CA&ES Currents Newsletter  icon newspaper

May 04, 2006

May 29, 2014 admin


Message from the Dean
A Message from Dean Neal Van Alfen: Engagement

Who
Bohart Museum Receives Grant
Robert Page: Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

In The News
Arboretum Balancing Trees, Wildlife Challenges
New Children’s Growth Standards: Kathryn Dewey Research
Bats, Insects Face Rougher-than-normal Spring
Mexican Corn Farmers Face Crisis: Stephen Brush Reports
Picnic Day Parade Winner: Food Science Graduate Students

What
Governor’s Environmental and Economic Leadership Award
5th Annual Food Olympics
A Quarter Abroad in South Africa
UC Seeks Applicants for Information Technology Award
Agricultural Health and Safety Conference
Arboretum Events

When
Growing Up Means Learning How to Walk; May 5, 2006
Latina Teen Pregnancy Prevention and Research; May 9, 2006
Alfalfa and Forages/Small Grains Field Day; May 9, 2006
Automobile Dependency; May 12, 2006
CIFAR Conference XXII; May 15–16, 2006
Garden Based Education; May 16, 2006
Management of Fruit Ripening Workshop; May 22, 2006
Foster Youth; May 23, 2006
After School Programs; May 30, 2006
ANR and Conservation Biology Workshop; June 8, 2006


A Message from Dean Neal Van Alfen: Engagement

Our college is known throughout the world for the quality of its scholarship. This reputation has come from the quantity and quality of our scholarly research output through peer-reviewed publications and by the quality of the students that we train.

One of our challenges, however, is that those whom we rely on the most for support, our local stakeholders, often know much less about our quality than do international leaders. One of the goals of my office has been to seek ways to better engage our stakeholders in the activities of our college, and thus help them gain firsthand knowledge of our programs.

We see the development of a number of centers and institutes in the college as a means to achieve this engagement. A small but successful way that we have been able to engage leaders of important stakeholder groups in our activities has been to ask them to help us plan and choose the leaders of our centers and institutes. We have conducted two searches for directors of institutes in which stakeholder advisory groups have played important roles. In each of these searches the advisory committee members participated in the screening of candidates and in the interviews. Our experience so far has shown that our faculty and stakeholders come to very similar rankings of candidates.

We are learning that engagement of our stakeholders in helping us develop and shape our programs is one of the most effective ways for us to become better known close to home. As always, I value your feedback. If you have questions or comments, please e-mail me.

Neal K. Van Alfen
Dean
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
[email protected]

 

Back to top ^

 

 

Bohart Museum Receives Grant

 

A new grant to the R.M. Bohart Museum of Entomology will enable teachers and students to study insects such as Madagascar hissing cockroaches, Vietnamese walking sticks, blue death feigning beetles, and Chilean rose-haired tarantulas.

The grant, from Teichert Foundation of Teichert, Inc., a Sacramento-based construction company, will fund two workshops for teachers and two children’s entomology camps this summer, said entomologist Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum. The Teichert Foundation grant will provide tuition and transcript fees for 21 teachers to receive continuing education on insects.

Further information on participating in the workshops or kids’ camps is available from Danielle DuCharme at the Bohart Museum: (530) 752-9555. For full information, see: http://bohart.ucdavis.edu.

Kathy Garvey
Department of Entomology
(530) 754-6894
[email protected]

 

Back to top ^

 

 

Robert Page: Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

 

Robert E. Page Jr., who chaired the Department of Entomology from 1990–2004 before assuming his current position at Arizona State University, was named a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

A pioneer in the field of evolutionary genetics and the social behavior of honeybees, Page did much of his research at UC Davis. He received his doctorate in entomology at UC Davis in 1980, and joined the UC Davis faculty in 1989. The 2006 American Academy Fellows are listed online at: http://www.amacad.org.

Kathy Garvey
Department of Entomology
(530) 754-6894
[email protected]

 

Back to top ^

 

 

Arboretum Balancing Trees, Wildlife Challenges

 

The UC Davis Arboretum, home to one of North America’s finest and most diverse collections of oak trees, has launched an effort to protect and enhance the Shields Oak Grove while as the same time manage and enhance the wildlife at the arboretum.

It is a new challenge for arboretum managers, who during the past five years have watched in amazement as their prized oak collection has evolved from a small breeding area for herons into one of the largest nesting areas in Yolo County. UC Davis wildlife ecologists estimate that more than 2,400 egrets and herons nested or roosted in Shields Oak Grove last year, producing more than 800 chicks. Arboretum officials are growing concerned that the birds and their excrement are taking a toll on the health of the oak trees where the birds have built their nests.

The Shields Oak Grove is a living library that contains the largest collection of mature oaks in the southwestern United States – 346 trees representing 89 oak species, varieties, and hybrids, some of which are rare and endangered. Arboretum director Kathleen Socolofsky calls Shields Oak Grove "the best-kept secret of the arboretum, and we're trying to make it a more attractive and educational destination. To do so, we need to manage in a comprehensive manner if we are to protect and enhance trees and other life in the grove."

In January, Melanie Truan and Amanda Castaneda, researchers in the Department of Wildlife, Fish and Conservation Biology, released an extensive arboretum wildlife management and enhancement plan that helped form the basis for a comprehensive healthy ecosystem approach. To view the entire UC Davis Arboretum Wildlife Management and Enhancement Plan, and other related materials, visit: http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu.

This story was featured in last week’s UC Davis Dateline, and is the lead story on the campus home Web page, http://www.ucdavis.edu/index.html.

UC Davis News Service
http://www.news.ucdavis.edu/search/news_detail.lasso?id=7739

 

Back to top ^

 

 

New Children’s Growth Standards: Kathryn Dewey Research

 

The work of Kathryn Dewey, a professor in the Department of Nutrition who specializes in the health of mothers and children, is reflected in new international growth standards for children, which were recently announced by the World Health Organization. Her research team collected data on the growth of children in the Davis area for use in developing the new growth standards.

For complete information on the new growth standards from the World Health Organization, see http://www.who.int/en.

UC Davis News Service
http://www.news.ucdavis.edu/search/news_detail.lasso?id=7728

Kathryn Dewey
Nutrition
(530) 752-0851
[email protected]

 

Back to top ^

 

 

Bats, Insects Face Rougher-than-normal Spring

 

Dharma Webber, founder of the California Native Bat Conservancy, said the inclement weather has suppressed populations of flying insects that bats rely upon for food. Although there is no scientific data showing that insect numbers are low enough to cause a bat famine, Webber said the bats look like starving animals.

Scientists note that the usual proliferation of spring insects is delayed. Arthur Shapiro, a professor in the Department of Entomology and an international authority on butterflies, said that “for butterflies it is the worse spring in the 35 years I’ve been here, hands down”. Ken Lorenzen, a scientist at the Bohart Museum of Entomology who studies nocturnal insects such as moths, said you can still find bugs out and about even during a light rain on a cool night. Whether that is enough insects for the bats is another matter.

The Sacramento Bee
http://www.news.ucdavis.edu/in_the_news/full_text/view_clip.lasso?id=15056

 

Back to top ^

 

 

Mexican Corn Farmers Face Crisis: Stephen Brush Reports

 

Little evidence exists that Mexico is losing its rich tradition of growing corn varieties to the threat of globalization and transgenic hybrids, but Stephen Brush, an agricultural anthropologist and professor in human and community development, is seeing a crisis for the small farmer. “Overall, the market for Mexican-grown maize or corn for tortillas continues to be robust but low prices and competition with U.S. imports have made it impossible for Mexican farmers to support themselves”, says Brush.

In 2004–2005, Brush spent a year in Morelia, a city northwest of Mexico City, studying the local consumer markets for traditional varieties of maize as well as the tortilla business.

UC Davis News Service
http://www.news.ucdavis.edu/search/news_detail.lasso?id=7724

Stephen Brush
Human and Community Development
(530) 752-4368
[email protected]

 

Back to top ^

 

 

Picnic Day Parade Winner: Food Science Graduate Students

 

The Food Science Graduate Student Association put together a float for the Picnic Day Parade and won the “Best Representation of Theme” award. Their theme was “Play with Your Food” and featured a float with a large felt egg dangling from a swingset. Walking with the float were faculty, students, and families dressed as fruits, vegetables, and cheese.

During the event, food science undergraduates served 1,800 cups of free ice cream to visitors and demonstrated food safety and other research going on within the department.

Karen Gurley
Food Science & Technology
(530) 752-8079
[email protected]

 

Back to top ^

 

 

Governor’s Environmental and Economic Leadership Award

 

The 2006 Governor’s Environmental and Economic Leadership award program recognizes individuals, organizations, and businesses that have demonstrated exceptional leadership and made notable voluntary contributions in conserving California’s precious resources, protecting and enhancing California’s environment, and building public-private partnerships.

The application deadline is June 8, 2006. To download an application, see http://www.calepa.ca.gov/Awards/GEELA.

California Environmental Protection Agency
(916) 322-7649

 

Back to top ^

 

 

5th Annual Food Olympics

 

Teams of 4 to 8 people will compete for prizes at the fifth annual Food Olympics on Sunday, May 7, at 10:00 a.m. in the Cruess Hall courtyard. The cost is $40.00/team and the competition is limited to 8 teams. Events include culinary combat, food trivia, field events, and food architecture.

The event is sponsored by the Food Science Graduate Student Association. For more information, see http://foodscience.ucdavis.edu/fsgsa.

Laura Gillies
Food Science and Technology
[email protected]

 

Back to top ^

 

 

A Quarter Abroad in South Africa

 

A new quarter abroad program begins Winter Quarter, 2007, in South Africa at the University of Stellenbosch. The program will feature biodiversity and conservation and biodiversity and society courses that explore the natural and cultural riches of the country of South Africa. The program is limited to UC Davis students in good academic standing (GPA of 2.00 or higher and not on academic probation), and there is a prerequisite requirement (or consent of instructors Pete Cranston and Penny Gullan).

Please let students and student advisors know of this unique opportunity. For complete information, see the Web site on the CA&ES International Programs page at http://quarterabroad.ucdavis.edu/programs/stellenbosch/stellenbosch.htm.

Pete Cranston
Entomology
(530) 754-5803
[email protected]

Penny Gullan
Entomology
(530) 754-5805
[email protected]

 

Back to top ^

 

 

UC Seeks Applicants for Information Technology Award

 

The University of California is seeking applications for the Larry L. Sautter Award for Innovation in Technology. The award is open to faculty and staff from all UC campuses, the Office of the President, and the three UC-managed laboratories. The honor recognizes information technology innovations that have the potential to improve UC administrative or academic processes. The deadline for applications is 5:00 p.m., May 15, 2006.

Application information can be found at www.ucop.edu/irc/itlc/sautter/documents/06SautterProgAnnounce_000.pdf.

Jennifer Ward
(510) 987-9398
[email protected]

 

Back to top ^

 

 

Agricultural Health and Safety Conference

 

Heath and Safety in Western Agriculture: Research to Practice, a conference sponsored by the Western Center for Agricultural Health and Safety, the Pacific Northwest Agricultural Safety and Health Center, and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, will be held at the Asilomar Conference Ground in Pacific Grove, Calif., on September 20­–22. Registration is required.

For more information, see http://agcenter.ucdavis.edu/.

Sandra Freeland
Western Center for Agricultural Health and Safety
(530) 752-5253
[email protected]

 

Back to top ^

 

 

Arboretum Events

 

The guided tours listed below are free and open to the public unless otherwise indicated. For more information, visit the arboretum Web site: http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu.

"All-Star Native Plants for Central Valley Gardens," Saturday, May 6, 11 a.m., Buehler Alumni and Visitors Center
Native plants are popular with gardeners because they are adapted to our climate and they support native birds and pollinators. Docent Nancy Houlding will lead this tour, in the Mary Wattis Brown Garden of California native plants. It will focus on plants in bloom, and end in an out-of-the-way corner where native ferns grow.

"Walk with Warren," Wednesday, May 10, 12 noon, Arboretum Headquarters
Join arboretum superintendent Warren Roberts for a lunchtime stroll in the campus arboretum. Enjoy the spring flowers, learn about the Arboretum’s collections, and get a little exercise.

"Spring in the White Flower Garden," Saturday, May 13, 11 a.m., Gazebo
A garden of white flowers is sometimes called a "moon garden." At night, white flowers and silvery leaves reflect the available light and are highly visible when colored flowers are not. White flower gardens are popular in hot climates, since they can be viewed in the cool of the evening. Docent Don Christiansen will lead this tour of the White Flower Garden.

Spring Plant Sale, Saturday, May 20 (final sale of the season), 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Orchard Park Nursery (Orchard Rd. at LaRue Rd.)
Enhance your garden with beautiful spring plants from the Friends of the UC Davis Arboretum plant sales. The sales feature hundreds of different plants that have been grown in Davis and thrive in Central Valley conditions, including newly-introduced and unusual garden plants that are hard to find or not available in commercial nurseries. Members of the Friends of the UC Davis Arboretum receive a 10 percent discount, and anyone may join at the sales.

"Ethnobotany: Traditional and Medicinal Uses of Native Plants," Saturday, May 20, 11 a.m., Buehler Alumni and Visitors Center
Without a grocery store, where would you find food? Without a drug store, how would you treat your illnesses? Native Californians make skillful use of many local plants, actively managing the landscape for long-term sustainable yields. Traditional ethnobotanical uses of plants for food, clothing, shelter, and medicine will be featured during this tour, led by docent Shannon Murphy.

"California Native Trees and Shrubs for Your Garden," Saturday, May 27, 11 a.m., Buehler Alumni and Visitors Center
Trees and shrubs are the “bones” of the garden, providing year-round structure. California is home to a wide variety of native trees and shrubs that do well in home gardens, from the striking silk tassel tree to the graceful weeping mayten, to towering oaks and fragrant evergreens. Learn about the natural history and garden care of some of these plants on a tour led by Docent Kend Linderholm.

 

Back to top ^

 

 

Growing Up Means Learning How to Walk; May 5, 2006

 

Alex Kelter, California Department of Health Services, will present the seminar “Growing Up Means Learning How to Walk” on Friday, May 5, from noon to 1 p.m. in Room 202, Wellman Hall. All are welcome to attend.

This spring quarter lunch bag lecture series is sponsored by the Landscape Architecture Program. Information about the program can be found at: http://lda.ucdavis.edu/newsevents/default.html.

Stephani Shone
Landscape Architecture Program
(530) 752-3907
[email protected]

 

Back to top ^

 

 

Latina Teen Pregnancy Prevention and Research; May 9, 2006

 

Fe Moncloa, Cooperative Extension 4-H youth and community development advisor, will present “Latina Teen Pregnancy Prevention and Research” as part of the 4-H Center for Youth Development Spring Seminar Series. Her presentation will be on May 9, from 11:00 a.m. to 12:50 p.m. in the Garrison Room, Memorial Union.

For more information on the seminar series, see http://fourhcyd.ucdavis.edu/events/default.html.

Amy Van Scoik
Human and Community Development
(530) 752-3006
[email protected]

 

Back to top ^

 

 

Alfalfa and Forages/Small Grains Field Day; May 9, 2006

 

The Alfalfa and Forages/Small Grains Field Day will be held at the UC Davis Agronomy Farm Field Headquarters on Hutchison Road on Tuesday, May 9, 2006. The small grains portion will be from 8:00 a.m. to noon, and the Alfalfa and forages portion from 1:00 to 4:45 p.m. The program details and directions are available at the ANR Calendar Web site, http://ucce.ucdavis.edu/calendar/eventdisplay.cfm?caleventnum=13806.

For more information, contact Lee Jackson (530-752-0701, [email protected]) or Dan Putnam (530-752-8982, [email protected]).

Janice Corner
Plant Sciences
(530) 752-7091
[email protected]

 

Back to top ^

 

 

Automobile Dependency; May 12, 2006

 

Susan Handy, Department of Environmental Science and Policy, will present the seminar “Automobile Dependency” on Friday, May 12, from noon to 1 p.m. in Room 202, Wellman Hall. All are welcome to attend.

This spring quarter lunch bag lecture series is sponsored by the Landscape Architecture Program. Information about the program can be found at: http://lda.ucdavis.edu/newsevents/default.html.

Stephani Shone
Landscape Architecture Program
(530) 752-3907
[email protected]

 

Back to top ^

 

 

CIFAR Conference XXII; May 15–16, 2006

 

The Culinary Institute of America, Greystone Campus, in St. Helena, Calif., will host CIFAR Conference XXII, “Innovation in a World Without Borders,” on May 15–16, 2006. The conference will focus on cutting-edge trends, issues, and challenges in global food technology, nutrition, marketing and distribution, and much more. Registration is required.

The conference is sponsored by UC Davis Connect and the California Institute of Food and Agricultural Research (CIFAR). For conference agenda and registration information, see http://www.cifar.ucdavis.edu/xxii/agenda.htm.

Thomas Spahr
UC Davis CONNECT
(530) 757-3569
[email protected]

 

Back to top ^

 

 

Garden Based Education; May 16, 2006

 

Daniel Desmond, retired Cooperative Extension youth development advisor, and Rose Hayden-Smith, 4-H youth development advisor, will present “Garden Based Education” as part of the 4-H Center for Youth Development Spring Seminar Series. Their presentation will be on May 16, from 11:00 a.m. to 12:50 p.m. in the De Carli Room, Memorial Union.

For more information on the seminar series, see http://fourhcyd.ucdavis.edu/events/default.html.

Amy Van Scoik
Human and Community Development
(530) 752-3006
[email protected]

 

Back to top ^

 

 

Management of Fruit Ripening Workshop; May 22, 2006

 

The annual Management of Fruit Ripening Workshop will be held on Monday, May 22, 2006, at the Buehler Alumni and Visitors Center, AGR Room. The program is for shippers and destinations (wholesale and retail) handlers who are involved in ripening fruits and fruit-vegetables. This workshop focuses on how to increase profits by delivering ready-to-eat, delicious fruits and fruit-vegetables to the consumer.

For more information and to register: http://postharvest.ucdavis.edu/Announce/fruitripeningbrochure06.pdf.

Jim Thompson
Biological and Agricultural Engineering
(530) 752-6167
[email protected]

 

Back to top ^

 

 

Foster Youth; May 23, 2006

 

Steve Dasher, a Cooperative Extension 4-H youth, family, and community development advisor, will present “Foster Youth” as part of the 4-H Center for Youth Development Spring Seminar Series. His presentation will be on May 23, from 11:00 a.m. to 12:50 p.m. in the Mee Room, Memorial Union.

For more information on the seminar series, see http://fourhcyd.ucdavis.edu/events/default.html.

Amy Van Scoik
Human and Community Development
(530) 752-3006
[email protected]

 

Back to top ^

 

 

After School Programs; May 30, 2006

 

Keith Nathaniel, a Cooperative Extension 4-H youth development academic coordinator, will present “After School Programs” as part of the 4-H Center for Youth Development Spring Seminar Series. His presentation will be on May 30, from 11:00 a.m. to 12:50 p.m. in the Garrison Room, Memorial Union.

For more information on the seminar series, see http://fourhcyd.ucdavis.edu/events/default.html.

Amy Van Scoik
Human and Community Development
(530) 752-3006
[email protected]

 

Back to top ^

 

 

ANR and Conservation Biology Workshop; June 8, 2006

 

Members of the UC ANR Conservation Biology Workgroup and others interested in conservation biology are encouraged to attend the workshop on Thursday, June 8, from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. in the Bowley Plant Science Teaching Center. The mission of the workgroup is to plan and offer opportunities in the multidisciplinary and applied fields of conservation biology, including research, education, and service-oriented activities.

Travel funds are available and morning refreshments and lunch will be provided. The registration deadline is May 28, 2006. For agenda and registration information, contact:

Deborah Rogers
Genetic Resources Conservation Program
(510) 799-7653
[email protected]

 

Back to top ^

 

 

 

 

 


Visit CA&ES Currents online at http://caes.ucdavis.edu/NewsEvents/currents.

CA&ES Currents, the faculty/staff newsletter of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at UC Davis, is published on the first and third Thursday of each month (in July and August, only on the first Thursday.)

News deadline is noon Monday preceding Thursday publication. Send news items to editor, [email protected].

Issue Editor:
Ann Filmer
(530) 754-6788
[email protected]

Contributors: Ann Filmer, Thomas Kaiser, Rhoda McKnight, Neal Van Alfen, John Weston.

Some Web links cited in this newsletter may be inaccessible to off-campus sites. If you want to view the full stories on the Web from off campus, you will need to provide a username and password the first time you try to view a story: username: clips password: newz

To be added to or deleted from this electronic newsletter list, please write to [email protected].

The University of California does not discriminate in any of its policies, procedures or practices. The university is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer.

 

Student News

Design It, Build It

Aug 21, 2015 Truscott donation allows landscape architecture students to dig in.

Student News - More Student News…
Research News

UC Davis Receives Unique, $1.5 Million Gift from Aggie Couple

Jul 07, 2016 Michael and Joelle Hurlston have pledged $1.5 million to endow a first-of-its-kind chair position.

Research News - More Research News…
Outreach News

Summer Internships

Jul 28, 2015 CA&ES students and Salinas Valley employers find common ground.

Outreach News - More Outreach News…