CA&ES Currents Newsletter  icon newspaper

March 16, 2006

May 29, 2014 admin


Message from the Dean
A Message from Dean Neal Van Alfen: California Center for Urban Horticulture

Who
Lanzaro, Cornel, Luckhart: Malaria in Mali

In The News
Mosquitoes Arriving Early This Year
Which Raisin Do You Prefer?
Farmworkers Often Go Hungry

What
Universitywide Assembly of the Academic Senate: Nominations
CA&ES Executive Committee Election
Water Resources Coordinating Conference: Poster Submissions
Faculty Workshop: Teaching with Writing
Undergraduate Instructional Improvement Program
IPM Innovator Awards
ANR Workgroup and Coordinating Conference Proposals
Arboretum Events

When
Terroir 2006; March 19–22, 2006
Creating a Culture of Safety; April 3, 2006
Rice Production Workshop; April 3, 2006
GPS & GIS Short Course; April 11, 2006
Water Resources Coordinating Conference; April 26–27, 2006
Youth in Development in the 21st Century; May 4–5, 2006
Small Grains and Alfalfa Field Day; May 9, 2006
Management of Fruit Ripening Workshop; May 12, 2006
Postharvest Technology Short Course, June 19–30, 2006


A Message from Dean Neal Van Alfen: California Center for Urban Horticulture
For the past few years college faculty, the UC Davis Arboretum, representatives from ANR, and external stakeholders have been working together to explore how we can better serve the horticultural and landscape planning needs of urban citizens of California.

Heiner Leith, former chair of the Department of Environmental Horticulture, chaired a committee that initially explored the concept. An implementation committee was then formed, with co-chairs Loren Oki, a faculty member of the departments of Environmental Design and Plant Sciences, Kathleen Socolofsky, director of the UC Davis Arboretum, and Gary Hudson, a member of the Dean’s Advisory Council and an international leader in the horticulture industry.

The implementation committee recently presented a plan for the establishment of the California Center for Urban Horticulture. The plan was developed after extensive consultations with interested parties, both internal to the university and externally with diverse stakeholders.

My office is very supportive of the concept of this center since it will help our college establish important connections to the urban citizens of our state. We are working with the implementation committee to make the California Center for Urban Horticulture a reality. As always, I value your feedback. If you have questions or comments, please e-mail me.

Neal K. Van Alfen
Dean
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
[email protected]

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Lanzaro, Cornel, Luckhart: Malaria in Mali
Medical entomologist Gregory Lanzaro, director of the UC Mosquito Research Program and director of the Center for Vectorborne Diseases, received a $650,000 training grant from the Fogarty International Center, as part of the National Institutes of Health's Global Infectious Disease Research Training Program.

"Mosquito control is currently the most effective measure to reduce malaria transmission," said Lanzaro, who is partnering with Anthony Cornel of the Mosquito Control Research Laboratory at the Kearney Agricultural Center, and Shirley Luckhart, professor of medical microbiology and immunology in the School of Medicine. Additional information is available at http://www.ucmrp.ucdavis.edu/.

Gregory Lanzaro
(530) 752-5652
[email protected]

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Mosquitoes Arriving Early This Year
Standing water from winter storms, warmer temperatures, and longer daylight hours mean that mosquito season, and with it the West Nile virus (WNV), is arriving earlier this year. Culex mosquitoes, the principal carriers or vectors of WNV, are usually the most active in California from April through October but the unseasonable springlike weather awakens them like an alarm clock from their winter semi-hibernation, according to Greg Lanzaro, director of the UC Mosquito Research Program and director of the Center for Vectorborne Diseases.

“The mosquitoes that were infected with WNV before they went into their semi-hibernation or diapause, still have the virus. They’re loaded and ready to go,” said Lanzaro. The disease, transmitted by the bite of an infected mosquito, last year killed 18 people in California and infected more than 900 others throughout the state. Health officials found WNV in all 58 counties.

Last year’s WNV outbreak in California was not an isolated case, said Robert Washino, chair of the Department of Entomology and a 32-year member of the Sacramento-Yolo Mosquito Vector Control District Board. “It’s a preview of what’s to come unless we take proactive actions. This year we’re heading for a very high mosquito population.”

For a full press release with mitigation and control measures, visit the Mosquito Research Program’s Web site, www.ucmrp.ucdavis.edu, and look under the “News” section.

Kathy Keatley Garvey
UC Statewide Mosquito Research Program
(530) 754-6894
[email protected]

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Which Raisin Do You Prefer?
Hildegarde Heymann, a professor in the Department of Viticulture and Enology, says that a panel of taste testers that she trained found "fairly pronounced" differences in the flavors of different raisin varieties that were dried using different methods.

According to the Fresno Bee, “the study could, in time, give those in the raisin industry another marketing tool, making specific appeals to consumers based on taste preferences. It's not likely a lot of the wine-tasting glossary of terms will be applied to raisins. But if the study is any indication, there are detectable differences in how dried grapes taste.”

The Fresno Bee
http://www.news.ucdavis.edu/in_the_news/full_text/view_clip.lasso?id=14357

Hildegarde Heymann
(530) 754-4816
[email protected]

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Farmworkers Often Go Hungry
Cathy Wirth, an international agricultural development graduate student, found that in winter only 27 percent of farmworkers surveyed could bring home produce from the fields at the end of their work day, and that farmworkers had difficulty finding transportation to and from grocery stores.

A survey conducted by the California Institute for Rural Studies found that many farmworkers in Fresno County have to choose between buying food and paying rent, according to an article in the Fresno Bee. Furthermore, access to fresh fruits and vegetables is a problem for many farmworkers.

A farmworker food task force is working with the rural institute to develop recommendations for improving access to food.

The Fresno Bee
http://www.news.ucdavis.edu/in_the_news/full_text/view_clip.lasso?id=14408

Catherine Wirth
[email protected]

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Universitywide Assembly of the Academic Senate: Nominations
An election for three Davis Divisional Representatives to the Universitywide Assembly of the Academic Senate will be held. Representatives will be elected for two-year terms, serving from September 1, 2006, through August 31, 2008. Nominations must be received in the Academic Senate Office (303 Voorhies Hall) no later than Monday, March 27, 2006.

Each nomination must be in writing and must contain a statement that the nominee will accept the nomination. A brief biography (120 words or less) must also be included. All nomination forms must be submitted with the original signature of five Davis Division members.

The nomination form is available on the Web site:
http://academicsenate.ucdavis.edu/pdf/divisional_rep_nomination_form.pdf or in the senate office.

The full rules of procedure may be found in Davis Division Bylaws 14 and 16:
http://academicsenate.ucdavis.edu/documents.cfm.

Susan Kauzlarich
Davis Division of the Academic Senate
(530) 752-4756
[email protected]

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CA&ES Executive Committee Election
Both Academic Senate –AND– Academic Federation representation is needed for the Division of Agricultural Sciences on the CA&ES Executive Committee. The Web site for the committee is http://caes.ucdavis.edu/FacStaff/ExcCom.htm.

The nomination deadline is March 29, 2006. Ballots will then be mailed to Academic Senate and Academic Federation members on April 7, and ballots must be received by April 27, 2006.

Carry-over Members
Academic Federation (non-Senate): Steve Kaffka, Rick Snyder, Frank Zalom
Academic Senate: Douglas Conklin, Ken Giles, Greg Pasternack, Richard Plant, Peg Rucker, Mark Schwartz, Dina St. Clair

For copies of the election notice and nomination forms, contact:

Sharon Berg
(530) 752-3483
[email protected]

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Water Resources Coordinating Conference: Poster Submissions
The UC ANR Water Resource Coordinating Conference (WRCC) and Surface Water Quality Workshop will be held in Woodland, April 26–27 (more details below, in the “When” section). A poster session will be held at the conference on the evening of April 26. You are invited to present a poster on any of the conference topics: Statewide water issues, TMDLs, Irrigated lands and agricultural discharge waivers, Pesticide runoff and mitigation, Nutrient runoff and mitigation, and Pathogen runoff and mitigation.

Please submit the title of your poster to Rachael Long ([email protected]) by March 31, 2006.

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Faculty Workshop: Teaching with Writing
The Teaching Resources Center and the University Writing Program are cosponsoring a full-day Writing in the Disciplines faculty workshop from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on March 28, 2006, in MU II, Memorial Union.

Designed for faculty who include substantial writing in their courses, the workshop will provide practical ways to integrate writing into courses, advance students' analytic skills, teach students to write better, and respond to student work more effectively and efficiently. Presenters will discuss techniques useful for both small discussion sections and large lecture courses.

Online registration is at http://trc.ucdavis.edu/trc/events/writing/index.htm.
Mardena Creek
(530) 754-9542
[email protected]

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Undergraduate Instructional Improvement Program
The Undergraduate Instructional Improvement Grant Program is the primary source of on-campus funding for undergraduate curricular renewal and pedagogical innovation. Each year, areas of emphasis are identified on the basis of campus needs.

This year's areas of emphasis include: 1) analytic and writing skills, 2) oral communication skills, 3) internationalization of the curriculum, 4) course, curriculum, and program revision focusing on enhancing the quality of faculty-student interactions and/or increasing experiential, discovery learning in traditional lecture courses, 5) instructional technology, and 6) social-cultural diversity.

The Spring quarter deadline to submit proposals is Friday, April 21, 2006. For complete information, go to http://trc.ucdavis.edu/trc/grants/faculty/uiip.html.

Fred Wood
(530) 752-6068
[email protected]

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IPM Innovator Awards
The California Department of Pesticide Regulation has given out 100 IPM Innovator awards to honor California organizations that emphasize pest prevention, favor least-hazardous pest management, and share their successful strategies with others.

You can nominate a group to win an award by filling out a short form, and then submitting it via mail, fax, or the Internet. The nomination deadline is March 31, 2006. More information may be found at http://www.cdpr.ca.gov/docs/ipminov/innovatr.htm.

Bob Elliot
(916) 324-4156
[email protected]

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ANR Workgroup and Coordinating Conference Proposals
The Office of the Associate Vice President issued the FY 2006–2007 Call for Workgroup and Coordinating Conference Reports and Funding Requests. Proposals must be submitted from March 1 through May 1, 2006, in ANR's NEWCOW Web site at http://ucanr.org/newcow/. Program leaders and peer review panels will review proposals, including:

  • Reports from currently funded workgroups, coordinating conferences, and formative workgroups
  • Operational funds from current ANR workgroups and coordinating conferences
  • Ratification of workgroups currently meeting or funded, but not ratified
  • Re-ratification of workgroups first ratified in 2001
  • Coordinating conferences receiving workgroup funds in FY 2005–2006
  • Formation of new workgroups

 

For more information about ANR workgroups and coordinating conferences, or to access the full call, go to the ANR Web site at http://ucanr.org/internal/miscshow.cfm?unit=5320&misctype=Main_page

.

 

Richard Standiford

Agriculture and Natural Resources

(510) 987-0026

[email protected]

 

 

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Arboretum Events

 

The guided tours listed below are free and open to the public unless indicated otherwise. For more information, visit the arboretum Web site: http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu.

“California Native Plants for the Garden,” Lecture and Book Signing, Friday, March 17, 7 p.m. Carol Bornstein, Director of Living Collections at the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden, will discuss her new book, California Native Plants for the Garden, at a free public lecture at the Veterans’ Memorial Center, 14th and B Streets, Davis. This beautiful reference book describes the best California species for gardens and provides detailed advice on their cultivation, from landscape design and installation to watering, pruning, and pest control.

Spring Plant Sale & Social, Saturday, March 18, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., Arboretum Nursery at Orchard Park The event is for members of the Friends of the UC Davis Arboretum, but anyone may join at the door, and all new members receive a free plant and a 10 percent member discount on their purchases. Enjoy live music, refreshments, and children’s activities. Expert garden advice is available.

“March in the White Flower Garden,” Sunday, March 19, 2 p.m., Arboretum Gazebo The White Flower Garden in the arboretum, featuring hundreds of flowering shrubs, perennials, and groundcovers, is designed for fragrance, sound, and texture, as well as for visual beauty. See examples of great plants for Central Valley gardens in a tour led by docent Don Christiansen.

“An Evening with Michael Glassman,” Thursday, March 23, 7 p.m., Teen Center, 3rd and B Streets, Davis; $10 members/$15 with advance registration/$20 at the door Noted landscape designer Michael Glassman will discuss his work, show pictures, and give ideas on how to incorporate design principles into your own landscape at a program sponsored by the Friends of the UC Davis Arboretum and the Association of Professional Landscape Designers. To register, contact Colleen Hamilton (916-961-0191; [email protected]) or Katrina Fairchild (530-305-4337).

“California Native Plants in Bloom,” Saturday, March 25, 11 a.m., Buehler Alumni and Visitors Center California has more than 5,000 native plant species. Many of these plants respond to our cool, wet winters with spectacular spring blooms. Three standouts in the spring native plant garden – redbuds, dogwoods, and California wild lilacs – will be the focus of this tour, led by docent Dean Wheeler.

“Behind-the-Scenes Tour of the Heron Colony at Shields Oak Grove,” Sunday, March 26, 2 p.m., Arboretum Gazebo Over the past several years, the Shields Oak Grove in the arboretum has become home to a large colony of herons and egrets. Horticultural curator Emily Griswold of the arboretum and wildlife biologists from the UC Davis Museum of Wildlife and Fisheries Biology will lead a special tour of the oak grove. Visitors will see the herons and egrets returning to the oak grove and learn about their habits, their effects on the trees, and the arboretum’s efforts to enhance wildlife habitat.

“Bike to the Wild Flowers,” Saturday, April 1, 11 a.m., Buehler Alumni and Visitors Center Visit the arboretum for a bike tour of wildflowers in bloom, led by docent Lois Richter. Bring your bike and enjoy a leisurely ride as you learn about some of the plants that grow wild along country roads in the Sacramento Valley. Native wildflowers like poppies and lupines, and plants introduced from other areas like wild mustard, should be in full bloom.

“Spring Care for Flowering Roses,” Saturday, April 8, 11 a.m., Gazebo Growing roses in the Central Valley doesn’t have to require lots of time or chemical sprays. Arboretum docent Pam Kazmierczak will show roses chosen to thrive in our climate and discuss how to get your roses to produce gorgeous blooms during a public tour of the rose collection at the arboretum.

Spring Plant Sale, Saturday, April 8, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Orchard Park Nursery (Orchard Rd. at LaRue Rd.) Enhance your garden with beautiful spring plants from the Friends of the UC Davis Arboretum plant sale. The sale will feature hundreds of different plants that have been grown in Davis and will thrive in Central Valley conditions, including newly-introduced and unusual garden plants that are hard to find or not available in commercial nurseries. Members of the Friends of the UC Davis Arboretum receive a 10% discount, and anyone may join at the sale. Free parking in Visitor Lot 35.

 

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Terroir 2006; March 19–22, 2006

 

The Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science is hosting an international conference, Terroir 2006, on March 19–22. The conference is for researchers, grape growers, and winemakers who have an interest in terroir, the influence of the natural environment on the growing of grapes and the production of wine.

The conference includes presentations from more than 30 internationally recognized scholars and producers, meals, and several pre- and post-conference field trips. For a full program schedule, visit the Terroir page, http://terroir.ucdavis.edu, at the RMI Web site.

Claudette Oriol
CA&ES Dean’s Office
(530) 752-2120
[email protected]

 

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Creating a Culture of Safety; April 3, 2006

 

Beverlie Milone, health and safety manager for Fetzer Vineyards, will present a seminar, “Creating a Culture of Safety,” on Monday, April 3, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 3201, Hart Hall.

The seminar is sponsored by the Western Center for Agricultural Health and Safety, the Masters of Public Health Program, the Small Farm Center, and the Center for Environmental Health Sciences. Topics in the seminar series are at http://agcenter.ucdavis.edu/Announce/Documents/WCAHS-Seminars0506.pdf.

Stephen McCurdy
Western Center for Agricultural Health and Safety
(530) 752-8051
[email protected]

 

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Rice Production Workshop; April 3, 2006

 

UCCE is offering a Rice Production Workshop in Yuba City on April 3, 2006. This in-depth workshop, including speakers who will cover the principles and practices of rice production with new information on several important topics, is designed to help California rice producers maintain their competitive edge. To view the agenda and register, go to http://ucce.ucdavis.edu/calendar/eventdisplay.cfm?caleventnum=13809.

Janice Corner
Department of Plant Sciences
(530) 752-7091
[email protected]

 

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GPS & GIS Short Course; April 11, 2006

 

This free GPS & GIS short course, on the Berkeley campus, is designed for UC Cooperative Extension personnel; some travel and lodging funds are available. The course covers topics such as introduction to global positioning systems and introduction to geographic information systems.

All UCCE colleagues are invited to attend this course on Tuesday, April 11, 2006, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., at the Geospatial Imaging & Informatics Facility, 111 Mulford Hall, on the UC Berkeley campus. Space is limited and registration is mandatory. Please e-mail Karin Tuxen for more information.

Karin Tuxen
(510) 642-8322
[email protected]

 

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Water Resources Coordinating Conference; April 26–27, 2006

 

The first UC ANR Water Resources Coordinating Conference will be held at the Heidrick Ag History Center in Woodland on April 26–27. The purpose of the conference is to provide a "big picture" view of water issues facing California and discuss how the University of California fits into that picture.

The conference is for all ANR colleagues interested in water issues. Limited travel support will be available to ANR faculty, specialists, and advisors. Details regarding the program and registration are at http://lib.berkeley.edu/WRCA/WRC/wrcc06.html.

Christine French
Center for Water Resources
UC Riverside
[email protected]

 

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Youth in Development in the 21st Century; May 4–5, 2006

 

The 4-H Center for Youth Development will host “Youth in Development in the 21st Century” on May 4–5 at the Buehler Alumni and Visitors Center. Panel presentations will address the themes of “Youth and Health,” “Youth and Culture,” and “Youth and Engagement.” Speakers include nationally known researchers and youth development experts Ana Mari Cauce (University of Washington), Shep Zeldin (University of Wisconsin), K.A.S. Wickrama (Iowa State University), and Marc Braverman (Oregon State University; formerly UC Davis). Presenters and moderators include David Campbell, Rand Conger, Richard Enfield, Carole MacNeil, Fe Moncloa, Adrienne Nishina, and Sherri Zidenberg-Cherr from the University of California.

The symposium is open to UC faculty, and UCCE youth development staff and students. May 4 is an all-day event, with the 4-H CYD hosting lunch. May 5 is a morning discussion of the issues raised the prior day, and will be held at Hart Hall, Room 3201. Register for the symposium at http://groups.ucanr.org/Youthdevconf.

Ramona Carlos
4-H Center for Youth Development
(530) 754-8435
[email protected]

 

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Small Grains and Alfalfa Field Day; May 9, 2006

 

The annual UC Davis Small Grains and Alfalfa Field Day (Grain Handlers Field Day), sponsored by the California Crop Improvement Association and the UC Davis Department of Plant Sciences, will held at the UC Davis Agronomy Field Headquarters from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on May 9, 2006.

To view the agenda and register, go to:
http://ucce.ucdavis.edu/calendar/eventdisplay.cfm?caleventnum=13806.

Janice Corner
Department of Plant Sciences
(530) 752-7091
[email protected]

 

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Management of Fruit Ripening Workshop; May 12, 2006

 

The 12th annual Management of Fruit Ripening Workshop will be held on May 12 at the Buehler Alumni and Visitors Center, AGR Room. The program is for shippers and destinations (wholesale and retail) handlers who are involved in ripening fruits and fruit-vegetables. This workshop focuses on how to increase profits by delivering ready-to-eat, delicious fruits and fruit-vegetables to the consumer. Registration for the workshop will begin soon.

Jim Thompson
(530) 752-6167
[email protected]

 

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Postharvest Technology Short Course, June 19–30, 2006

 

Celebrating its 28th annual presentation, the Postharvest Technology Short Course is a two-week intensive study of current technological procedures used for handling fruits, nuts, vegetables, and ornamentals in California. It is designed for research and extension workers, quality control personnel, and other professionals interested in current advances in the postharvest technology of horticultural crops.

The first week is spent on intensive lectures and discussions in the ARC Ballroom on campus, followed by a second week field tour covering packinghouses, cooling and storage facilities, produce distribution centers, field harvest, packing, and transportation facilities in California.

Enrollment for this popular program is on a first-paid, first-enrolled basis. For more information, see http://postharvest.ucdavis.edu/announce/shortcourse.shtml.

Adel Kader
Plant Sciences
(530) 752-0909
[email protected]

 

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Visit CA&ES Currents online at http://caes.ucdavis.edu/NewsEvents/currents.

CA&ES Currents, the faculty/staff newsletter of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at UC Davis, is published on the first and third Thursday of each month (in July and August, only on the first Thursday.)

News deadline is noon Monday preceding Thursday publication. Send news items to editor, [email protected].

Issue Editor:
Ann Filmer
(530) 754-6788
[email protected]

Contributors: Ann Filmer, Thomas Kaiser, Rhoda McKnight, Neal Van Alfen, John Weston.

Some Web links cited in this newsletter may be inaccessible to off-campus sites. If you want to view the full stories on the Web from off campus, you will need to provide a username and password the first time you try to view a story: username: clips password: newz

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The University of California does not discriminate in any of its policies, procedures or practices. The university is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer.

 

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