CA&ES Currents Newsletter  icon newspaper

November 16, 2001

Jun 05, 2014 admin


Carolyn Aldwin on Coping with Terror Attacks

Carolyn Aldwin, professor of human development and family studies, Department of Human and Community Development, conducted extensive media interviews in the wake of the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. Some of the people affected by the tragedy -- victims, family members, rescue workers -- may develop post-traumatic stress disorder, she said. Accessing support services and counseling as soon as possible will help avoid this outcome. It's also important to spend time with loved ones and reassure children -- and turn the TV off when the images warrant it.


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Numbing the Pain
Gay teens are two to three times more likely to attempt suicide than their heterosexual peers. They also have higher rates of depression and alcohol abuse. These findings, published in a recent issue of the American Journal of Public Health, suggests that gay and lesbian youth who are concealing their sexual identities may use alcohol to numb the related problems of anxiety and depression.

Stephen T. Russell
4-H Youth Development Specialist
Department of Human and Community Development
[email protected]
(530) 219-3438

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Ron Voss Featured on Publication Cover
Ron Voss, a vegetable specialist in Cooperative Extension and director of the Vegetable Research and Information Center, was pictured on the cover of Western Farm Press. The publication, which covers agriculture in California and Arizona, highlighted Voss' extensive research in garlic.


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Go Easy, Young Sport
Many younger kids may not be ready for team sports. Parents who get their children involved in organized sports before the age of eight should have low expectations for their abilities to play as team members. The reason -- many kids simply don't pay attention to what other kids are thinking until they are seven or eight, thus making teamwork a challenging concept.

Lawrence Harper
Professor
Department of Human and Community Development
[email protected]
(530) 752-3624

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Sheri Zidenberg-Cherr Wins Curriculum Award
Sheri Zidenberg-Cherr, associate specialist in Cooperative Extension, won an Award of Excellence from the National School Public Relations Association for her education curriculum, "Nutrition to Grow On: A Garden Enhanced Nutrition Education Curriculum for Upper Elementary School Children." The course material was on display this past summer at the association's national seminar in Minneapolis, Minnesota.


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Crop Cost Studies Available
New studies on walnuts, prunes, almonds, broccoli and cauliflower illuminate the cost issues of raising these crops. Karen M. Klonsky, Cooperative Extension specialist, and Richard L. De Moura, Cooperative Extension staff research associate, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, were among researchers involved in the project.

University of California Cooperative Extension has made these studies and others available fordownload


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Peter Moyle Serves on Klamath Fish Panel
Professor Peter Moyle, Department of Wildlife, Fish and Conservation Biology, will serve on the National Research Council's panel assigned to investigate Klamath River fish flows in Southern Oregon. Moyle's research interests include ecology and conservation of freshwater, anadromous and estuarine fishes. This past summer U.S. secretary Gale Norton ordered the fast track study. The panel is due to release its findings by January 31, 2002.

Peter B. Moyle
Professor
Deptartment of Wildlife, Fish and Conservation Biology
[email protected]
(530) 752-6355

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Silencing Genes and Crown Gall
For the first time, a technique known as "gene silencing" has encouraged resistance to a bacterial disease in crop plants. The technique holds promise for developing genetically engineered trees and vines that can ward off crown gall, a costly disease that damages many perennial fruit and nut crops, such as walnuts, grapes and apples. In crown gall, the molecular takeover of the plant's genetic code causes the plant to produce proteins that in turn trigger tumor formations.

Abhaya Dandekar
Professor
Department of Pomology
(530) 752-7784

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Caroline Bledsoe Elected to AAAS
Professor Caroline Bledsoe, Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, was elected to the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Her research has covered mycorrhizal ecology and belowground biodiversity, nitrogen cycling in forests, and biology of culinary and medicinal herbs. The AAAS is the world's largest scientific organization, and publishes the journal Science. "My election as an AAAS fellow recognizes the importance and relevance of beneficial mycorrhizal fungi that interact with plant roots in soils. That's been my life's work, and I am so happy to see its importance recognized," Bledsoe said.


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Lung Injury Issues in Costa Rica
UC Davis researchers are exploring whether Costa Rican farm workers have been exposed to the herbicide paraquat. To conduct this study in agricultural lung disease, scientists will travel to Costa Rican farms and plantations to interview and administer pulmonary function tests to about 450 workers. In particular, they will measure pulmonary function, oxygen capacities, and both short- and long-term exposures to paraquat.

More information is availableonline

Mark Schenker
Director
UC Agricultural Health and Safety Center
(530) 752-4050

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Thomas Cahill Receives Clean Air Award
Thomas Cahill, professor emeritus of atmospheric sciences and physics, Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, is this year's recipient of the American Lung Association of California's Clean Air Globe Award. Cahill has conducted research on air pollution and atmospheric physics. Established in 1976, the Clean Air Globe Award recognizes individuals who have made significant contributions to healthier air in the state.


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Easing the Burden of Grape Picking
A new tractor-mounted grape bin transporter will help vineyard workers take the strain out of wine grape harvests. The equipment picks up loaded grape bins from the vineyard rows, relieving harvesters of lifting and carrying the bins, which often weigh as much as 65 pounds. The project was developed through the Agricultural Ergonomics Research Center.

John A. Miles
Professor
Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering
[email protected]
(530) 304-1339

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Carl Winter Sings of Food Safety
Carl Winter, a toxicologist specialist in Cooperative Extension and the director of the FoodSafe Program, sings about food safety issues on a new CD, "Still Stayin' Alive,'" of '70s and '80s musical parodies. This is Winters' third CD on food safety issues.


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Weeding Out Chemical Use
Multiple studies involving dairies, rice, walnuts, citrus, strawberries, apples and prunes show potential for reducing the use of synthetic pesticides and fertilizers. For example, nitrogen fertilizer applications rates in the walnut project were reduced by an average of 53 pounds per acre with no apparent effect on yield.

Jenny Broome
Associate Director
SAREP
(530) 754-8547

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Miguel Marino Honored by AWRA
Professor Miguel Marino, Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, received an honorary membership in the American Water Resources Association. Marino has extensive experience in groundwater modeling, contamination and management, water resource planning and management, hydrologic systems analysis and irrigation management. AWRA presented the award on November 11, 2001, in Albuquerque, New Mexico.


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Cecilia E. Murphey Scholarship Available
CA&ES is accepting applications for the Cecilia E. Murphey Award. The awards, up to $5,000 each, are available to qualified students majoring in one of the agricultural and environmental sciences. Applicants must be Yolo or Sacramento County residents, demonstrate financial need and plan to register for the 2002-2003 academic year in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Pick up forms at CA&ES, 150 Mrak Hall, or the Financial Aid Office, 1100 Dutton Hall. Deadline: December 4, 2001


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Graham Fogg Chosen as Birdsall-Dreiss Lecturer
Graham Fogg, professor of hydrogeology, Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, won the 2002 Birdsall-Dreiss Distinguished Lecturer award from the Hydrogeology Division of the Geological Society of America. In 2002, Fogg will present 30 to 40 Birdsall-Dreiss lectures worldwide.


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California League of Food Processors Scholarship
The California League of Food Processors' scholarships, up to $1,000 each, are available to students pursuing careers in food processing, especially those involved in the canning of fruits and vegetable crops. Students must demonstrate financial need. Obtain the Undergraduate Scholarship Application from the Financial Aid Office, 1100 Dutton Hall, or the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Dean's Office, 150 Mrak Hall. Deadline: December 4, 2001

Richard R. Engel
Director of Outreach
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
[email protected]
(530) 754-6249

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Jim Wilen Selected AAEA Fellow
Professor James Wilen, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, has been selected a fellow of the American Agricultural and Economics Association. On August 7, 2001, he was honored for his contributions to the agricultural economics profession at AAEA's annual meeting in Chicago. Wilen's scholarship has focused on resource economics, environmental economics and microeconomics. The AAEA Fellows distinction is the organization's highest award.


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RFP: UC Statewide IPM Project
The UC Statewide IPM Project is seeking proposals for funding of integrated pest management research in 2002-2003. Proposals should address one or more aspects of pesticide reduction in the environment. Deadline: January 14, 2001

Statewide IPM Project online

Donna Connolly
UC Statewide IPM Project
(530) 752-5336

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Dolph Gotelli Stages Victorian Christmas
Dolph Gotelli, Department of Environmental Design professor and 2001 Award of Distinction recipient, unveils his world-class Christmas exhibition at the Crocker Art Museum in Sacramento this upcoming holiday season. Dubbed "Compliments of the Season: A Victorian Christmas by Dolph Gotelli," this exhibition features thousands of Christmas objects from the Victorian period. The museum holds special exhibitions on December 9, from 1 to 4:30 p.m. (Crocker Celebrates the Season); December 13 at 7 p.m. (Walls of Light: The History of Stained Glass); and December 16 at 11 a.m. (Sunday Morning at the Crocker: Holiday Spirit).

VisitCrocker Art Museum Online

Dolph E. Gotelli
Professor
Department of Environmental Design
[email protected]
(530) 752-2589

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RFP: Pacific Rim Research Program
The Pacific Rim Research Program announces its 2002-2003 call for proposals. The research program encourages scholarship on Pacific Rim topics in a variety of disciplines, placing a special emphasis on research that is new, specific to the region and collaborative across national boundaries and disciplines. Deadline: January 7, 2001



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The Evolution of Theme Park Design
An exhibition on the evolution of theme parks will be held at the UC Davis Design Museum from January 13 to February 15, 2002. The "Reality to Fantasy: The Evolution of Theme Park Design" exhibit at 145 Walker Hall will run Monday through Friday, 12 noon to 5 p.m., and Sunday from 2 to 4 p.m. A curator's talk is slated for January 13 at 176 Everson Hall.

Rhonda R. O'Brien
Program Representative
Department of Environmental Design
[email protected]
(530) 752-6223

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Fall Arboretum Tours
This fall the UC Davis Arboretum will host guided tours of its plant life. On November 25, 2001, interested parties should meet at the Arboretum Headquarters for a walking tour on "Edible and Useful Plants in Your Garden." On December 2, the tour, "The Terrace in Winter," starts at the Arboretum Terrace. All walks begin at 2 p.m.


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Pesticide Handling Workshop
The Pesticide Education Program will hold a November 30 workshop in Winters for pesticide handlers and agricultural fieldworkers. The eight-hour session includes information on how to conduct effective training programs and what training is required for both pesticide handlers and agricultural fieldworkers.

Gale Pérez
UC Statewide IPM Project
[email protected]
(530) 752-5273

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Mondavi Gift of $25 Million Benefits CA&ES
On September 19, 2001, Robert Mondavi, and his wife, Margrit, made a personal gift of $25 million to UC Davis, establishing the Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science. Due to open in 2006, the new 75,000 square-foot Robert Mondavi Institute will house the Departments of Food Science and Technology and Viticulture and Enology, and promote collaboration with researchers from a variety of academic fields. The institute also will feature a 13,000 square-foot food processing plant and a 36,000 square-foot teaching and research winery. Planning for the new facility is underway with groundbreaking anticipated in 2004. A faculty committee has been appointed to lay the organizational groundwork for the Robert Mondavi Institute. Members include wine researchers Linda Bisson and Andrew Waterhouse from the Department of Viticulture and Enology; food scientists John Krochta and Stephanie Dungan from the Department of Food Science and Technology; nutritionist Janet King; and Robert Smiley, dean of the UC Davis Graduate School of Management. Also appointed to the committee are Charles Shoemaker and James Wolpert, chairs of the food science and technology department and viticulture and enology department, respectively. Robert Powell, a professor of chemical engineering, will chair the committee. DeeDee Kitterman, executive director of research and outreach, will represent the dean's office of CA&ES.


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UC Experts Examine Air at Ground Zero
UC Davis scientists have been collecting and analyzing air samples from the wreckage of the World Trade Center in New York. Thomas Cahill, LAWR professor of atmospheric sciences and physics, is leading the UC Davis DELTA Group (Detection and Evaluation of Long-range Transport of Aerosols) in conducting the sampling. Scientists will look for health threats such as inhalable particles, toxic metals, asbestos and byproducts of burning plastic.


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New Agri-Tourism Web Site Launched
To better connect tourists with California's agricultural industry, the UC Small Farm system has created a new online database. The idea is to offer visitors a chance to spend time at working farms. More than 300 farms are listed, including bed-and-breakfasts, U-pick operations and farmers' markets, among others.

Visit the databaseonline

Desmond A. Jolly
Small Farm Center
[email protected]
(530) 752-8136

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California Alfalfa and Forage Symposium
The 2001 California Alfalfa and Forage Symposium will be held December 12-13, 2001, in Modesto. Forage growers statewide will convene to discuss evolving forage markets, pest control, irrigation, economics and management topics. One key issue facing alfalfa growers is the ascent of alternative forage crops. The UC California Alfalfa Workgroup and UC farm advisors developed the program

Nikki D. Picanco
Department of Agronomy and Range Science
[email protected]
(530) 752-0700

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California Water Tours
The Water Education Foundation will hold several tours of regional water bodies and facilities next year. Participants learn about local, state and federal issues from a host of water experts. Northern California tours in 2002 include trips through the Central Valley (May 22-24), Bay-Delta (June 19-21), Sierra Watersheds (September 11-13), and regional water facilities and fisheries (October 2-4).



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Online Site for Fruit and Nut Growers
A new Web site called the "California Backyard Orchard" offers fruit and nut growers the latest information about their crops. Developed by UC Cooperative Extension farm advisors and master gardeners, the site covers topics such as the different fruit and nut tree crops, climate, management, planting and pruning, and pests and diseases.

VisitCalifornia Backyard Orchard

Donna Seaver
Department of Pomology
[email protected]
(530) 754-9708

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Literature of the Wine and Grape Industry
The Maynard Amerine Viticulture and Enology Room represents one of the world's most extensive collections of wine-making research literature. With more than 27,000 volumes of material in 29 different languages, the collection focuses on grape growing, grape diseases, wine, fermentation science and economic issues. Named in honor of the late Maynard Amerine, professor emeritus of viticulture and enology, the materials are housed on the third floor of the Peter J. Shields Library.



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CA&ES Adds Webmaster
CA&ES, in a continuing effort to expand its communications abilities, has added Julia Munsch as a Webmaster in its Communications Unit. She will work on upgrading the CA&ES Web site by developing additional content for the College's pages, building more interactivity into the site, providing Web consultation for departments, centers and programs, and ensuring compliance with campus Web standards. Munsch previously served in the UC Life Sciences Informatics Program.

Julia A. Munsch
Webmaster
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
[email protected]
(530) 754-7771

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Tomatoes Grow in Salty Water
A genetically engineered tomato plant that thrives in salty irrigation water offers hope that crops can grow in harsh, salty conditions. The discovery of a salt-tolerance gene in the tomato plants holds the key to modification. An expanding global population makes the continued loss of valuable farmland due to salt problems a serious concern. Over the next 30 years it is expected that developing nations will need to boost food production by 60 percent and developed countries by 20 percent.

Eduardo Blumwald
Professor
Department of Pomology
[email protected]
(530) 752-4640

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High-flying Crop Management
Satellites and aircraft are enabling farmers to customize crop management for different areas within a given field. Known as site-specific management, this approach serves to maximize crop yield while minimizing costs and environmental risks. Images from technology high above can monitor soil conditions and plant growth, thus making cultivation and herbicide application more precise and cost-effective.

Richard E. Plant
Professor
Department of Agronomy and Range Science
[email protected]
(530) 752-1705

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The Roots of Young Vine Decline
The mysterious fungi that causes young vine decline actually may evolve with grapevines. Research indicates these fungi can live in a grapevine without causing it damage until some type of stress triggers the disease. Young vine decline, a complex disease sometimes called "black goo" for the dark sap it produces, results in slower vine growth, smaller trunk size and reduced foliage.

Doug Gubler
Cooperative Extension Specialist
Department of Plant Pathology
[email protected]
(530) 752-0304

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The Alternative to 'All Work, No Play'
Adults need to play -- it's the number one issue facing today's fun-challenged society, says a UC Davis researcher. The solution -- more fantasy. "With fantasy play lacking, society becomes stagnant, and we lose the mind-to-hand creativity," explains design professor Dolph Gotelli, Department of Environmental Design. Make up a fairy tale, design your dream garden, dress in a costume when it's not Halloween, or create food in artful designs.

Dolph E. Gotelli
Professor
Department of Environmental Design
[email protected]
(530) 752-2589

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CA&ES Currents, the faculty/staff newsletter of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at UC Davis, is distributed every other Friday. News deadline is noon Monday preceding Friday publication. Send inquiries to Ann Filmer, [email protected]

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(530) 752-6556

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