Coordinator
Environmental Health and Safety
(530) 752-9715
[email protected]

 

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Arboretum Events

 

The guided tours listed below are free and open to the public unless indicated otherwise. For more information, visit the arboretum Web site: http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu.

“The World of the Coast Redwood,” Saturday, March 4, 11 a.m., Buehler Alumni and Visitors Center
Docent Bev Watros will lead a tour and provide an introduction to the ecology and history of the coast redwood, the most common animals and plants associated with redwoods, and the small trees and other plants that grow high up in redwood canopies.

“Walk with Warren,” Wednesday, March 8, 12 noon, Arboretum Gazebo
Join arboretum superintendent Warren Roberts for a lunchtime stroll in the arboretum. Enjoy the early spring flowers, learn about the arboretum’s collections, and get a little exercise.

“Growing Healthy Plants,” Sunday, March 12, 2 p.m., Arboretum Gazebo
During this tour, learn about the type of soil, drainage, water, and care needed to grow healthy plants. Docent Pat Murray will discuss basic gardening strategies and point out outstanding plants for this area.

San Francisco Flower & Garden Show, Wednesday, March 15, 7:45 a.m.–5:00 p.m.; $55/$45 members, includes transportation and admission
Join the Friends of the UC Davis Arboretum for a day trip to the San Francisco Flower & Garden Show. This year’s theme is “Where Gardens Meet Art.” Explore six flower-covered acres that include hundreds of exhibits, free educational seminars, and a breathtaking array of gardens. Advance registration is required; call (530) 752-4880 or visit www.arboretum.ucdavis.edu.

“California Native Plants for the Garden,” Lecture and Book Signing, Friday, March 17, 7 p.m.
Carol Bornstein, Director of Living Collections at the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden, will discuss her new book, “California Native Plants for the Garden,” at a free public lecture at the Veterans’ Memorial Center, 14th and B Streets, Davis. This beautiful reference book describes the best California species for gardens and provides detailed advice on their cultivation, from landscape design and installation to watering, pruning, and pest control.

Friends of the UC Davis Arboretum Spring Plant Sale & Social, Saturday, March 18, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., Arboretum Nursery at Orchard Park
The event is for members only, but anyone may join at the door, and all new members will receive a free plant and a 10 percent member discount on their purchases. Enjoy live music, refreshments, and children’s activities. Expert garden advice is available.

“March in the White Flower Garden,” Sunday, March 19, 2 p.m., Arboretum Gazebo
The White Flower Garden in the arboretum, featuring hundreds of flowering shrubs, perennials, and groundcovers, is designed for fragrance, sound, and texture, as well as for visual beauty. See examples of great plants for Central Valley gardens in a tour led by docent Don Christiansen.

“An Evening with Michael Glassman,” Thursday, March 23, 7 p.m., Teen Center, 3rd and B Streets, Davis; $10 members/$15 with advance registration/$20 at the door
Noted landscape designer Michael Glassman will discuss his work, show pictures, and give ideas on how to incorporate design principles into your own landscape at a program sponsored by Friends of the UC Davis Arboretum and the Association of Professional Landscape Designers. To register, contact Colleen Hamilton (916-961-0191; [email protected]) or Katrina Fairchild (530-305-4337).

“California Native Plants in Bloom,” Saturday, March 25, 11 a.m., Buehler Alumni and Visitors Center
California has more than 5,000 native plant species. Many of these plants respond to our cool, wet winters with spectacular spring blooms. Three standouts in the spring native plant garden – redbuds, dogwoods, and California wild lilacs – will be the focus of this tour, led by docent Dean Wheeler.

“Behind-the-Scenes Tour of the Heron Colony at Shields Oak Grove,” Sunday, March 26, 2 p.m., Arboretum Gazebo
Over the past several years, the Shields Oak Grove in the arboretum has become home to a large colony of herons and egrets. Horticultural curator Emily Griswold of the arboretum and wildlife biologists from the UC Davis Museum of Wildlife and Fish Biology will lead a special tour of the oak grove. Visitors will see the herons and egrets returning to the oak grove and learn about their habits, their effects on the trees, and the arboretum’s efforts to enhance wildlife habitat.

 

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Academic and Strategic Planning Committee Minutes

 

New minutes have been added to the Web site for the college’s Academic and Strategic Planning Committee: http://caes.ucdavis.edu/FacStaff/ASPC/Default.htm.

Susan Harrison
Environmental Science and Policy
(530) 752-7110
[email protected]

 

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Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Field Day; March 3–4, 2006

 

The California Association of FFA and 4-H high-school students from California and surrounding states will gather on campus for the annual Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Field Day. The students will compete in 27 contests ranging from livestock judging to agriculture computer applications. The contests are coordinated by UC Davis students, with campus faculty and staff members serving as contest advisers. More information about the event is available at http://caes.ucdavis.edu/Events/FieldDay.htm.

Stacie Hewitt
CA&ES Dean’s Office
(530) 754-9083
[email protected]

 

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Health and Safety in Large Dairies; March 6, 2006

 

Frank Mitloehner, specialist in Cooperative Extension in the Department of Animal Science, will present a seminar, “Health and Safety in Large Dairies,” on Monday, March 6, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 3201, Hart Hall.

The seminar is sponsored by the Western Center for Agricultural Health and Safety, the Masters of Public Health Program, the Small Farm Center, and the Center for Environmental Health Sciences. Topics in the seminar series are at http://agcenter.ucdavis.edu/Announce/Documents/WCAHS-Seminars0506.pdf.

Stephen McCurdy
Western Center for Agricultural Health and Safety
(530) 752-8051
[email protected]

 

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Growing Minds: One Seed at a Time; March 7, 2006

 

Ann Marie Kennedy and students from Grant High School in Sacramento will talk about their school’s environmental program in the presentation, “Grant's Environmental Organization: Growing Minds, One Seed at a Time,” on Tuesday, March 7, 4:00 p.m., in Room 101, Bowley Science Center.

Their presentation is part of the “Agriculture, Food, and Community Series,” sponsored by the plant sciences department, SAREP, the Student Farm, and several other organizations. More on the seminar series is at http://www.sarep.ucdavis.edu/news/0601apr.htm.

Mark Van Horn
Plant Sciences
(530) 752-7645
[email protected]

 

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Common Threads; March 9, 2006

 

Six women have been selected as the 2006 honorees for the Common Threads Awards which recognize women from the Sacramento Valley for their agricultural, philanthropic, and community service. The recipients are Trini Campbell, Gail Kautz, Barbara LeVake, Melinda Mendelson, Laura Tower, and Mary-Ann Warmerdam.

The honorees will be recognized at a luncheon on Thursday, March 9, 2006, in the ARC Ballroom on campus. The keynote speaker will be Assemblymember Barbara Matthews, and the mistress of ceremonies will be California Department of Food and Agriculture Deputy Secretary Kim Myrman. The Common Threads luncheon begins at 11:00 a.m. and will feature California wines, a raffle, and the awards presentation. Net proceeds raised from the luncheon go to charities of the honorees’ choice.

For ticket information, contact Claudette Oriol, CA&ES Dean’s Office, (530) 752-2120, [email protected].

 

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Ted Sommer: Sacramento River, River of Life; March 10, 2006

 

The Sacramento River, the largest and most important river in California, provides water to 22 million people and serves the fifth largest economy in the world. The Landscape Architecture Program is offering a weekly seminar series this quarter that addresses pressing issues in river management and restoration.

Ted Sommer, a senior environmental scientist with the California Department of Water Resources and with research interests in floodplain ecology and native fish restoration, will speak at the series on Friday, March 10, 12:00 noon, in Wellman Hall, Room 119.

Eric Larsen
Landscape Architecture Program
(530) 752-8336
[email protected]

 

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Working Together to Sustain Farmers, Farmland, and Food Security; March 14, 2006

 

Annie and Jeff Main, owners of a 20-acre organic family farm, Good Humus Produce, in Capay, will speak on “Communities and Agriculture: Working Together to Sustain Farmers, Farmland, and Food Security,” on Tuesday, March 14, 4:00 p.m., in Room 101, Bowley Science Center.

Their presentation is part of the “Agriculture, Food, and Community Series,” sponsored by the plant sciences department, SAREP, the Student Farm, and several other organizations. More on the seminar series is at http://www.sarep.ucdavis.edu/news/0601apr.htm.

Mark Van Horn
Plant Sciences
(530) 752-7645
[email protected]

 

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Plant Genomics Symposium; March 15–16, 2006

 

The Plant Genomics Program is holding a symposium in honor of the late professor Charley Rick on March 15–16, titled "Plant Genomics Program: Charley Rick Symposium." The keynote speaker is Christopher Somerville, professor at Carnegie Institution of Washington and the Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University.

The symposium is free for all UC Davis attendees, but registration is requested. Registration also counts as your lunch ticket on March 16. Program and registration information are at a new Web site: http://conferences.ucdavis.edu/charliericksymposium.

Victoria Whitworth
Plant Genomics Program
(530) 754-2252
[email protected]

 

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Terroir 2006; March 19–22, 2006

 

The Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science is hosting an international conference, Terroir 2006, on March 19–22. The conference is for researchers, grape growers, and winemakers who have an interest in terroir, the influence of the natural environment on the growing of grapes and the production of wine.

The conference includes presentations from more than 30 internationally recognized scholars and producers, meals, and several pre- and post-conference field trips. For a full program schedule, visit the Terroir page, http://terroir.ucdavis.edu, at the RMI Web site. The enrollment deadline is March 10.

Claudette Oriol
CA&ES Dean’s Office
(530) 752-2120
[email protected]

 

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Creating a Culture of Safety; April 3, 2006

 

Beverlie Milone, health and safety manager for Fetzer Vineyards, will present a seminar, “Creating a Culture of Safety,” on Monday, April 3, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 3201, Hart Hall.

The seminar is sponsored by the Western Center for Agricultural Health and Safety, the Masters of Public Health Program, the Small Farm Center, and the Center for Environmental Health Sciences. Topics in the seminar series are at http://agcenter.ucdavis.edu/Announce/Documents/WCAHS-Seminars0506.pdf.

Stephen McCurdy
Western Center for Agricultural Health and Safety
(530) 752-8051
[email protected]

 

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Water Resources Coordinating Conference; April 26–27, 2006

 

The first UC ANR Water Resources Coordinating Conference will be held at the Heidrick Ag History Center in Woodland on April 26–27. The purpose of the conference is to provide a "big picture" view of water issues facing California and discuss how the University of California fits into that picture.

The conference is for all ANR colleagues interested in water issues. Limited travel support will be available to ANR faculty, specialists, and advisors. Details regarding the program, registration, and hotel information will be posted on the UC Center for Water Resources Web site (www.waterresources.ucr.edu) as they become available.

Christine French
Center for Water Resources
UC Riverside
[email protected]

 

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Postharvest Technology Short Course, June 19–30, 2006

 

Celebrating its 28th annual presentation, the Postharvest Technology Short Course is a two-week intensive study of current technological procedures used for handling fruits, nuts, vegetables, and ornamentals in California. It is designed for research and extension workers, quality control personnel, and other professionals interested in current advances in the postharvest technology of horticultural crops.

The first week is spent on intensive lectures and discussions on campus, followed by a second week field tour covering packinghouses, cooling and storage facilities, produce distribution centers, field harvest, packing, and transportation facilities in California.

Enrollment for this popular program is on a first-paid, first-enrolled basis. For more information, see http://postharvest.ucdavis.edu/announce/shortcourse.shtml.

Adel Kader
Plant Sciences
(530) 752-0909
[email protected]

 

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Visit CA&ES Currents online at http://caes.ucdavis.edu/NewsEvents/currents.

CA&ES Currents, the faculty/staff newsletter of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at UC Davis, is published on the first and third Thursday of each month (in July and August, only on the first Thursday.)

News deadline is noon Monday preceding Thursday publication. Send news items to editor, [email protected].

Issue Editor:
Ann Filmer
(530) 754-6788
[email protected]

Contributors: Ann Filmer, Thomas Kaiser, Rhoda McKnight, Neal Van Alfen, John Weston.

Some Web links cited in this newsletter may be inaccessible to off-campus sites. If you want to view the full stories on the Web from off campus, you will need to provide a username and password the first time you try to view a story: username: clips password: newz

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The University of California does not discriminate in any of its policies, procedures or practices. The university is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer.

 

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